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Airway hyperresponsiveness, elevation of serum-specific IgE and activation of T cells following allergen exposure in sensitized Brown-Norway rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15906
Source
Immunology. 1995 Aug;85(4):598-603
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
A. Haczku
K F Chung
J. Sun
P J Barnes
A B Kay
R. Moqbel
Author Affiliation
Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, National Heart and Lung Institute, London, UK.
Source
Immunology. 1995 Aug;85(4):598-603
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - immunology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - immunology
Female
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Lymphocyte Activation - immunology
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
T-Lymphocyte Subsets - immunology
Abstract
T lymphocytes may play a regulatory role in the development of allergic airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). We have studied the relationship between airway responsiveness and a number of immunological changes in Brown-Norway rats sensitized intraperitoneally and repeatedly exposed to ovalbumin (OVA) aerosol. Acetylcholine provocation concentration (PC)150 (the concentration of acetylcholine causing a 150% increase of base-line lung resistance) was measured and peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells were collected 18-24hr after the final exposure. Total and OVA-specific IgE in serum was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Mononuclear cells were analysed by flow cytometry after labelling with monoclonal antibodies against CD2 (pan T-cell marker), CD4, CD8 (T-cell subsets) or CD25 (interleukin-2 receptor). There were significant differences in PC150 (P
PubMed ID
7558155 View in PubMed
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Anti-PF4/heparin antibodies and venous graft occlusion in postcoronary artery bypass surgery patients randomized to postoperative unfractionated heparin or fondaparinux thromboprophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118371
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Feb;11(2):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
T E Warkentin
J I Sheppard
J C J Sun
H. Jung
J W Eikelboom
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. twarken@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Feb;11(2):253-60
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies - blood
Anticoagulants - adverse effects - immunology
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects
Cross Reactions
Graft Occlusion, Vascular - etiology - immunology
Heparin - adverse effects - immunology
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Platelet Factor 4 - immunology
Polysaccharides - adverse effects - immunology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Thrombocytopenia - etiology - immunology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Anti-PF4/heparin antibodies are frequently generated after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery, with platelet-activating IgG implicated in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). It is controversial whether non-platelet-activating antibodies are associated with thrombosis.
To determine in post-CABG patients whether thromboprophylaxis using fondaparinux vs. unfractionated heparin (UFH) reduces the frequency of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies, and whether anti-PF4/heparin antibodies are associated with early graft occlusion.
In a pre-planned secondary analysis of a randomized control trial (RCT) comparing fondaparinux vs. UFH thromboprophylaxis post-CABG, we determined the frequency of anti-PF4/heparin antibody formation by solid-phase enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) and of platelet-activating antibodies by serotonin-release assay (SRA); the SRA and fluid-phase EIA were used to assess fondaparinux cross-reactivity. We also examined whether anti-PF4/heparin antibodies were associated with early arterial or venous graft occlusion (6-week CT angiography).
We found no significant difference in the frequency of antibody formation between patients who received fondaparinux vs. UFH (65.3% vs. 46.0%; P = 0.069), and no significant fondaparinux cross-reactivity. Venous graft occlusion(s) occurred in 6/26 patients who formed 'strong' IgG antibodies (= 1.0 optical density [OD] units and = 2? baseline) vs. 3/66 who did not (P = 0.0139). In both unadjusted and adjusted analyses, strong postoperative (but not pre-operative) anti-PF4/heparin IgG responses were associated with a markedly increased risk of early venous (but not arterial) graft occlusion (adjusted OR, 9.25 [95% CI, 1.73, 49.43]; P = 0.0093); notably, none of the three SRA-positive patients developed a venous graft occlusion.
Fondaparinux vs. UFH thromboprophylaxis postCABG does not reduce anti-PF4/heparin antibody formation. Non-platelet-activating anti-PF4/heparin IgG antibodies generated post operatively are associated with early venous graft occlusion.
PubMed ID
23216710 View in PubMed
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Clonotypic heterogeneity in experimental interstitial nephritis. Restricted specificity of the anti-tubular basement membrane B cell repertoire is associated with a disease-modifying crossreactive idiotype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57819
Source
J Exp Med. 1988 Apr 1;167(4):1296-312
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1988
Author
M D Clayman
M J Sun
L. Michaud
J. Brill-Dashoff
R. Riblet
E G Neilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia 19104.
