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[Intrauterine growth retardation and premature delivery. The effect of smoking and psychosocial factors]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11050
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 May 26;159(22):3393-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-26-1997
Author
M. Nordentoft
H C Lou
D. Hansen
J. Nim
O A Pryds
P J Rubin
R P Hemmingsen
Author Affiliation
Bispebjerg Hospital, psykiatrisk afdeling, John F. Kennedy Instituttet, Glostrup.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 May 26;159(22):3393-400
Date
May-26-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Maternal Welfare
Obstetric Labor, Premature - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The purpose of the study is to investigate the influence of psychosocial stress, maternal schooling, social support, psychological well-being, alcohol and smoking on intrauterine growth retardation and premature delivery. At a Copenhagen university hospital 2432 consecutive Danish-speaking women in 20th week of pregnancy completed a questionnaire including the General Health Questionnaire and Severity of Psychosocial Stressor Scale and questions about social network, education, smoking and drinking habits. In 212 cases (8.7%) the women delivered before day 259 of gestation. In a multiple logistic regression model, pre-term delivery proved to be associated with psychosocial stress and poor school education. In 152 cases (6.3%) infants had a birth weight below the defined 10th percentile. In a multiple logistic regression model, IUGR was associated with smoking. In preventive programmes, such as anti-smoking campaigns, it should be kept in mind that women who smoke are also the least educated and have the poorest support from a social network.
PubMed ID
9199026 View in PubMed
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[The significance of psychosocial stress for pregnancy course and fetal development]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59209
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Apr 22;158(17):2369-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-22-1996
Author
D. Hansen
H C Lou
M. Nordentoft
O A Pryds
F R Jensen
J. Nim
R P Hemmingsen
Author Affiliation
Neonatalklinikken, og obstetrisk klinik, Staten Seruminstitut, Rigshospitalet,København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Apr 22;158(17):2369-72
Date
Apr-22-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cephalometry
Denmark
Embryonic and Fetal Development
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Life Change Events
Neurologic Examination
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Abstract
In a population-based study, 3021 women in a central Copenhagen district received a questionnaire on environmental and psychological factors during mid-gestation. Of these, 70 women were selected consecutively on the basis of moderate to severe stressful life-events (DSM-III-R categories 3 to 5), in combination with an inadequate social network. They were compared with 50 non-stressed women with an intact social network. Stress and smoking significantly affected birthweight and head circumference. When birthweight was corrected, stress remained a significant determinant of small head circumference, indicating a specific effect on brain development. Stress also led to a suboptimal Prechtl neonatal neurological score. These findings suggest the existence of a fetal stress syndrome with adverse effects on fetal development, including deficient brain development.
PubMed ID
8685988 View in PubMed
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