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Erythrocyte porphobilinogen deaminase activity and primary liver cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23289
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 Mar;237(3):309-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
J. Kaczynski
G. Hansson
S. Thunell
L. Wetterberg
S. Wallerstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Göteborg, Ostra Sjukhuset, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 Mar;237(3):309-13
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Erythrocytes - enzymology
Female
Heterozygote
Humans
Hydroxymethylbilane Synthase - metabolism
Liver Neoplasms - enzymology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Porphyria, Acute Intermittent - enzymology - genetics
Prospective Studies
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. To study whether primary liver cancer (PLC) could be associated with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) carriership and whether the activity of erythrocyte porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) could be used as a tumour marker for PLC. DESIGN. Prospective study. SETTING. Medical and surgical wards in two general hospitals in G?teborg, Sweden. SUBJECTS. All patients with a strong suspicion of PLC (n = 109) who came to the authors' attention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. Measurement of PBGD activity in erythrocytes. Comparison of the PBGD activity in groups with various final diagnoses-hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 58), cholangiocellular carcinoma (n = 2), malignancy other than PLC (n = 18), benign liver disorders (n = 11)--and according to presence of cirrhosis. RESULTS. None of the patients had a clinical or family history of AIP. Four cases with low PBGD activity, suggesting AIP gene carriership, were found, which is more than expected. However, the cases were evenly distributed amongst the groups. The mean activity of PBGD was higher in cirrhotic patients, irrespective of the presence of PLC, than in others. CONCLUSIONS. (i) Acute intermittent porphyria gene carriership might be associated with an increased risk not only for PLC but also for secondary malignancies and benign tumours in the liver. (ii) High activity of PBGD is not unusual in liver cirrhosis and the reason for this needs to be elucidated, but it seems to be of no clinical value as a tumour marker for PLC.
PubMed ID
7891052 View in PubMed
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Fibrolamellar hepatic carcinoma in an area with a low incidence of primary liver cancer: a retrospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22644
Source
Eur J Surg. 1996 May;162(5):367-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
J. Kaczynski
B. Gustavsson
G. Hansson
S. Wallerstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Göteborg, Ostra Sjukhuset, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Surg. 1996 May;162(5):367-71
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology - mortality - pathology - surgery
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Liver - pathology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - pathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence and prognosis of fibrolamellar hepatic carcinoma in a defined population. DESIGN: Retrospective study of histological slides. SETTING: University hospital, Sweden. SUBJECTS: The 532 patients (out of a total of 711 who were treated at the university hospital during a 22 year period 1 January 1958-31 December 1979) whose primary hepatocellular carcinoma was confirmed on review of the histological slides. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence and prognosis of fibrolamellar hepatic carcinoma. RESULTS: Two patients (women aged 22 and 46) were found to have fibrolamellar tumours and in both they were advanced and the patients died 2 weeks and 9 months, respectively, after exploratory laparotomy. If these are taken as a proportion of the 18 patients who were under the age of 50 at the time of diagnosis then the incidence of the fibrolamellar type of hepatocellular carcinoma is 11%. Since then (in 1993) we have come across one further case, a woman of 39 who was well 22 months after operation though she had metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: The fibrolamellar type of hepatocellular carcinoma is rare, and all three of our cases were young women (under the age of 50). It seems to have a slightly better prognosis than other types of primary hepatic tumours.
PubMed ID
8781917 View in PubMed
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Hepatocellular carcinoma in Sweden: its association with viral hepatitis, especially with hepatitis C viral genotypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20427
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2000;32(2):147-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
A. Widell
H. Verbaan
R. Wejstål
J. Kaczynski
K. Kidd-Ljunggren
S. Wallerstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2000;32(2):147-52
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Donors
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology - virology
Comparative Study
Emigration and Immigration
Genotype
Hepacivirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis B Core Antigens - blood
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - blood
Hepatitis B virus - genetics - isolation & purification
Hepatitis B, Chronic - complications
Hepatitis C, Chronic - complications
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Viremia
Abstract
Viral markers of chronic hepatitis were tested for in 95 frozen serum samples from 299 patients from Malmö, Sweden, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), diagnosed between 1977 and 1994. Hepatitis B analysis included anti-HBc, HBsAg and, if anti-HBc positive, HBV DNA. Hepatitis C infection analysis included anti-HCV screening, RIBA, HCV RNA and HCV genotyping. HCV genotyping was also carried out in 9 HCV-viraemic HCC-patients from Gothenburg. HCV genotype distribution in HCC cases was compared with Swedish HCV-infected blood donors. Among the 95 patients from Malmö, 28 (29%) had anti-HBc, but only 5 (5%) were chronic HBV carriers, compared with 16 (17%) with chronic hepatitis C (p = 0.021). HCV-related HCC was more common among immigrants (8/16 vs. 8/79; p
PubMed ID
10826899 View in PubMed
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Incidence of primary liver cancer and aetiological aspects: a study of a defined population from a low-endemicity area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22960
Source
Br J Cancer. 1996 Jan;73(1):128-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
J. Kaczynski
G. Hansson
S. Wallerstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Ostra Sjukhuset, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1996 Jan;73(1):128-32
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Child
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence of primary liver cancer (PLC) varies throughout the world. It has been attributed to variations in incidence of the predominant histological type, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The incidence of PLC types other than HCC such as cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) is far less known, especially in low-incidence areas. The aetiology of HCC and other PLC types is obscure, with the exception of the association between HCC and cirrhosis as well as chronic viral hepatitis. The present retrospective incidence and aetiology study concerns a well-defined population from a period with a high autopsy frequency. Preserved biopsy specimens were re-evaluated histopathologically and patient records were studied. Among 590 histologically verified cases of PLC, HCC constituted 90%, CCC 8% and a mixed form of these types 1%. At the end of the study period the annual age-standardised incidence rate of HCC was 3.6 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Other PLC types were hepatoblastoma (n = 3), fibrolamellar carcinoma (n = 2), angiosarcoma (n = 1) and infantile haemangioendothelioma (n = 1), each constituting less than 1% of the PLC cases. Comparing HCC with CCC we found that cirrhosis (70%) and alcoholism (21%) was significantly more frequent in HCC, and cholelithiasis was significantly more common (60%) in patients with CCC. In the majority of the PLC cases with liver cirrhosis this disorder was unknown before diagnosis of the tumour.