Source
J Exp Med. 1988 Apr 1;167(4):1296-312
Date
Apr-1-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal - genetics - immunology
Antigens - immunology
Autoantibodies - genetics - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - immunology - pathology - therapy
B-Lymphocytes - pathology
Basement Membrane - immunology
Clone Cells - pathology
Immunoglobulin G - genetics - immunology - therapeutic use
Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains - genetics
Immunoglobulin Idiotypes - immunology
Immunoglobulin Variable Region - genetics
Kidney Tubules - immunology
Nephritis, Interstitial - immunology - pathology - therapy
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Experimental anti-tubular basement membrane (anti-TBM) disease is an autoimmune interstitial nephritis elicited in susceptible rodents after immunization with renal tubular antigen. The nephritogenic antigen in the immunizing preparation is 3M-1, a 48,000 Mr noncollagenous glycoprotein. The hallmarks of the renal lesion are the presence of anti-TBM antibodies (anti-TBM-Ab) and a dense mononuclear cell infiltrate. The anti-TBM B cell repertoire in this disease was analyzed using a library of 22 anti-TBM mAbs generated in a prototypically susceptible Brown Norway rat. These anti-TBM mAbs were all demonstrated to be 3M-1 specific and their characterization formed the basis for the following observations: (a) The size of the anti-TBM B cell population is estimated at 58 distinct clones; (b) by competitive inhibition criteria, all anti-TBM mAbs recognize the same (or spatially close) epitope(s) on 3M-1. This focused recognition was maintained in spite of considerable variability in affinity. Epitopic dominance could also be demonstrated in human polyclonal anti-TBM antisera from a patient with anti-TBM disease; and (c) a crossreactive idiotype was documented, and antisera directed toward this set of variable region determinants was shown to be effective as a prophylactic regimen to abrogate disease, and as a therapeutic modality to arrest the progression of disease; (d) analysis of VH gene families suggested biased usage of Q52- and 7183-like families, although at least three gene families are used in the anti-TBM-Ab response. Thus, the anti-TBM B cell compartment in BN rats is moderately large, but is primarily focused to a single epitope on the nephritogenic antigen and is associated with a disease-modifying crossreactive idiotype.
PubMed ID
3128629 View in PubMed
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Contribution of intercellular-adhesion molecule-1 in allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in sensitised brown-Norway rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15953
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 1994 Jul;104(3):291-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
J. Sun
W. Elwood
A. Haczku
P J Barnes
P G Hellewell
K F Chung
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, London, UK.
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 1994 Jul;104(3):291-5
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Asthma - immunology - prevention & control
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - immunology - prevention & control
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Cell Adhesion Molecules - immunology
Eosinophils - immunology
Female
Inflammation - pathology
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
Leukocyte Count
Lymphocytes - immunology
Ovalbumin
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
We investigated the potential role of intercellular-adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in allergen-induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and inflammation in sensitised Brown-Norway rats. Rats were sensitised with ovalbumin (OA) intraperitoneally and 21 days later they were either exposed to 0.9% NaCl or 1% OA aerosol for 15 min. Rats exposed to OA aerosol were pretreated either with ICAM-1 antibody (3 mg/kg i.p. and i.v., 45 min prior to OA exposure) or with the diluent for the antibody. Eighteen to twenty-four hours after OA or 0.9% NaCl exposure, rats were anaesthetised, tracheostomised and mechanically ventilated, and airway responsiveness to acetylcholine (ACh) aerosol was measured as the provocative concentration of ACh needed to increase pulmorary resistance by 100% (PC100). Mean -log PC100 was increased in rats exposed to OA but pretreated with diluent (2.75 +/- 0.06) compared to rats treated with ICAM-1 antibody (2.51 +/- 0.08;
PubMed ID
7913357 View in PubMed
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Empirical estimation of a distribution function with truncated and doubly interval-censored data and its application to AIDS studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214497
Source
Biometrics. 1995 Sep;51(3):1096-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
J. Sun
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Waterloo, Ontario Canada.
Source
Biometrics. 1995 Sep;51(3):1096-104
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - mortality - transmission
Algorithms
Biometry
Bisexuality
Cohort Studies
Drug Contamination
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
HIV-1
Hemophilia A - therapy
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Male
Mathematics
Models, Statistical
Ontario
Probability
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Abstract
In this paper we discuss the non-parametric estimation of a distribution function based on incomplete data for which the measurement origin of a survival time or the date of enrollment in a study is known only to belong to an interval. Also the survival time of interest itself is observed from a truncated distribution and is known only to lie in an interval. To estimate the distribution function, a simple self-consistency algorithm, a generalization of Turnbull's (1976, Journal of the Royal Statistical Association, Series B 38, 290-295) self-consistency algorithm, is proposed. This method is then used to analyze two AIDS cohort studies, for which direct use of the EM algorithm (Dempster, Laird and Rubin, 1976, Journal of the Royal Statistical Association, Series B 39, 1-38), which is computationally complicated, has previously been the usual method of the analysis.
