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All-time releases of mercury to the atmosphere from human activities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129775
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Dec 15;45(24):10485-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2011
Author
David G Streets
Molly K Devane
Zifeng Lu
Tami C Bond
Elsie M Sunderland
Daniel J Jacob
Author Affiliation
Decision and Information Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, United States. dstreets@anl.gov
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Dec 15;45(24):10485-91
Date
Dec-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Atmosphere - chemistry
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Mercury - analysis
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Power Plants - statistics & numerical data
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Pollution, Chemical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Understanding the biogeochemical cycling of mercury is critical for explaining the presence of mercury in remote regions of the world, such as the Arctic and the Himalayas, as well as local concentrations. While we have good knowledge of present-day fluxes of mercury to the atmosphere, we have little knowledge of what emission levels were like in the past. Here we develop a trend of anthropogenic emissions of mercury to the atmosphere from 1850 to 2008-for which relatively complete data are available-and supplement that trend with an estimate of anthropogenic emissions prior to 1850. Global mercury emissions peaked in 1890 at 2600 Mg yr(-1), fell to 700-800 Mg yr(-1) in the interwar years, then rose steadily after 1950 to present-day levels of 2000 Mg yr(-1). Our estimate for total mercury emissions from human activities over all time is 350 Gg, of which 39% was emitted before 1850 and 61% after 1850. Using an eight-compartment global box-model of mercury biogeochemical cycling, we show that these emission trends successfully reproduce present-day atmospheric enrichment in mercury.
Notes
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2002 Jun 1;36(11):2303-1012075781
Cites: Chemosphere. 2002 Jul;48(1):51-712137057
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2003 Jan 1;37(1):22-3112542286
Cites: J Environ Monit. 2003 Dec;5(6):935-4914710936
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Sep 1;40(17):5312-816999104
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Mar 15;45(6):2042-721355558
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2008 Aug 15;42(16):5971-718767653
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Apr 15;43(8):2983-819475981
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Jun 2;106(22):8830-419451629
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Apr 15;44(8):2918-2420345131
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Nov 15;44(22):8574-8020973542
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2007 Nov 15;41(22):7632-818075067
PubMed ID
22070723 View in PubMed
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Brown Norway chromosome 13 confers protection from high salt to consomic Dahl S rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10276
Source
Hypertension. 2001 Feb;37(2 Part 2):456-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
A W Cowley
R J Roman
M L Kaldunski
P. Dumas
J G Dickhout
A S Greene
H J Jacob
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, USA. cowley@mcw.edu
Source
Hypertension. 2001 Feb;37(2 Part 2):456-61
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiotensin II
Animals
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Fibrosis
Furosemide
Gene Therapy
Gene Transfer Techniques
Genotype
Hypertension - genetics - therapy - urine
Kidney Glomerulus - drug effects - pathology
Kidney Medulla - drug effects - pathology
Kidney Tubules - drug effects - pathology
Necrosis
Norepinephrine
Proteinuria - urine
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN - genetics
Rats, Inbred Dahl - genetics
Renal Artery - drug effects
Renin - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sclerosis
Sodium Chloride - administration & dosage - toxicity
Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage - toxicity
Vascular Resistance - drug effects
Abstract
Consomic rats (SS.BN13), in which chromosome 13 from normotensive inbred Brown Norway rats from a colony maintained at the Medical College of Wisconsin (BN/Mcw) was introgressed into the background of Dahl salt-sensitive (SS/Mcw) rats, also maintained in a colony at the Medical College of Wisconsin, were bred. The present studies determined the mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses to salt and renal and peripheral vascular responses to norepinephrine and angiotensin II; 24-hour protein excretion and histological analyses were used to assess renal pathology in rats that received a high salt (4% NaCl) diet for 4 weeks. MAP of rats measured daily during the fourth week averaged 170+/-3.3 mm Hg in SS/Mcw rats, 119+/-2.1 mm Hg in SS.BN13 rats, and 103+/-1.3 mm Hg in BN/Mcw rats. After salt depletion, MAP fell an average of 27+/-4.5 mm Hg in SS/Mcw rats, 9+/-2.6 mm Hg in SS.BN13 rats, and 11+/-3.0 mm Hg in BN/Mcw rats. Protein excretion of SS/Mcw rats on a high salt diet averaged 189+/-30 mg/24 h, 63+/-18 mg/24 h in SS.BN13 rats, and 40+/-6.4 mg/24 h in BN/Mcw rats. Compared with SS.BN13 and BN/Mcw rats, SS/Mcw rats exhibited significantly greater increases of renal vascular resistance in response to intravenous norepinephrine and angiotensin II. Severe medullary interstitial fibrosis and tubular necrosis after a high salt diet were found consistently in SS/Mcw rat kidneys but were largely absent in the SS.BN13 and BN/Mcw rat kidneys. A similar degree of glomerular sclerosis was found in both SS/Mcw and SS.BN13 rats. In rats fed a 0.4% salt diet, the glomerular filtration rate of SS/Mcw rats was significantly less than that of BN/Mcw and SS.BN13 rats. These results reveal a powerful gene, or set of genes, within chromosome 13 of BN/Mcw rats that confers protection from the detrimental effects of high salt to the SS/Mcw rats.
