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The association between anxiety and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels: results from the Northern Finland 1966 birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134521
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2011 Sep;26(6):363-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
T. Liukkonen
P. Räsänen
J. Jokelainen
M. Leinonen
M-R Järvelin
V B Meyer-Rochow
M. Timonen
Author Affiliation
Savonlinna Central Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Keskussairaalantie 6, 57120 Savonlinna, Finland. timo.liukkonen@isshp.fi
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2011 Sep;26(6):363-9
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - blood - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - blood - epidemiology
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Comorbidity
Depression - blood - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - blood - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
Anxiety frequently accompanies low-grade inflammation-associated conditions like depression, insulin resistance, coronary heart disease and metabolic syndrome. The association between anxiety and low-grade inflammation is, unlike between depression and low-grade inflammation, a very sparsely studied area in general populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether anxiety symptoms as well as comorbid anxiety and depressive symptoms are associated with low-grade inflammation at population level.
The general population-based Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort was followed until age 31 (n=2688 males and 2837 females), when the highly sensitive CRP concentrations were measured. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were defined by Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25).
After adjusting for confounders, logistic regression analyses showed that anxiety symptoms alone increased the probability for elevated hs-CRP levels (>3.0mg/L) in males over two-fold (2.19 CI 95% 1.08-4.46), while comorbid anxiety and depressive symptoms caused a 1.7-fold (1.76 CI 95% 1.13-2.74) increase in the probability for elevated hs-CRP levels (1.0-3.0mg/L).
Our results support the hypothesis that anxiety as well as comorbid anxiety and depression can be associated with an increased risk for low-grade inflammation in males at population level.
PubMed ID
21570260 View in PubMed
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Association between high-sensitive measurement of C-reactive protein and metabolic syndrome as defined by International Diabetes Federation, National Cholesterol Education Program, and World Health Organization criteria in a population-based cohort of 55-year-old Finnish individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167723
Source
Diabetes Care. 2006 Sep;29(9):2177-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006

Association between symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and depression: an epidemiological study of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46085
Source
Cranio. 2001 Jul;19(3):183-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
K. Sipilä
J. Veijola
J. Jokelainen
M R Järvelin
K S Oikarinen
A M Raustia
M. Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Dept of Prosthetic Dentistry and Stomatognathic Physiology, Finland. kirsir@cc.oulu.fi
Source
Cranio. 2001 Jul;19(3):183-7
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Facial Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Facial pain and other symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are rather common in the adult population. According to clinical studies, psychological factors play an important role in the etiology and maintenance of these symptoms. On the other hand, chronic pain can cause depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between symptoms of TMD and depression in a large population sample of young adults. The study was a part of the 31-year follow-up study of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort consisting of 12,058 live births from the year 1966. Questionnaire information concerning TMD symptoms was collected from a subsample of 5,696 subjects. Depression was measured with a question about reported depression (diagnosed by a doctor) and with the Symptom Checklist depression subscale (SCL-25 DS). Of the TMD symptoms, those related to pain had the most significant relations to indicators of depression. In both genders, the proportion of depression indicated with the SCL-25 DS was significantly higher in subjects with pain-related symptoms of TMD, i.e., facial pain and "pain at jaw rest", and in men with "pain on jaw movement", compared with non-pain subjects (p0.05), except "difficulties in mouth opening" among women. Among women, the prevalence of recognized depression was also significantly higher in subjects with pain-related symptoms of TMD, compared with subjects with no pain (p
PubMed ID
11482830 View in PubMed
