Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Lack of correlation between the incidence of rubella antibody and the distribution of HLA antigens in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41071
Source
Tissue Antigens. 1980 Mar;15(3):325-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1980
Author
H E Hansen
S O Larsen
J. Leerhøy
Source
Tissue Antigens. 1980 Mar;15(3):325-8
Date
Mar-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, viral
Antibody Specificity
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Gene Frequency
HLA Antigens - genetics - immunology
Humans
Male
Rubella - immunology
Time Factors
Abstract
The frequencies of HLA antigens among children (2.5-5 years, n = 71) and adults (ave. age 27 years, n = 154) with a strong Rubella specific antibody, and adults (n = 28) without Rubella specific antibody were investigated. No significant correlations were found. A total of 997 persons were included in the study.
PubMed ID
7466774 View in PubMed
Less detail

Neutralizing antibody to rubella virus in sera collected in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44452
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1968 Nov;15(9):273-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1968

A prospective study on the incidence and significance of congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60657
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1979 May;68(3):329-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1979
Author
H K Andersen
K. Brostrøm
K B Hansen
J. Leerhøy
M. Pedersen
O. Osterballe
U. Felsager
S. Mogensen
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1979 May;68(3):329-36
Date
May-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Cytomegalovirus Infections - congenital - diagnosis - epidemiology
Denmark
Female
Fetal Blood - immunology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Infant, Newborn
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Screening of 3060 neonates for congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection by virus excretion in the urine showed an overall incidence of 0.4%. The incidence was about 1% for mothers between 16 and 25 years and only 0.2% for mothers between 25 and 35. No mothers over 35 years of age gave birth to congenitally infected infants. The percentage of women in the child-bearing age susceptible to CMV infection was estimated by the absence of CMV complement-fixing antibodies in cord sera and ranged from 48% to 33% with increasing age. None of the infected infants showed obvious signs of congenital CMV infection at birth. At follow-up, two infants showed slight, but transient symptoms compatible with a foetal infection; a pair of premature twins exhibited retarded physical and psychomotor development, but this could just as well be ascribed to the prematurity itself. None of the infants had detectable CMV--IgM antibodies in cord sera, but a trend towards elevated total IgM concentration in cord sera and elevated virus excretion titres appeared in the infants with symptoms. With the very low incidence and no signs of sensomotor sequelae the preliminary conclusion is that foetal CMV infection in our population by no means has a significance to deserve screening or a vaccination programme.
PubMed ID
220837 View in PubMed
Less detail