PubMed ID
11230318 View in PubMed
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Cesarean deliveries: when is a pediatrician necessary?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3192
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Feb;89(2):217-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
J. Jacob
J. Pfenninger
Author Affiliation
Alaska Neonatology Associates, P.C., Anchorage, USA.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Feb;89(2):217-20
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia
Apgar score
Cesarean Section
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Pediatrics
Pregnancy
Resuscitation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the need for vigorous resuscitation (bag-and-mask ventilation, tracheal intubation, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation) in certain common cesarean deliveries at term to evaluate the need for pediatrician attendance on behalf of the fetus. METHODS: Records of singleton cesarean deliveries (repeat, nonprogressive labor, fetal malposition, fetal heart rate abnormality) at term over 2 years were reviewed for the following: need for vigorous resuscitation, Apgar scores, anesthesia used, and the need for newborn intensive care. The next consecutive, uncomplicated singleton vaginal delivery in each case was used to create a control group. Exclusion criteria included the presence of maternal disease (diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, placenta previa) or suspicion of fetal abnormalities (growth restriction, congenital defect, known meconium staining of the amniotic fluid). There were 834 cesarean deliveries and 834 controls (low-risk vaginal deliveries). RESULTS: Compared with vaginal deliveries, Apgar scores of 6 or less at 1 minute were more frequent in all cesarean deliveries except for the repeat cesarean category. The incidence of needing vigorous resuscitation was as follows: vaginal 1.7%, repeat 3.0%, nonprogressive labor 4.8%, fetal malposition 11.2%, and fetal heart rate abnormality 17.7%. The use of regional anesthesia reduced the need for vigorous resuscitation in cesarean deliveries for the repeat group and the group with nonprogressive labor without fetal heart rate abnormalities to a level similar to that in uncomplicated vaginal deliveries (2.1% repeat; 1.6% nonprogressive labor without fetal heart rate abnormality). CONCLUSIONS: Both repeat cesarean deliveries and cesareans done for nonprogressive labor without signs of fetal heart rate abnormality, when performed under regional anesthesia, may not need a pediatrician in attendance because of minimal fetal risk.
PubMed ID
9015023 View in PubMed
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Cost savings of regionalized perinatal care for low birthweight infants: Part II. Cost of hospitalization and morbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60190
Source
Alaska Med. 1986 Jul-Sep;28(3):53-6
Publication Type
Article

Cost savings of regionalized perinatal care for low birthweight infants: Part I. Mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60205
Source
Alaska Med. 1986 Apr-Jun;28(2):42-6
Publication Type
Article

Differences in serum glucose determinations in infants with umbilical artery catheters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60078
Source
J Perinatol. 1988;8(1):40-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
J. Jacob
R F Davis
Author Affiliation
Providence Hospital, Anchorage, Alaska.