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Association of symptoms of TMD and orofacial pain with alexithymia: an epidemiological study of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46063
Source
Cranio. 2001 Oct;19(4):246-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
K. Sipilä
J. Veijola
J. Jokelainen
M R Järvelin
K S Oikarinen
A M Raustia
M. Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Prosthetic Dentistry and Stomatognathic Physiology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. kirsir@cc.oulu.fi
Source
Cranio. 2001 Oct;19(4):246-51
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Depression - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Studies
Facial Pain - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - epidemiology
Tongue Diseases - epidemiology
Toothache - epidemiology
Abstract
Alexithymia is a term denoting a deficit in the ability to differentiate emotional from physical states and to identify and describe one's feelings, as well as a preference for external oriented thinking. Alexithymia has been linked with various somatic and psychosomatic diseases, especially with chronic pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between alexithymia and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) as well as oro-lingual and dental pain, in a large representative population sample of young adults. The study was a part of the 31-year follow-up study of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort originally consisting of 12058 live births in the year 1966. In 1997, 4893 subjects living in northern Finland or in the capital area, who participated in a field study of the project and later returned a postal questionnaire, made up the sample of this study. Information concerning symptoms of TMD and oro-lingual and dental pain was collected from the subjects. To assess alexithymia, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20) was used. In addition, information about depression, marital status and self-rated health was collected. The proportion of alexithymics (TAS score over 60) was higher in subjects with the most orofacial symptoms than in asymptomatic subjects. In men, alexithymia associated significantly with facial pain, difficulties in mouth opening, oro-lingual pain and dental pain, and in women with pain on jaw movement and dental pain. After adjusting for depression, marital status, and self-rated health, a significant association remained between alexithymia and the symptoms mentioned, except for facial pain in men. It can be concluded that alexithymia is connected with orofacial symptoms. Clinicians treating these symptoms should be familiar with the concept of alexithymia.
PubMed ID
11725848 View in PubMed
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Atopy and depression: results from the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45898
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2003 Aug;8(8):738-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
M. Timonen
J. Jokelainen
H. Hakko
S. Silvennoinen-Kassinen
V B Meyer-Rochow
A. Herva
P. Räsänen
Author Affiliation
Health Center, City of Oulu, Finland. markku.timonen@oulu.fi
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2003 Aug;8(8):738-44
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Several studies have suggested an association between IgE-mediated atopic allergies and depression. The present study extends our understanding about putative gender differences of this association and provides further epidemiological evidence for our previous finding that the association between atopy and depression may be characteristic for females only. In order to clearly determine the presence of atopic disorders and depression, we used more valid tools than had been employed earlier and we had access to a database (the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort), in which individuals were followed up prospectively until the age of 31 years. The information on allergic symptoms, verified by skin-prick tests and comprising data of 5518 individuals, was used to ascertain the presence of atopy. Depression was assessed with the help of Hopkins' Symptom Checklist-25 and self-reported doctor-diagnosed depression. After adjusting for a father's social class, mother's parity, and place of residence, logistic regression analyses showed that the risk of developing depression increased in parallel with the increasing severity of depression and, when compared with nonatopic subjects, was 3.0 to 4.7-fold up in atopic females and statistically significant. In atopic males, the association between atopy and depression was statistically significant only in the highest depression scores, the odds ratio being 6.3-fold. The results indicate that females suffering from atopic diseases might possess an elevated risk of developing depression already during early adulthood. In males, the association between these two disorders is evident only among the most severe manifestations of depression. Possible background theories, that is, genetic abnormalities in serotonin metabolism, HPA-axis dysfunction, and histamine theory are discussed.
