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Abnormal Newborn Screening in a Healthy Infant of a Mother with Undiagnosed Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261010
Source
JIMD Rep. 2015 Mar 13;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-13-2015
Author
Lise Aksglaede
Mette Christensen
Jess H Olesen
Morten Duno
Rikke K J Olsen
Brage S Andresen
David M Hougaard
Allan M Lund
Source
JIMD Rep. 2015 Mar 13;
Date
Mar-13-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A neonate with low blood free carnitine level on newborn tandem mass spectrometry screening was evaluated for possible carnitine transporter defect (CTD). The plasma concentration of free carnitine was marginally reduced, and the concentrations of acylcarnitines (including C6, C8, and C10:1) were normal on confirmatory tests. Organic acids in urine were normal. In addition, none of the frequent Faroese SLC22A5 mutations (p.N32S, c.825-52G>A) which are common in the Danish population were identified. Evaluation of the mother showed low-normal free carnitine, but highly elevated medium-chain acylcarnitines (C6, C8, and C10:1) consistent with medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD). The diagnosis was confirmed by the finding of homozygous presence of the c.985A>G mutation in ACADM.
PubMed ID
25763512 View in PubMed
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Absence of an environmental effect on the recurrence of facial-cleft defects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35236
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Jul 20;333(3):161-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-1995
Author
K. Christensen
M M Schmidt
M. Vaeth
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Center research unit, Steno Institute of Public Health, Aarhus.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Jul 20;333(3):161-4
Date
Jul-20-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cleft Lip - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Cleft Palate - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Paternity
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND. The rate of recurrence of a broad range of birth defects may decrease among women who change residence after the birth of their first infant. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of changing residence on the recurrence of congenital facial-cleft defects. METHODS. We identified 4189 women who had infants with facial-cleft defects by linking a data base comprising the records of children with facial clefts born between 1952 and 1987 with the Central Person Registry in Denmark. Among the 4189 mothers, 1902 each had additional children after the first child with a facial-cleft defect. A total of 2692 younger siblings were identified. We compared the proportion of infants with facial-cleft defects among the younger siblings between mothers who had changed municipalities or sexual partners and those who had not. RESULTS. Changing the municipality of residence did not decrease the frequency with which facial-cleft defects recurred in younger siblings. Among the 907 infants of mothers who changed municipalities but not partners, 29 (3.2 percent) had facial-cleft defects, as compared with 48 (3.4 percent) of 1425 infants of mothers who changed neither municipality nor partner (relative risk, 0.9; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.6 to 1.5). However, a change of partner reduced the recurrence risk significantly. Among 236 infants of mothers who changed partners, 1 (0.4 percent) had a facial-cleft defect, as compared with 77 (3.3 percent) of 2350 infants of mothers who did not change partners (relative risk, 0.1; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.02 to 0.9). CONCLUSIONS. Recurrence of facial-cleft defects is not linked to the residence of the mother, but having a different partner reduced a woman's risk of having a second child with this defect.
PubMed ID
7791818 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of cryptorchidism diagnoses and corrective surgical treatment registration in the Danish National Patient Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121500
Source
J Urol. 2012 Oct;188(4):1324-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
M S Jensen
T M Ø Snerum
L H Olsen
A M Thulstrup
J P Bonde
J. Olsen
T B Henriksen
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. morten@sondergaard-jensen.dk
Source
J Urol. 2012 Oct;188(4):1324-9
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cryptorchidism - diagnosis - surgery
Denmark
Humans
Infant
Male
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Young Adult
Abstract
In recent years several Danish studies of the etiology, time trends and long-term health consequences of cryptorchidism have relied on diagnoses and surgical treatments registered in the National Patient Registry. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of these registry data.
According to the Danish National Patient Registry, 16,168 males were diagnosed with cryptorchidism and 9,244 surgical treatments for cryptorchidism were performed between January 1, 1995 and October 10, 2009. We randomly selected 500 diagnosed cases, of which 284 had been managed surgically. We requested the medical records from the departments making the diagnoses and performing the surgery.