Source
J Perinatol. 1988;8(1):40-2
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Flow Velocity
Blood Glucose - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Catheterization, Peripheral - methods
Glucose - administration & dosage
Humans
Infant, Newborn - blood
Leg
Umbilical Arteries
Abstract
Differences in serum glucose values obtained from different extremities in newborns with umbilical artery catheters (UAC) through which a dextrose solution was administered were studied. Control infants (n = 20) had no difference in simultaneous capillary glucose values obtained from both lower extremities. Infants with a low UAC had a significant difference between two (both lower extremities) or three (both lower and one upper extremity) simultaneous capillary glucose values. Infants with a high UAC did not. In the low UAC group, the serum glucose value was highest in the lower extremity through which the UAC entered the aorta and lowest in the upper extremity. The elevation in glucose value was related to the glucose infusion rate corrected for infant size (mg/kg/min). Clinicians caring for infants with low UACs should be aware of this potential error in order to prevent erroneous decision-making.
PubMed ID
3236093 View in PubMed
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Distribution of primary cancers of the liver in the Province of Qu├ębec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252503
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Feb 8;112(3):305-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-8-1975
Author
P J Jacob
G P Thériault
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Feb 8;112(3):305-7
Date
Feb-8-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental pollution
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
All records of primary liver cancer reported to the tumor registry of the Province of Québec from 1969 to 1972 were collected and were classified according to sex, age and place of residence. Men had higher incidence of primary liver cancer and the disease developed at an earlier age in men than it did in women. There was a noticeable difference in the number of cases in rural and urban areas, and a significant difference in the incidence in the 10 districts of the province. Cases in urban areas were clustered in a few industrialized cities. Our findings are in agreement with previous reports that show a relationship between primary cancer of the liver and the presence of chemicals in the environment.
Notes
Cites: Cancer Res. 1971 May;31(5):516-225582114
Cites: Nature. 1973 Jul 20;244(5412):176-84583503
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1973 Oct;51(4):1287-944355607
Cites: Cancer Res. 1973 Nov;33(11):2993-30014355988
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1972 Nov;10(3):489-5064358037
Cites: Nature. 1973 Oct 19;245(5425):386-94361368
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1963 May-Jun;24:265-7513929916
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1973 Sep;28(3):215-204743905
Cites: Lancet. 1974 Jun 29;1(7870):1316-84134297
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1961 Oct;22:354-6114042359
PubMed ID
1109747 View in PubMed
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Dynamic convergence and divergence of renal genomic and biological pathways in protection from Dahl salt-sensitive hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98608
Source
Physiol Genomics. 2010 Mar 3;41(1):63-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-3-2010
Author
Limin Lu
Peigang Li
Chun Yang
Terry Kurth
Michael Misale
Meredith Skelton
Carol Moreno
Richard J Roman
Andrew S Greene
Howard J Jacob
Jozef Lazar
Mingyu Liang
Allen W Cowley
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.
Source
Physiol Genomics. 2010 Mar 3;41(1):63-70
Date
Mar-3-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Albuminuria - complications - genetics
Animals
Animals, Congenic
Chromosomes, Mammalian - genetics
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation
Genome - genetics
Hypertension - complications - genetics - prevention & control
Inbreeding
Kidney - metabolism - pathology
Male
Phenotype
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Dahl
Reproducibility of Results
Signal Transduction - genetics
Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances - metabolism
Abstract
Chromosome 13 consomic and congenic rat strains were analyzed to investigate the pattern of genomic pathway utilization involved in protection against salt-sensitive hypertension and renal injury. Introgression of the entire Brown-Norway chromosome 13 (consomic SS-13(BN)) or nonoverlapping segments of this chromosome (congenic strains, 16 Mbp in D13Rat151-D13Rat197 or 14 Mbp in D13Rat111-D13Got22) into the genome of the Dahl salt-sensitive rat attenuated salt-induced hypertension and proteinuria. mRNA abundance profiles in the renal cortex and the renal medulla from rats receiving 0.4% or 8% NaCl diets revealed two important features of pathway recruitment in these rat strains. First, the two congenic strains shared alterations in several pathways compared with Dahl salt-sensitive rats, despite the fact that the genomic segments introgressed in the two congenic strains did not overlap. Second, even though the genomic segment introgressed in each congenic strain was a part of the chromosome introgressed in the consomic strain, pathways altered in each congenic strain were not simply a subset of those altered in the consomic. Supporting the relevance of the mRNA data, differential expression of oxidative stress-related genes among the four strains of rats was associated with differences in urinary excretion of lipid peroxidation products. The findings suggest that different genetic alterations might converge to influence shared pathways in protection from hypertension, and that, depending on the genomic context, the same genetic alteration might diverge to affect different pathways.