PubMed ID
7548693 View in PubMed
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Genetic variation in the COX-2 gene and the association with prostate cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16449
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Feb 27;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-27-2006
Author
K. Shahedi
S. Lindström
S L Zheng
F. Wiklund
J. Adolfsson
J. Sun
K. Augustsson-Bälter
B-L Chang
H-O Adami
W. Liu
H. Grönberg
J. Xu
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, University of Umeå Umeå Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Feb 27;
Date
Feb-27-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
COX-2 is a key enzyme in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins. The prostaglandins produced by COX-2 are involved in inflammation and pain response in different tissues in the body. Accumulating evidence from epidemiologic studies, chemical carcinogen-induced rodent models and clinical trials indicate that COX-2 plays a role in human carcinogenesis and is overexpressed in prostate cancer tissue. We examined whether sequence variants in the COX-2 gene are associated with prostate cancer risk. We analyzed a large population-based case-control study, cancer prostate in Sweden (CAPS) consisting of 1,378 cases and 782 controls. We evaluated 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the entire COX-2 gene in 94 subjects of the control group. Five SNPs had a minor allele frequency of more than 5% in our study population and these were genotyped in all case patients and control subjects and gene-specific haplotypes were constructed. A statistically significant difference in allele frequency between cases and controls was observed for 2 of the SNPs (+3100 T/G and +8365 C/T), with an odds ratio of 0.78 (95% CI = 0.64-0.96) and 0.65 (95% CI = 0.45-0.94) respectively. In the haplotype analysis, 1 haplotype carrying the variant allele from both +3100 T/G and +8365 C/T, with a population frequency of 3%, was also significantly associated with decreased risk of prostate cancer (p = 0.036, global simulated p-value = 0.046). This study supports the hypothesis that inflammation is involved in prostate carcinogenesis and that sequence variation within the COX-2 gene influence the risk of prostate cancer. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
PubMed ID
16506214 View in PubMed
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Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist haplotype associated with prostate cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16835
Source
Br J Cancer. 2005 Aug 22;93(4):493-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-22-2005
Author
F. Lindmark
S L Zheng
F. Wiklund
K A Bälter
J. Sun
B. Chang
M. Hedelin
J. Clark
J-E Johansson
D A Meyers
H-O Adami
W. Isaacs
H. Grönberg
J. Xu
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Sciences/Oncology, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2005 Aug 22;93(4):493-7
Date
Aug-22-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Genotype
Haplotypes
Humans
Inflammation - genetics
Male
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prostatic Neoplasms - genetics - immunology
Risk factors
Sialoglycoproteins - genetics - physiology
Sweden
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
IL1-RN is an important anti-inflammatory cytokine that modulate the inflammation response by binding to IL1 receptors, and as a consequence inhibits the action of proinflammatory cytokines IL1alpha and IL1beta. In this study, we hypothesise that sequence variants in the IL1-RN gene are associated with prostate cancer risk. The study population, a population-based case-control study in Sweden, consisted of 1383 prostate cancer case patients and 779 control subjects. We first selected 18 sequence variants covering the IL1-RN gene and genotyped these single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 96 control subjects. Gene-specific haplotypes of IL1-RN were constructed and four haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (htSNPs) were identified (rs878972, rs315934, rs3087263 and rs315951) that could uniquely describe >95% of the haplotypes. All study subjects were genotyped for the four htSNPs. No significant difference in genotype frequencies between cases and controls were observed for any of the four SNPs based on a multiplicative genetic model. Overall there was no significant difference in haplotype frequencies between cases and controls; however, the prevalence of the most common haplotype (ATGC) was significantly higher among cases (38.7%) compared to controls (33.5%) (haplotype-specific P = 0.009). Evaluation of the prostate cancer risk associated with carrying the 'ATGC' haplotype revealed that homozygous carriers were at significantly increased risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.2), compared to noncarriers, while no significant association was found among subjects heterozygous for the haplotype (OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.8-1.2). Restricting analyses to advanced prostate cancer strengthened the association between the 'ATGC' haplotype and disease risk (OR for homozygous carriers vs noncarriers 1.8, 95% CI = 1.3-2.5). In conclusion, the results from this study support the hypothesis that inflammation has a role of in the development of prostate cancer, but further studies are needed to identify the causal variants in this region and to elucidate the biological mechanism for this association.
PubMed ID
16106254 View in PubMed
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Neither insufficiency nor overexpression of sac1 affects the accumulation of Aß42 in Drosophila expressing Ab42.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263111
Source
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2015 May;19(9):1700-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
M. Han
J-K Huang
H-Y Liu
W-A Wang
X-J Sun
F-D Huang
Source
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2015 May;19(9):1700-5
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We investigated the effects of genetic down- and up-regulation of sac1 expression on Aß42 accumulation and the associated neural deficits in flies with direct expression of arctic mutant Aß42 (Aßarc) in the neurons of GF pathway.