We successfully retrieved medical records for 452 diagnosed cases (90%) and 249 operations (88%). Overall positive predictive value of a registry diagnosis of cryptorchidism was 80% (95% CI 77-84) using the testicular position described by the physician performing the clinical examination as the gold standard. Similarly the positive predictive value of the surgical treatment registration was 99% (95% CI 98-100) using the type of procedure performed.
The data on cryptorchidism in the Danish National Patient Registry are quite accurate. In etiological research the limited misclassification will in most cases only slightly attenuate estimates of the true relative association. Thus, the registry has the potential to serve as a valuable research tool, although caution should be exercised when studying time trends or geographical differences.
PubMed ID
22902026 View in PubMed
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Admission for and mortality from primary venous thromboembolism in women of fertile age in Denmark, 1977-95.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200765
Source
BMJ. 1999 Sep 25;319(7213):820-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1999
Author
L. Mellemkjaer
H T Sørensen
L. Dreyer
J. Olsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, DK-2 100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. lene@cancer.dk
Source
BMJ. 1999 Sep 25;319(7213):820-1
Date
Sep-25-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Contraceptives, Oral - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Survival Rate
Thromboembolism - mortality - therapy
Venous Thrombosis - mortality - therapy
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1995 Dec 16;346(8990):1575-827500748
Cites: Lancet. 1995 Dec 16;346(8990):1589-937500750
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Jan 13;312(7023):83-88555935
Cites: Lancet. 1996 Aug 10;348(9024):401-28709744
Cites: Lancet. 1996 Aug 10;348(9024):4028709745
Comment In: BMJ. 1999 Sep 25;319(7213):795-610496802
PubMed ID
10496825 View in PubMed
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Adult and prenatal exposures to tobacco smoke as risk indicators of fertility among 430 Danish couples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203830
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Nov 15;148(10):992-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1998
Author
T K Jensen
T B Henriksen
N H Hjollund
T. Scheike
H. Kolstad
A. Giwercman
E. Ernst
J P Bonde
N E Skakkebaek
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Nov 15;148(10):992-7
Date
Nov-15-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fertility - drug effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Menstrual Cycle - drug effects
Odds Ratio
Paternal Exposure - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Semen - drug effects
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
During 1992-1995, 430 Danish couples were recruited after a nationwide mailing of a letter to 52,255 trade union members who were 20-35 years old, lived with a partner, and had no children. The couples were enrolled into the study when they discontinued birth control, and they were followed for six menstrual cycles or until a clinically recognized pregnancy. At enrollment and each month throughout the follow-up, both partners completed a questionnaire that asked them about their smoking, alcohol consumption, and intake of caffeinated beverages. The effect of current smoking and smoking exposure in utero was evaluated by using a logistic regression model with pregnancy outcome of each cycle in a Cox discrete model calculating the fecundability odds ratio. After adjustment for female body mass index and alcohol intake, diseases in female reproductive organs, semen quality, and duration of menstrual cycle, the fecundability odds ratio for smoking women exposed in utero was 0.53 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31-0.91) compared with unexposed nonsmokers. Fecundability odds ratio for nonsmoking women exposed in utero was 0.70 (95% CI 0.48-1.03) and that for female smokers not exposed in utero was 0.67 (95% CI 0.42-1.06). Exposure in utero was also associated with a decreased fecundability odds ratio in males (0.68, 95% CI 0.48-0.97), whereas present smoking did not reduce fecundability significantly. It seems advisable to encourage smoking cessation prior to the attempt to conceive as well as during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
9829871 View in PubMed
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Age of menarche and time to pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262159
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Sep;29(9):2058-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
K. Guldbrandsen
L B Håkonsen
A. Ernst
G. Toft
J. Lyngsø
J. Olsen
C H Ramlau-Hansen
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Sep;29(9):2058-64
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Menarche
Pregnancy
Time-to-Pregnancy
Abstract
Is age of menarche (AOM) associated with subfecundity and/or infertility in adulthood?
A late onset of menarche was associated with a slightly increased risk of subfecundity and infertility.
Abnormal age at onset of menarche is a risk factor for several diseases later in life, but the effect on infertility is unknown.
A cohort study of ?73 107 pregnant Danish women enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) between 1996 and 2002 with self-reported data on AOM and waiting time to pregnancy (TTP).