PubMed ID
8554975 View in PubMed
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Lack of correlation between hepatitis B virus infection and the increasing incidence of primary liver cancer in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25031
Source
Acta Oncol. 1991;30(7):811-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
J. Kaczynski
G. Hansson
G. Norkrans
S. Wallerstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Ostra Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1991;30(7):811-3
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Female
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - immunology
Hepatitis B Core Antigens - analysis
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - analysis
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Incidence
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence of primary carcinoma of the liver in Sweden has been reported to increase. In order to study the role of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection for liver cancer development 40 cases with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were examined for the presence of HBV surface antigen and HBV core antigen in the cancer and in the surrounding non-neoplastic liver tissue. It was not possible to demonstrate a single case with tissue HBV antigen, indicating that HBV plays a minor role in the etiology of HCC in Sweden and thus does not seem to be responsible for the increasing incidence of this cancer.
PubMed ID
1662521 View in PubMed
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Minor role of hepatitis B and C virus infection in the etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma in a low-endemic area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11197
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1996 Aug;31(8):809-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
J. Kaczynski
G. Hansson
S. Hermodsson
R. Olsson
S. Wallerstedt
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Medicine, University of Göteborg, Ostra Sjukhuset, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1996 Aug;31(8):809-13
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - complications
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - etiology - pathology - virology
Chronic Disease
Female
Hepacivirus - isolation & purification
Hepatitis Antibodies - analysis
Hepatitis Antigens - analysis
Hepatitis B - complications - epidemiology
Hepatitis B virus - isolation & purification
Hepatitis C - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - complications
Liver Neoplasms - etiology - pathology - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The etiologic role of hepatitis B (HBV) and C virus (HCV) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a low-endemicity area is obscure. METHODS: Patients suspected of having primary liver cancer (PLC) in G?teborg, Sweden (n = 113), were tested serologically for HBV surface antigen and antibodies to HBV surface and core antigens. The presence of HBV surface and core antigens in cancer and non-neoplastic liver tissue in HCC cases was investigated immunohistochemically. Antibodies to HCV were tested by third-generation tests. The prevalence of HBV and HCV infection was compared in 73 patients with HCC and 32 patients with a final diagnosis other than PLC. RESULTS: No patient had signs of chronic HBV infection. Seven of 64 (11%) HCC patients were anti-HCV-positive, compared with 1 of 31 (3%) without PLC. All seven patients with HCC and HCV infection had liver cirrhosis, and two were alcoholics. Alcoholism was judged the commonest (42%) cause of cirrhosis. CONCLUSION: Contrary to areas with a high incidence of HCC, chronic viral hepatitis, particularly HBV, seems to play a minor etiologic role for HCC in Sweden compared with alcohol-related cirrhosis.
PubMed ID
8858752 View in PubMed
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Registration of liver cancer data--a study on the reliability of the Swedish Cancer Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25691
Source
Acta Oncol. 1989;28(5):716-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
J. Kaczynski
S. Wallerstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Ostra Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1989;28(5):716-7
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
2590550 View in PubMed
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The rising incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20902
Source
N Engl J Med. 1999 Aug 5;341(6):451; author reply 452
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-5-1999
Author
J. Kaczynski
A. Odén
Source
N Engl J Med. 1999 Aug 5;341(6):451; author reply 452
Date
Aug-5-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Humans
Incidence
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: N Engl J Med. 1999 Mar 11;340(10):745-5010072408
PubMed ID
10438267 View in PubMed
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[Structured care program yielded good results in severe anorexia nervosa]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61790
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 31;97(22):2734-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-31-2000
Author
J. Kaczynski
H. Denison
A. Wiknertz
L. Ryno
N. Hjalmers
Author Affiliation
Gastrosektionen, medicinska kliniken, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset/Ostra, Göteborg. jerzy.kaczynski@sahlgrenska.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 31;97(22):2734-7
Date
May-31-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - diet therapy - psychology - therapy
Body mass index
English Abstract
Enteral Nutrition - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intubation, Gastrointestinal
Length of Stay
Male
Patient Care Planning
Questionnaires
Regional Medical Programs
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Between 1994 and 1998, 19 patients averaging 21 years of age (range 17-24) with severe anorexia nervosa were treated according to a special protocol including enteral nutrition by the nasogastric route, firmly implemented supervisory strategies and simultaneous psychiatric support. Mean body mass index increased from 13.8 (10.4-16.3) at admission to 15.2 (13.0-18.2) at discharge after an average hospital stay of 24 days. No serious complications occurred. At a follow-up in 1999, a questionnaire concerning the protocol was answered by 13 of the patients. Most of them experienced the hospital stay as trying, but retrospectively perceived the tube feeding and supervisory strategies as necessary.
PubMed ID
10900894 View in PubMed
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[Substantial increase in primary liver cancer in women in Gothenburg]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12849
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 Nov 16;80(46):4400-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-16-1983

10 records – page 1 of 1.