Notes
Comment In: Mol Psychiatry. 2003 Aug;8(8):711-212888795
PubMed ID
12888802 View in PubMed
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Birth order and risk for schizophrenia: a 31-year follow-up of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63801
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2001 Aug;104(2):148-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
L. Kemppainen
J. Veijola
J. Jokelainen
A L Hartikainen
M R Järvelin
P. Jones
T. Croudace
M. Isohanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2001 Aug;104(2):148-52
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Order
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - etiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort was studied in order to investigate the association between birth order and schizophrenia. METHOD: Four categories of birth order status (first-born, last-born, only child and other status) were formed and linked to data on psychiatric morbidity. Effects were adjusted for wantedness of pregnancy, perinatal complications, maternal age at delivery, family type and number of siblings. RESULTS: The risk for schizophrenia was elevated among male first-borns (ratio 1.5; 95% CI 1.0-2.2) and female last-borns (ratio 1.3; 95% CI 0.9-1.9). The risk was lower than expected among male last-borns (ratio 0.7; 95% CI 0.5-0.9) and females belonging to other status (ratio 0.6; 95% CI 0.3-0.9). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that specific birth order status is an independent risk factor for schizophrenia. Theoretical explanations may arise from biological factors unidentified here and/or psychological stressors linked with these positions.
PubMed ID
11473509 View in PubMed
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Can excellent school performance be a precursor of schizophrenia? A 28-year follow-up in the Northern Finland 1966 birth cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201185
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Jul;100(1):17-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
I. Isohanni
M R Järvelin
P. Jones
J. Jokelainen
M. Isohanni
Author Affiliation
Oulu Polytechnic, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Jul;100(1):17-26
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Morbidity - trends
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
Poor scholastic performance is known to pre-date adult schizophrenia. We studied the 1966 North Finland general population birth cohort (n = 11017) in order to determine whether excellent school performance was a risk or protective factor.
Data on school marks at the age of 16 years were linked to data on psychiatric morbidity. In total, 89 subjects (58 boys) developed DSM-III-R schizophrenia between the ages of 16 and 28 years.
Six (11%) of the pre-schizophrenic boys (6/54) had excellent mean school marks, compared to only 3% (166/5245) of the comparison group (OR 3.8; 95% CI 1.6-9.3, adjusted for parental social class, place of residence and birth order).
These results may be a chance phenomenon and require replication. However, adult schizophrenia may be linked to excellent school performance. This result may be relevant both to the preservation of schizophrenia in the population, and to mechanisms of developing schizophrenia.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Jul;100(1):1-210442433
PubMed ID
10442435 View in PubMed
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Changes in glucose metabolism in people with different glucose metabolism disorders at baseline: follow-up results of a Finnish national diabetes prevention programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277251
Source
Diabet Med. 2015 Dec;32(12):1611-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
N. Rautio
J. Jokelainen
H. Oksa
T. Saaristo
M. Peltonen
H. Puolijoki
J. Tuomilehto
M. Vanhala
L. Moilanen
M. Uusitupa
S. Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Source
Diabet Med. 2015 Dec;32(12):1611-6
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Body mass index
Combined Modality Therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Diet, Diabetic
Diet, Reducing
Disease Progression
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - complications - diet therapy - physiopathology - therapy
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Nutrition Policy
Overweight - complications - diet therapy - drug therapy - therapy
Patient compliance
Prediabetic State - complications - diet therapy - physiopathology - therapy
Primary Health Care
Risk
Weight Loss
Abstract
To examine changes in glucose metabolism (fasting and 2-h glucose) during follow-up in people with impaired fasting glucose in comparison with changes in people with isolated impaired glucose tolerance, people with impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance combined and people with screening-detected Type 2 diabetes at baseline, among those who participated in a diabetes prevention programme conducted in Finland.
A total of 10 149 people at high risk of Type 2 diabetes took part in baseline examination. Of 5351 individuals with follow-up = 9 months, 1727 had impaired glucose metabolism at baseline and completed at least one lifestyle intervention visit. Most of them (94.6%) were overweight/ obese.