Information on AOM and TTP was collected through a computer-assisted telephone interview scheduled in pregnancy Week 12. We estimated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multivariate logistic regression with TTP categorized as subfecundity (TTP =6 months) and infertility (TTP >12 months). Multiple imputation was performed to account for missing data.
We found trends towards higher odds of subfecundity and infertility with increasing age of menarche, using 13 years as the starting point. Among women reaching menarche at 15 years, the odds for subfecundity were 1.09 (95% CI: 1.03-1.15), and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.09-1.25) for women reaching menarche later than 15 years compared with the reference group of girls reaching menarche at 13 years. Additionally, women reaching menarche older than 15 years had an OR of infertility of 1.18 (95% CI: 1.08-1.29). Women younger than 11 years at menarche had lower odds of subfecundity. The results were generally attenuated when adjusting for women's age of pregnancy, but the significant positive trend of higher OR for subfecundity persisted, as did the higher OR for subfecundity among women experiencing menarche older than 15 years.
We used retrospectively collected self-reported information on AOM and TTP. Information on male factors was limited in this cohort. We only included pregnant women and have therefore no data on women with untreated and unsuccessfully treated infertility, limiting the generalizability to women who became pregnant.
This study indicates that the onset of menarche at 15 years or later is associated with subfecundity and infertility.
The Danish National Research Foundation has established the Danish Epidemiology Science Centre that initiated and created the DNBC. The cohort is furthermore a result of a major grant from this Foundation. Additional support for the DNBC is obtained from the Pharmacy Foundation, the Egmont Foundation, the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, the Augustinus Foundation and the Health Foundation. This specific study was supported by a scholarship from the Ministry of Science and Innovation. No conflict of interest declared.
PubMed ID
25061027 View in PubMed
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[A group of homosexuals change their sex habits after information about AIDS. A questionnaire survey]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8468
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jul 24;151(30):1920-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-24-1989
Author
J. Bøttzauw
K. Hermansen
P. Tauris
L M Hansen
B. Nørgård
J B Hansen
P. Jørgensen
J. Olsen
F T Black
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jul 24;151(30):1920-2
Date
Jul-24-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control - transmission
Contraceptive Devices, Male
Denmark
English Abstract
HIV Seropositivity - prevention & control - transmission
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
A questionnaire investigation to which 144 homosexual persons replied anonomously revealed alterations in the sexual habits after information about AIDS. Significant reduction in the annual number of partners and significantly fewer employ the more dangerous sexual practices which now occur particularly in more permanent partnerships are among the alterations started. An unchanged number still employ active anal and orogenital coitus. Employment of condoms has increased significantly, particularly in anal coitus and "casual" partners (from 3% to 82%). The majority accept the use of condoms and state that they employ more "safe sex" than prior to information about AIDS. 12% stated that they had sex with both sexes and the possibility of spread of infection from homosexual to heterosexual groups is present. The intensive informative work from the homosexuals own organisation and from public health authorities appear to have had some effect but further information and influencing are necessary if the spread of HIV infection is to be stopped.
PubMed ID
2781650 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol-drinking habits among pregnant women in Odense 1985-1986]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12589
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 May 18;149(21):1420-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-18-1987

Alcohol use, conception time, and birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12886
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1983 Mar;37(1):63-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1983
Author
J. Olsen
P. Rachootin
A V Schiødt
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1983 Mar;37(1):63-5
Date
Mar-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Birth weight
Body Height
Denmark
Female
Fertilization
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Time Factors
Abstract
Predictors of birth weight and birth length were studied using sociodemographic data collected from 2259 women who resided in Funen County, Denmark, and delivered a healthy child during the period 1978-9 at Odense University Hospital. Low birth weight was significantly related to tobacco use in the year of delivery (p less than 0.01), alcohol use during the same period (p less than 0.05), and a delay in conception of over six months (p less than 0.01). Smoking history and a delay in conception were also significantly associated with short birth length (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.01, respectively).
PubMed ID
6875447 View in PubMed
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An estimate of the tendency to repeat postterm delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64071
Source
Epidemiology. 1999 Jul;10(4):468-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999

263 records – page 1 of 27.