We genetically down-regulated and up-regulated the level of sac1, encoding a major phosphoinositide phosphatases in a disease model, in which arctic mutant Aß42 is directly expressed in the neurons of a neural pathway of adult fruit flies.
We conducted a time-course analysis of Aß42 level in the model and found an age-dependent elevation of Aß42 accumulation, closely correlated to the age-dependent decline of climbing ability in the model flies. Neither sac1 insufficiency nor sac1 over-expression significantly changed the three phenotypes.
We found that the alterations of sac1 expression did not change Aß42 accumulation and neural deficits in the model.
PubMed ID
26004612 View in PubMed
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Pulmonary artery catheters: evolving rates and reasons for use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135270
Source
Crit Care Med. 2011 Jul;39(7):1613-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Karen K Y Koo
Jack C J Sun
Qi Zhou
Gordan Guyatt
Deborah J Cook
Stephen D Walter
Maureen O Meade
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. karen.koo@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Crit Care Med. 2011 Jul;39(7):1613-8
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Catheterization, Swan-Ganz - trends - utilization
Female
Humans
Intensive Care Units - trends
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns - trends
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Randomized trials have demonstrated risks and failed to establish a clear benefit for the use of the pulmonary artery catheter. We assessed rates of pulmonary artery catheter use in multiple centers over 5 yrs, variables associated with their use, and how these variables changed over time (2002-2006).
A multicenter longitudinal study using the Hamilton Regional Critical Care Database. A two-level multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine significant variables associated with pulmonary artery catheter use and whether these varied over time.
Academic intensive care units in Hamilton, Canada.
We identified patients from five intensive care units who received a pulmonary artery catheter within the first 2 days of intensive care unit admission.
Pulmonary artery catheter use over a 5-yr period.
Among 15,006 patients, 1,921 (12.8%) had a pulmonary artery catheter. Adjusted rates of pulmonary artery catheter use decreased from 16.4% to 6.5% over 5 yrs. Determinants of pulmonary artery catheter use included Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (odds ratio [OR], 1.05; confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.06; p 50% reduction in the rate of pulmonary artery catheter use over 5 yrs. Patient factors predicting pulmonary artery catheter use were illness severity, specific diagnoses, and the need for advanced life support. Nonpatient factors predicting pulmonary artery catheter use were intensive care unit and the attending physician's base specialty.
Notes
Comment In: Crit Care Med. 2011 Jul;39(7):1820-221685743
PubMed ID
21494107 View in PubMed
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Survival from primary breast cancer after routine clinical use of mammography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189464
Source
Breast J. 2002 Jul-Aug;8(4):199-208
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Sun
J. Chapman
R. Gordon
R. Sivaramakrishna
M. Link
E. Fish
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Breast J. 2002 Jul-Aug;8(4):199-208
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - radiography - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - standards
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Mammography - standards
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Staging
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Clinical trials indicate that mammography provides a substantial breast cancer survival benefit; however, there is a need to demonstrate that this benefit extends to clinical practice and to determine the extent that current reductions in mortality are attributable to regular screening or adjuvant systemic therapy. Mammography was used routinely at our institution across a broad age range, in an era when most patients received no adjuvant systemic therapy. We examined breast cancer survival for a cohort of 678 stage I-III primary invasive breast cancer patients accrued from 1971 to 1990, and followed to 1996; 18% received adjuvant hormonal therapy and 15% received adjuvant chemotherapy. There were 61 women less than 40 years old; 136, 40-49 years; 341, 50-69 years; 140, > or =70 years. Factors available for multivariate investigations were age (years), tumor size (cm), nodal status (N-, Nx, N+), ER (fmol/mg protein), PgR (fmol/mg protein), adjuvant radiotherapy (no, yes), adjuvant hormonal therapy (no, yes), and adjuvant chemotherapy (no, yes). Forward stepwise multivariate regression with log-normal survival analysis was used to examine the effects of these factors on disease-specific survival. Ten-year survival by tumor size was adjusted for the effects of other significant factors. For women less than 40 years of age, 10-year survival at the T1a, T1b, T1c, and T2 cut-points for tumor size is, respectively, 0.77, 0.74, 0.67, 0.44; for 40-49 years it is 0.92, 0.90, 0.85, 0.62; for 50-69 years it is 0.81, 0.79, 0.75, 0.62; for > or =70 years it is 0.84, 0.81, 0.73, 0.44. With routine use of clinical mammography and up to 26 years of follow-up, we found breast cancer survival to be significantly better (p
Notes
Comment In: Breast J. 2002 Jul-Aug;8(4):185-612100108
PubMed ID
12100111 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.