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[10 years of translabyrinthine surgery for acoustic neuroma in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26058
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Oct 19;149(43):2901-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-1987

Acoustic neuroma surgery: results of translabyrinthine tumour removal in 300 patients. Discussion of choice of approach in relation to overall results and possibility of hearing preservation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25628
Source
Br J Neurosurg. 1989;3(3):349-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
J. Thomsen
M. Tos
A. Harmsen
Author Affiliation
University ENT Department, Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Br J Neurosurg. 1989;3(3):349-60
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Ear, Inner - surgery
Facial Paralysis - prevention & control
Hearing Loss - prevention & control
Hearing Tests
Humans
Middle Aged
Neuroma, Acoustic - epidemiology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - prevention & control
Abstract
The results from the Danish model of acoustic neuroma surgery are presented. In the period from 1976 to 1985, 300 patients with acoustic neuromas were operated upon using the translabyrinthine procedure. Only one small intrameatal tumour was encountered; 96 tumours were medium sized and 203 were larger than 25 mm. Of these 118 measured more than 40 mm. Mortality rate was 2%, CSF leaks occurred in 11%, and had to be closed surgically in 5%. Facial nerve function was postoperatively normal in 66%, slightly reduced in 17%, moderately reduced in 8% and abolished in 9%. Reconstruction, most often as a XII-VII anastomosis, was performed in only 6% of the patients. Cerebellar symptoms, which occurred in 45% preoperatively were present in only 7% after surgery. The preoperative hearing in both the tumour and non-tumour ear was analysed in 72 patients with tumours smaller than 2 cm. In the tumour ear, only four patients had a PTA of 0-20 dB and SDS of 81-100%; eight patients had a PTA of 0-40 dB and SDS of 61-100%; 14 had a PTA of 0-50 dB and SDS of 51-100%. This means that only a maximum of 5% of the patients, using the broadest criteria, could be candidates for hearing-conserving surgery. In all these patients the contralateral ear had hearing within normal limits (PTA 0-20 dB and SDS 95-100%). Since preservation of hearing would be achieved in only half of those subjected to suboccipital removal and since the hearing retained in patients with successful operations generally is poorer than the preoperative level, the number of patients obtaining serviceable hearing is so modest that preservation of hearing cannot be considered a valid argument in favour of suboccipital tumour removal. From a statistical point of view the risk of losing hearing in the opposite ear after tumour removal is negligible. The general morbidity after suboccipital surgery is higher than after translabyrinthine surgery, and hearing loss must be listed low among the other sequelae after tumour removal.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Neurosurg. 1989;3(6):741-32627290
Comment In: Br J Neurosurg. 1990;4(4):3562222886
PubMed ID
2789720 View in PubMed
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Alaska/Russian Far East women's health and family planning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4570
Source
Alaska Med. 1994 Jul-Sep;36(3):148-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
R J Thomsen
Source
Alaska Med. 1994 Jul-Sep;36(3):148-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Alaska
Family Planning Services
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Russia
Women's health
PubMed ID
7802157 View in PubMed
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An assessment of cumulative external doses from Chernobyl fallout for a forested area in Russia using the optically stimulated luminescence from quartz inclusions in bricks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158263
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2008 Jul;99(7):1154-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
V. Ramzaev
L. Bøtter-Jensen
K J Thomsen
K G Andersson
A S Murray
Author Affiliation
St Petersburg Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Mira Street 8, 197101 St Petersburg, Russia. v.ramzaev@mail.ru
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2008 Jul;99(7):1154-64
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air pollution, radioactive - analysis
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Construction Materials
Ecosystem
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Humans
Quartz - analysis
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Russia
Trees - growth & development
Abstract
Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) has been used for estimation of the accumulated doses in quartz inclusions obtained from two fired bricks, extracted in July 2004 from a building located in the forested surroundings of the recreational area Novie Bobovichi, the Bryansk Region, Russia. The area was significantly contaminated by Chernobyl fallout with initial (137)Cs ground deposition level of approximately 1.1 MBq m(-2). The accumulated OSL doses in sections of the bricks varied from 141 to 207 mGy, of which between 76 and 146 mGy are attributable to Chernobyl fallout. Using the OSL depth-dose profiles obtained from the exposed bricks and the results from a gamma-ray-survey of the area, the Chernobyl-related cumulative gamma-ray dose for a point detector located in free air at a height of 1m above the ground in the study area was estimated to be ca. 240 mGy for the time period starting on 27 April 1986 and ending on 31 July 2004. This result is in good agreement with the result of deterministic modelling of the cumulative gamma-ray dose in free air above undisturbed ground from the Chernobyl source in the Bryansk Region. Over the same time period, the external Chernobyl-related dose via forest pathway for the most exposed individuals (e.g., forest workers) is estimated to be approximately 39 mSv. Prognosis for the external exposure from 1986 to 2056 is presented and compared with the predictions given by other investigators of the region.