PubMed ID
20009007 View in PubMed
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Effect of colonoscopy on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality: an instrumental variable analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123837
Source
Gastrointest Endosc. 2012 Aug;76(2):355-64.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Binu J Jacob
Rahim Moineddin
Rinku Sutradhar
Nancy N Baxter
David R Urbach
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Gastrointest Endosc. 2012 Aug;76(2):355-64.e1
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Colonoscopy - utilization
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Early Detection of Cancer - methods - utilization
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Using population-based health services information to estimate the effectiveness of colonoscopy on colorectal cancer (CRC) outcomes is prone to selection bias.
To determine the effect of colonoscopy on CRC incidence and mortality.
Population-based retrospective cohort study.
Ontario provincial health data information.
This study involved average-risk persons aged 50 to 74 years from 1996 to 2000 who were alive and free of CRC on January 1, 2001.
Colonoscopy between 1996 and 2000.
CRC incidence and mortality from 2001 to 2007.
The study cohort contained 1,089,998 persons, 7.9% of whom had undergone a colonoscopy between 1996 and 2000. Using primary care physician rate of discretionary colonoscopy as an instrumental variable, the receipt of colonoscopy was associated with a 0.60% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31%-0.78%) absolute reduction in the 7-year colorectal cancer incidence and a 0.17% (95% CI, 0.14%-0.21%) absolute reduction in the 5-year risk of death caused by CRC. This corresponds to a 48% relative decrease in CRC incidence (risk ratio [RR] 0.52; 95% CI, 0.34-0.76) and 81% decrease in mortality caused by CRC (RR 0.19, 95% CI, 0.07-0.47). In subgroup analyses, the reduction in the risk of death due to CRC was larger in women than men. The reduction in CRC incidence was larger for complete colonoscopies and for left-sided cancers.
Instrumental variable methods estimate only the marginal effect on the population studied.
Increased use of colonoscopy procedures is associated with a reduction in the incidence and mortality of CRC in the population studied.
Notes
Comment In: Gastrointest Endosc. 2012 Aug;76(2):365-622817788
PubMed ID
22658386 View in PubMed
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Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74909
Source
Nature. 2004 Apr 1;428(6982):493-521
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2004
Author
Richard A Gibbs
George M Weinstock
Michael L Metzker
Donna M Muzny
Erica J Sodergren
Steven Scherer
Graham Scott
David Steffen
Kim C Worley
Paula E Burch
Geoffrey Okwuonu
Sandra Hines
Lora Lewis
Christine DeRamo
Oliver Delgado
Shannon Dugan-Rocha
George Miner
Margaret Morgan
Alicia Hawes
Rachel Gill
Celera
Robert A Holt
Mark D Adams
Peter G Amanatides
Holly Baden-Tillson
Mary Barnstead
Soo Chin
Cheryl A Evans
Steve Ferriera
Carl Fosler
Anna Glodek
Zhiping Gu
Don Jennings
Cheryl L Kraft
Trixie Nguyen
Cynthia M Pfannkoch
Cynthia Sitter
Granger G Sutton
J Craig Venter
Trevor Woodage
Douglas Smith
Hong-Mei Lee
Erik Gustafson
Patrick Cahill
Arnold Kana
Lynn Doucette-Stamm
Keith Weinstock
Kim Fechtel
Robert B Weiss
Diane M Dunn
Eric D Green
Robert W Blakesley
Gerard G Bouffard
Pieter J De Jong
Kazutoyo Osoegawa
Baoli Zhu
Marco Marra
Jacqueline Schein
Ian Bosdet
Chris Fjell