Fasting glucose decreased during follow-up among overweight/obese people in the combined impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance group (P = 0.044), as did 2-h glucose in people in the isolated impaired glucose tolerance group (P = 0.0014) after adjustment for age, sex, medication and weight at baseline, follow-up time and changes in weight, physical activity and diet. When comparing changes in glucose metabolism among people with different degrees of glucose metabolism impairment, fasting glucose concentration was found to have increased in those with isolated impaired glucose tolerance (0.12 mmol/l, 95% Cl 0.05 to 0.19) and it decreased to a greater extent in those with screening-detected Type 2 diabetes (-0.54 mmol/l, 95% Cl -0.69 to -0.39) compared with those with impaired fasting glucose (-0.21 mmol/l, 95% Cl -0.27 to -0.15). Furthermore, 2-h glucose concentration decreased in the isolated impaired glucose tolerance group (-0.82 mmol/l, 95% Cl -1.04 to -0.60), in the combined impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance group (-0.82 mmol/l, 95% Cl -1.07 to -0.58) and in the screening-detected Type 2 diabetes group (-1.52, 95% Cl -1.96 to -1.08) compared with those in the impaired fasting glucose group (0.26 mmol/l, 95% Cl 0.10 to 0.43). Results were statistically significant even after adjustment for covariates (P
PubMed ID
25864699 View in PubMed
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Depressive symptoms and insulin resistance in young adult males: results from the Northern Finland 1966 birth cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76199
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2006 May 9;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-9-2006
Author
M. Timonen
U. Rajala
J. Jokelainen
S. Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
V B Meyer-Rochow
P. Räsänen
Author Affiliation
1Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2006 May 9;
Date
May-9-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The association between insulin resistance (IR) and depression is a subject of growing research interest, especially as previous population-based studies have presented conflicting findings. The present study extends our understanding about the putative impact of the severity of depressive symptoms on this association and it provides further epidemiological evidence in support of earlier findings, suggesting that the association between IR and depression is present already in young adult males. To determine the impact of the severity of depressive symptoms on the putative association between IR and depression in young adult males, we were given access to the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort database. During the 31-year follow-up survey of this genetically homogeneous birth cohort, IR was assessed by 'Qualitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index' (QUICKI), and severity of depressive symptoms by 'Hopkins' Symptom Checklist-25' (HSCL-25). This study involved 2609 male cohort members with complete variable information. In men, the means of the QUICKI-values decreased (i.e., IR increased) in line with the increased severity of depressive symptoms as assessed by HSCL-25 subgroups (analysis of covariance P-value for trend, P=0.003). In multivariate generalized logistic regression analyses, after adjusting for confounders, IR was positively associated with current severe depressive symptoms, the odds ratio (OR) being over threefold (adjusted OR 3.15, 95% confidence interval 1.48-6.68) and the value of OR increased in parallel with a tighter definition of IR (P-value for trend=0.007). The results indicate that in young males, a positive association exists specifically with severe depressive symptoms.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 9 May 2006; doi:10.1038/sj.mp.4001838.
PubMed ID
16702975 View in PubMed
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Depressive symptoms predispose females to metabolic syndrome: a 7-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154164
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2009 Feb;119(2):137-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
M. Vanhala
J. Jokelainen
S. Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
E. Kumpusalo
H. Koponen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Family Practice, Central Hospital of Middle Finland, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2009 Feb;119(2):137-42
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Causality
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To evaluate the risk for developing metabolic syndrome when having depressive symptoms.
The prevalence of depressive symptoms and metabolic syndrome at baseline, and after a 7-year follow-up as measured with Beck depression inventory (BDI), and using the modified National Cholesterol Education Program--Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for metabolic syndrome (MetS) were studied in a middle-aged population-based sample (n = 1294).
The logistic regression analysis showed a 2.5-fold risk (95% CI: 1.2-5.2) for the females with depressive symptoms (BDI >or=10) at baseline to have MetS at the end of the follow-up. The risk was highest in the subgroup with more melancholic symptoms evaluated with a summary score of the melancholic items in BDI (OR 6.81, 95% CI: 2.09-22.20). In men, there was no risk difference.
The higher risks for MetS in females with depressive symptoms at baseline suggest that depression may be an important predisposing factor for the development of MetS.
PubMed ID
19016666 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.