PubMed ID
18342414 View in PubMed
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Characterization of metabolic responders on CSII treatment amongst children and adolescents in Denmark from 2007 to 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271148
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2015 Aug;109(2):279-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
I. Overgaard Ingeholm
J. Svensson
B. Olsen
L. Lyngsøe
J. Thomsen
J. Johannesen
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2015 Aug;109(2):279-86
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage
Incidence
Injections, Subcutaneous
Insulin - administration & dosage
Insulin Infusion Systems
Male
Prospective Studies
Abstract
This prospective study aimed to identify and estimate the frequency of responders offered Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) from baseline data and during follow-up, and secondly to characterize CSII users with good adherence to pump therapy among 463 children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus.
A response was defined as lowering HbA1c with 1% or achieving an HbA1c
PubMed ID
26070217 View in PubMed
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Commonly recommended daily intake of vitamin D is not sufficient if sunlight exposure is limited.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61816
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Feb;247(2):260-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
H. Glerup
K. Mikkelsen
L. Poulsen
E. Hass
S. Overbeck
J. Thomsen
P. Charles
E F Eriksen
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Aarhus Amtssygehus, University Hospital of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark. h.glerup@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Feb;247(2):260-8
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Arabs
Calcium - blood - urine
Case-Control Studies
Clothing - adverse effects
Creatinine - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - ethnology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Hydroxyproline - urine
Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary - blood - diagnosis
Magnesium - blood
Nutrition Policy
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Phosphates - blood
Sunlight
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Sunlight exposure of the skin is known to be the most important source of vitamin D. The aims of this study were: (i) to estimate vitamin D status amongst sunlight-deprived individuals (veiled Arab women, veiled ethnic Danish Moslem women and Danish controls); and (ii) through food intake analysis to estimate the oral intake of vitamin D necessary to keep a normal vitamin D status in sunlight-deprived individuals. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study amongst randomly selected Moslem women of Arab origin living in Denmark. Age-matched Danish women were included as controls. To control for racial differences, a group of veiled ethnic Danish Moslem women (all Caucasians) was included. SETTING: Primary Health Care Centre, City Vest and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism C, University Hospital of Aarhus, Aarhus Amtssygehus, Aarhus, Denmark. SUBJECTS: Sixty-nine Arab women (60 veiled, nine non-veiled) and 44 age-matched Danish controls were randomly selected amongst patients contacting the primary health care centre for reasons other than vitamin D deficiency. Ten ethnic Danish Moslem women were included through a direct contact with their community. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were used as estimates of vitamin D status. Intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) was used to control for secondary hyperparathyroidism. Alkaline phosphatase and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase were used as markers for osteomalacic bone involvement. Oral intake of vitamin D and calcium were estimated through a historical food intake interview performed by a trained clinical dietician. RESULTS: Veiled Arab women displayed extremely low values of 25-hydroxyvitamin D: 7.1 +/- 1.1 nmol L-1, compared with 17.5 +/- 2. 3 (P
PubMed ID
10692090 View in PubMed
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A comparative study of two different methods of measuring stature and the velocity of growth in children and adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37709
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1990 May;12(2):166-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
J. Thomsen
P. Evald
V. Skieller
A. Björk
Author Affiliation
Royal Dental College, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1990 May;12(2):166-73
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Anthropometry - instrumentation - methods
Body Height
Child
Comparative Study
Denmark
Female
Growth
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Abstract
