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7 records – page 1 of 1.

A 6-month prospective study of hospital-acquired bacteremia in Copenhagen county.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34967
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(6):601-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
A G Jensen
A. Kirstein
I. Jensen
J. Scheibel
F. Espersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Herlev University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(6):601-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteremia - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Cross Infection - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Abstract
During a 6-month period, 892 positive blood cultures were detected in the Copenhagen County hospitals. 302 (34%) were regarded as contaminations, and of the remaining cases 419 (71%) were community-acquired and 171 (29%) hospital-acquired, giving incidence rates of 6.8/1,000 admissions and 2.8/1,000 admissions, respectively. Both frequency and rate of hospital-acquired bacteremia were lower compared to most other studies. E. coli was more commonly found in community-acquired infections, while coagulase-negative staphylococci were the organisms most often considered as a contaminant. The main causative organisms in hospital-acquired infections were S. aureus (n = 37) and E. coli (n = 34). The proportion of polymicrobial bacteremias in this study was lower compared to most other studies (8%). E. coli from hospital-acquired infections were resistant to ampicillin in 42% of cases, but other Enterobacteriaceae showed higher percentage of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. S. aureus was penicillin-resistant in 92% of cases, but no methicillin-resistant strains were isolated. The frequency of antibiotic resistance was low compared to reports from other countries. A total of 136 hospital-acquired cases were followed prospectively. 61% of the patients were male and 46% were > or = 60 years of age. Most patients had predisposing diseases, 90% had foreign body and/or recent surgery performed, and 74 (54%) had an intraveneous catheter. The portal of entry was known in 132 (97%) of the cases, the most common being the urinary tract (42%), followed by an intravenous catheter (30%). The prevalence of urinary tract catheters gave an increased number of cases with E. coli bacteremia. The mortality was 16%.
PubMed ID
9060064 View in PubMed
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[Are there too many cases of bacterial gastroenteritis?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75636
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Mar 20;151(12):751
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1989
Author
J. Scheibel
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Mar 20;151(12):751
Date
Mar-20-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
PubMed ID
2711483 View in PubMed
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Non-typhoid Salmonella bacteraemia in Greater Copenhagen 1984 to 1988.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37119
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1991 Jun;10(6):486-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
A. Lester
N H Eriksen
H. Nielsen
P B Nielsen
A. Friis-Møller
B. Bruun
J. Scheibel
K. Gaarslev
H J Kolmos
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1991 Jun;10(6):486-90
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacteremia - complications - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gastroenteritis - complications
Humans
Immune Tolerance
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Salmonella - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Salmonella Infections - complications - epidemiology
Serotyping
Travel
Abstract
A retrospective survey of non-typhoid Salmonella bacteraemia in the period 1984 to 1988 was carried out by the five departments of clinical microbiology in Greater Copenhagen. A total of 168 patients were identified. A gradual increase was observed from 11 cases in 1984 to 58 cases in 1988. The corresponding incidence per 100,000 inhabitants in Copenhagen rose from 0.9 in 1984 to 5.0 in 1988. During the same period the total registered incidence of human Salmonella infections in Denmark increased from 17.6 to 67.4 per 100,000 inhabitants. The serotype most often isolated from bacteraemic patients was Salmonella dublin followed by Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium. Salmonella dublin demonstrated enhanced invasive and pathogenic properties. Predisposing factors were present in 56% of the patients; the most common was malignant disease. A fatal or complicated course of the bacteraemia was observed more frequently in patients with underlying diseases than in persons who had previously been healthy. A total of 17% of the patients died; one-fifth of these had a ruptured aortic aneurysm. It is concluded that the substantial increase in the number of cases and the often serious course taken by the infection demonstrate a need for increased efforts at prophylaxis.
PubMed ID
1915383 View in PubMed
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Source
Nord Med. 1990;105(10):252-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
N H Eriksen
J. Scheibel
R. Vejlsgaard
Author Affiliation
Klinisk mikrobiologisk afd, Københavns Amts Sygehus i Herlev.