Steven Jones
Martin Krzywinski
Carrie Mathewson
Asim Siddiqui
Natasja Wye
John McPherson
Shaying Zhao
Claire M Fraser
Jyoti Shetty
Sofiya Shatsman
Keita Geer
Yixin Chen
Sofyia Abramzon
William C Nierman
Paul H Havlak
Rui Chen
K James Durbin
Amy Egan
Yanru Ren
Xing-Zhi Song
Bingshan Li
Yue Liu
Xiang Qin
Simon Cawley
A J Cooney
Lisa M D'Souza
Kirt Martin
Jia Qian Wu
Manuel L Gonzalez-Garay
Andrew R Jackson
Kenneth J Kalafus
Michael P McLeod
Aleksandar Milosavljevic
Davinder Virk
Andrei Volkov
David A Wheeler
Zhengdong Zhang
Jeffrey A Bailey
Evan E Eichler
Eray Tuzun
Ewan Birney
Emmanuel Mongin
Abel Ureta-Vidal
Cara Woodwark
Evgeny Zdobnov
Peer Bork
Mikita Suyama
David Torrents
Marina Alexandersson
Barbara J Trask
Janet M Young
Hui Huang
Huajun Wang
Heming Xing
Sue Daniels
Darryl Gietzen
Jeanette Schmidt
Kristian Stevens
Ursula Vitt
Jim Wingrove
Francisco Camara
M. Mar Albà
Josep F Abril
Roderic Guigo
Arian Smit
Inna Dubchak
Edward M Rubin
Olivier Couronne
Alexander Poliakov
Norbert Hübner
Detlev Ganten
Claudia Goesele
Oliver Hummel
Thomas Kreitler
Young-Ae Lee
Jan Monti
Herbert Schulz
Heike Zimdahl
Heinz Himmelbauer
Hans Lehrach
Howard J Jacob
Susan Bromberg
Jo Gullings-Handley
Michael I Jensen-Seaman
Anne E Kwitek
Jozef Lazar
Dean Pasko
Peter J Tonellato
Simon Twigger
Chris P Ponting
Jose M Duarte
Stephen Rice
Leo Goodstadt
Scott A Beatson
Richard D Emes
Eitan E Winter
Caleb Webber
Petra Brandt
Gerald Nyakatura
Margaret Adetobi
Francesca Chiaromonte
Laura Elnitski
Pallavi Eswara
Ross C Hardison
Minmei Hou
Diana Kolbe
Kateryna Makova
Webb Miller
Anton Nekrutenko
Cathy Riemer
Scott Schwartz
James Taylor
Shan Yang
Yi Zhang
Klaus Lindpaintner
T Dan Andrews
Mario Caccamo
Michele Clamp
Laura Clarke
Valerie Curwen
Richard Durbin
Eduardo Eyras
Stephen M Searle
Gregory M Cooper
Serafim Batzoglou
Michael Brudno
Arend Sidow
Eric A Stone
Bret A Payseur
Guillaume Bourque
Carlos López-Otín
Xose S Puente
Kushal Chakrabarti
Sourav Chatterji
Colin Dewey
Lior Pachter
Nicolas Bray
Von Bing Yap
Anat Caspi
Glenn Tesler
Pavel A Pevzner
David Haussler
Krishna M Roskin
Robert Baertsch
Hiram Clawson
Terrence S Furey
Angie S Hinrichs
Donna Karolchik
William J Kent
Kate R Rosenbloom
Heather Trumbower
Matt Weirauch
David N Cooper
Peter D Stenson
Bin Ma
Michael Brent
Manimozhiyan Arumugam
David Shteynberg
Richard R Copley
Martin S Taylor
Harold Riethman
Uma Mudunuri
Jane Peterson
Mark Guyer
Adam Felsenfeld
Susan Old
Stephen Mockrin
Francis Collins
Author Affiliation
Human Genome Sequencing Center, Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, MS BCM226, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA .
Source
Nature. 2004 Apr 1;428(6982):493-521
Date
Apr-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Base Composition
Centromere - genetics
Chromosomes, Mammalian - genetics
CpG Islands - genetics
DNA Transposable Elements - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Evolution, Molecular
Gene Duplication
Genome
Genomics
Humans
Introns - genetics
Male
Mice
Models, Molecular
Mutagenesis
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
RNA Splice Sites - genetics
RNA, Untranslated - genetics
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN - genetics
Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Retroelements - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Telomere - genetics
Abstract
The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90% of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2004 Apr 1;428(6982):475-615057812
PubMed ID
15057822 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.