The stretched technique of measuring the stature described by Tanner (1962) is claimed to minimize the variation which occurs during the course of the day. This study examines differences in the calculated growth rate for the stretched and the conventional methods. The data for the analysis was drawn from a larger longitudinal growth study (Björk, 1968), where the stature of the individuals was measured both by the conventional unstretched technique according to Hrdlicka (1939) and by the stretched method described by Tanner (1962). A total of 84 individuals (48 boys and 36 girls) representing a total of 805 measurements of stature for each of the methods were included in the study. The individuals were measured annually until adult age, after which the measurements were made at intervals of 2-5 years. This represents a total range of 6-32 years of age, with individual series of observation varying over a period of 4-16 years. In accordance with the definition the stature measured by the stretched technique was significantly higher than measured by the unstretched method. The growth rate, however, at any age level did not differ significantly for the two methods and the variability in growth rate was the same. It was concluded that the unstretched technique gives similar values for estimating growth-velocity curves as does the stretched technique.
PubMed ID
2351201 View in PubMed
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Cystic acoustic neuromas. Results of translabyrinthine surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23458
Source
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1994 Dec;120(12):1333-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
S. Charabi
M. Tos
S E Børgesen
J. Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Gentofte University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1994 Dec;120(12):1333-8
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cysts - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Ear, Inner
Facial Nerve Injuries
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intraoperative Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative
Neuroma, Acoustic - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to investigate the surgical outcome of translabyrinthine surgery of cystic acoustic neuromas. DESIGN: Prospective registration of audiovestibular, otoneurologic, and neuroradiologic data of all patients operated on for cystic neuromas in the period 1976 to 1992. The diagnosis was proposed by neuroradiologic investigation, confirmed at surgery, and verified histologically. Clinical follow-up was performed 1 year after surgery. SETTING: The study included all patients with cystic acoustic neuromas from the entire country, referred to the centralized otoneurosurgical team in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Gentofte University Hospital, and Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. PATIENTS: The study included 23 patients (11 female and 12 male). Ages ranged between 23 and 77 years with a median of 51.2 years. MAIN OUTCOME: Our hypothesis suggested that surgical outcome of cystic acoustic neuromas was poorer compared with noncystic acoustic neuromas of matching size. The results of this study seem to confirm the hypothesis. RESULTS: The results are rather poor compared with results achieved in surgery of noncystic tumors of matching size, particularly the poor postoperative facial nerve function. CONCLUSIONS: Even though the operation for a cystic acoustic neuroma may appear to be easier and faster than the operation for a solid tumor, there is a high risk for accidental lesion of the facial nerve, in spite of using facial nerve monitoring. Rapid symptomatic worsening may occur due to sudden expansion of cystic elements and, therefore, a wait-and-see policy should not be applied to patients with cystic tumors.
PubMed ID
7980897 View in PubMed
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[Developments in the treatment of neurinomas of the acoustic nerve]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18079
Source
Laryngorhinootologie. 2003 Nov;82(11):752-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003

Early, active diagnosis of acoustic neuromas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27501
Source
Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1979;360:42-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
J. Thomsen
M. Tos
Source
Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1979;360:42-4
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Ear, Inner - surgery
Humans
Neuroma, Acoustic - diagnosis - surgery
Abstract
Since the introduction of the translabyrinthine approach in the treatment of acoustic neuromas in Denmark. 47 patients have been operated on, the series containing 2% small, 60% medium and 38% large tumours. This distribution differs significantly from previously published tumour series, where the large tumours dominated. The paper describes the various diagnostic procedures applied in the present active search for acoustic neuromas, and the reduction in tumour size is ascribed to information on the improved surgical results obtained by the translabyrinthine approach.
PubMed ID
287348 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.