Source
Nord Med. 1990;105(10):252-4
Date
1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Humans
Meningitis - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Suppuration
Abstract
The epidemiology of meningococcal disease in Denmark has changed in recent years, with a rise in the number of cases in the 14-18 year age group. During the last decade 80 per cent of the meningococci belonged to Group B and 20 per cent to Group C. The treatment has followed the lines of the recommendations issued by the Rigshospitalet but some hospital departments have now chosen other preparations, as appears from the study presented in the article.
PubMed ID
2235467 View in PubMed
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Risk factors for hospital-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33270
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1999 Jul 12;159(13):1437-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-12-1999
Author
A G Jensen
C H Wachmann
K B Poulsen
F. Espersen
J. Scheibel
P. Skinhøj
N. Frimodt-Møller
Author Affiliation
Sector for Microbiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1999 Jul 12;159(13):1437-44
Date
Jul-12-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - adverse effects
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - complications
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Bacteremia - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Catheterization, Central Venous - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross Infection - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitals, Community
Humans
Hyponatremia - complications
Immunocompromised Host
Infant
Infusions, Intravenous - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Nose - microbiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Renal Dialysis - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Staphylococcus aureus
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects
Survival Analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) acquired in hospitals continues to be a frequent and serious complication to hospitalization, and no previous case-control studies dealing with risk factors of this severe disease are available. METHODS: Based on a 1-year prospective analysis, the data from all patients with hospital-acquired SAB admitted to 4 hospitals in Copenhagen County, Denmark, from May 1, 1994, through April 30, 1995, were evaluated. Eighty-five patients with hospital-acquired SAB were matched to 85 control patients with a similar primary diagnosis at admission (matched controls). Of these, 62 patients with hospital-acquired SAB were compared with 118 other patients with a similar time of admission, who were randomly selected with no clinical evidence of SAB (unmatched controls). RESULTS: The incidence of hospital-acquired SAB was 0.71 per 1000 hospital admissions. The presence of a central venous catheter (odds ratio, 6.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8-17.0), anemia (odds ratio, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.4-7.6), and hyponatremia (odds ratio, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.5-7.0) was significantly associated with hospital-acquired SAB in a conditional and a usual logistic regression analysis. Nasal carriage was not an independent risk factor, but nasal carriers among patients in surgery (odds ratio, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.3-13.0) had a significantly higher risk for hospital-acquired SAB compared with matched and unmatched controls. The presence of hospital-acquired SAB increased the mortality rate 2.4-fold (95% CI, 1.1-5.2). CONCLUSIONS: The presence of a central venous catheter is an important risk factor, and hyponatremia and anemia are associated with the development of hospital-acquired SAB. Furthermore, hospital-acquired SAB in itself increases mortality.
PubMed ID
10399895 View in PubMed
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[Salmonella bacteremia in the greater Copenhagen area 1989 and 1990].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225852
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Aug 26;153(35):2439
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1991

Staphylococcus aureus carriage and infections among patients in four haemo- and peritoneal-dialysis centres in Denmark. The Danish Study Group of Peritonitis in Dialysis (DASPID).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211371
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1996 Aug;33(4):289-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
J. Zimakoff
F. Bangsgaard Pedersen
L. Bergen
J. Baagø-Nielsen
B. Daldorph
F. Espersen
B. Gahrn Hansen
N. Høiby
O B Jepsen
P. Joffe
H J Kolmos
M. Klausen
K. Kristoffersen
J. Ladefoged
S. Olesen-Larsen
V T Rosdahl
J. Scheibel
B. Storm
P. Tofte-Jensen
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Hospital Hygiene, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen S, Denmark.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1996 Aug;33(4):289-300
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nose - microbiology
Peritoneal Dialysis, Continuous Ambulatory - adverse effects
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis - adverse effects
Skin - microbiology
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Staphylococcus aureus
Abstract
A three-month prospective surveillance study was undertaken in four dialysis centres to establish the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus carriage in a Danish population of patients on haemodialysis (HD) or on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). General data such as sex, age, diagnosis, number of months in dialysis, hospital and ward were registered on a precoded form. Standardized nose and four skin swabs (axillae, groins, perineum) were performed on the first day of the survey. After one and two months, nose swabs were collected. Infections were registered and cultures were sent for phage-typing together with the S. aureus strains isolated from the swabs; 59.5% of HD patients and 51.2% of CAPD patients carried S. aureus. Permanent carriage was most frequent (P
PubMed ID
8864941 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.