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1H NMR studies on human plasma lipids from newborn infants, healthy adults, and adults with tumors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25704
Source
Magn Reson Med. 1989 Jan;9(1):35-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
S. Eskelinen
Y. Hiltunen
J. Jokisaari
S. Virtanen
K. Kiviniitty
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Physics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Magn Reson Med. 1989 Jan;9(1):35-8
Date
Jan-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Hydrogen
Infant, Newborn - blood
Lactates - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - diagnostic use
Male
Methane - blood
Neoplasms - blood
Protons
Abstract
The 1H NMR spectra of the lipid region of human plasma from healthy adults, neonates, and patients with malignant and nonmalignant tumors have been recorded on a JNM-GX400 FT spectrometer operating at 399.6 MHz for protons. The chemical shifts of methylene and methyl groups of plasma lipids were measured with respect to the higher field component of the methyl proton resonance of the lactate molecule. The results show that there are changes in the chemical shifts of the methylene proton resonances among the plasma from healthy adults, adults with tumors, and neonates. The shifts observed in the case of cancer patients and neonates are in the direction opposite to the shift measured from the plasma of healthy adults. Thus, the observed changes cannot be explained by the activity in the cell proliferation of tissues which is high in the cases of both healthy neonates and patients with malignant tumors, but they most probably reflect the different lipoprotein compositions of neonates, healthy adults, and adults with tumors.
PubMed ID
2540395 View in PubMed
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Proton nuclear magnetic resonance lineshape studies on human blood plasma lipids from newborn infants, healthy adults, and adults with tumors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24410
Source
Magn Reson Med. 1992 Jul;26(1):89-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1992
Author
Y. Hiltunen
M. Ala-Korpela
J. Jokisaari
S. Eskelinen
K. Kiviniitty
Author Affiliation
Department of Physics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Magn Reson Med. 1992 Jul;26(1):89-99
Date
Jul-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - blood
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lipoproteins - blood
Lung Neoplasms - blood
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - diagnostic use
Middle Aged
Plasma - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The usefulness of proton NMR spectroscopy of human blood plasma for cancer research has been extensively studied in recent years. Two main starting points have been offered by Fossel et al. (N. Engl. J. Med. 315, 1369 (1986)) and Mountford et al. (FEBS Lett. 203, 164 (1986)). In this work the experimental proton NMR spectra of blood plasma were analyzed with the aid of the multivariate lineshape fitting method. An appropriate model structure, in terms of the various lipoprotein (VLDL, LDL, and HDL) signals, for the methylene region was used. Neonates, healthy adults, and adults with nonmalignant and malignant tumors were studied. The linewidth of the methylene region was found to be linearly dependent on the relative concentrations of the lipoproteins. The correlation coefficient was -0.89 (P less than 0.001) for VLDL and 0.88 (P less than 0.001) for HDL. A correlation between VLDL concentration and age, 0.76 (P less than 0.001), was also established. VLDL was modeled using two components. The half-linewidth of the lower field component was slightly elevated for the adults with large metastases. This might be in association with the fucose-containing proteolipid complex detected earlier in cancer cells or in sera of cancer patients. Some signals of this complex may fall in the same region of the spectra. The spectra for the neonates were indicated to be totally different from the adults. This and other related questions were explained by means of the model parameters and the relative concentrations of the lipoproteins VLDL, LDL, and HDL. The presented technique can be used as a rapid research tool for figuring out the relative concentrations of the lipoproteins in blood plasma and explaining the reasons behind the changes in the spectra.
PubMed ID
1625571 View in PubMed
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Quantification of metabolites from single-voxel in vivo 1H NMR data of normal human brain by means of time-domain data analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11357
Source
MAGMA. 1995 Sep-Dec;3(3-4):129-36
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Ala-Korpela
J P Usenius
J. Keisala
A. van den Boogaart
P. Vainio
J. Jokisaari
S. Soimakallio
R. Kauppinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
MAGMA. 1995 Sep-Dec;3(3-4):129-36
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aspartic Acid - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Brain - anatomy & histology - metabolism
Choline - metabolism
Comparative Study
Creatine - metabolism
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Protons
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Abstract
We present here a combination of time-domain signal analysis procedures for quantification of human brain in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy (MRS) data. The method is based on a separate removal of a residual water resonance followed by a frequency-selective time-domain line-shape fitting analysis of metabolite signals. Calculation of absolute metabolite concentrations was based on the internal water concentration as a reference. The estimated average metabolite concentrations acquired from six regions of normal human brain with a single-voxel spin-echo technique for the N-acetylaspartate, creatine, and choline-containing compounds were 11.4 +/- 1.0, 6.5 +/- 0.5, and 1.7 +/- 0.2 mumol kg-1 wet weight, respectively. The time-domain analyses of in vivo 1H MRS data from different brain regions with their specific characteristics demonstrate a case in which the use of frequency-domain methods pose serious difficulties.
PubMed ID
8749730 View in PubMed
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