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Actinic prurigo: clinical features and prognosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223861
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992 May;26(5 Pt 1):683-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
P R Lane
D J Hogan
M J Martel
B. Reeder
J. Irvine
Author Affiliation
Division of Dermatology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992 May;26(5 Pt 1):683-92
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Photosensitivity Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prognosis
Prurigo - diagnosis - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Abstract
Actinic prurigo, an idiopathic familial photodermatosis, has been described in Amerindians in Manitoba, Canada, as well as in the United States, Mexico, and South America.
Our purpose was to describe the clinical features and prognosis of actinic prurigo in Amerindians in Saskatchewan, Canada.
Clinical examinations, questionnaires, phototesting, and laboratory tests were used.
We present a series of 93 Amerindian patients. The face is the most commonly involved area. A hereditary tendency, cheilitis, and pruritus are prominent features. One third of patients report some lesions, often minor, during the winter. The majority of patients phototested were sensitive to ultraviolet A light.
We find the age of onset of actinic prurigo to be the most important feature in determining the type of eruption and the prognosis for the patient. In general the younger ages of onset (up to 20 years of age) are associated with cheilitis and more acute eruptions and are more likely to improve over 5 years. Those who develop actinic prurigo as adults (21 years of age and older) tend to have a milder and more persistent dermatosis.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Acad Dermatol. 1997 Mar;36(3 Pt 1):504-59091504
PubMed ID
1583166 View in PubMed
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Source
Am J Dermatopathol. 1993 Aug;15(4):326-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
P R Lane
F. Murphy
D J Hogan
P R Hull
W H Burgdorf
Author Affiliation
Division of Dermatology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Am J Dermatopathol. 1993 Aug;15(4):326-31
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arm
Basement Membrane - pathology
Dermatitis - pathology
Edema - pathology
Eosinophils - pathology
Epithelium - pathology
Erythrocytes - pathology
Ethnic Groups
Facial Dermatoses - pathology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - pathology
Humans
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Indians, North American
Keratosis - pathology
Lip Diseases - pathology
Lymphocytes - pathology
Male
Neck
Prurigo - ethnology - pathology
Saskatchewan
Abstract
Actinic prurigo (AP) is an idiopathic familial photodermatosis seen in American Indians. We report on 17 patients; 16 had dermatitis and one had actinic cheilitis. Ten patients had acute dermatitis and six had chronic dermatitis. The histologies of acute AP and polymorphous light eruption (PLE; limited concept) are eczematous and indistinguishable. Both show spongiosis, superficial (and sometimes deep) perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates, and papillary dermal edema. Both also show vacuolar degeneration of the basal layer. In contrast, the chronic lichenified AP lesions are associated with marked hyperkeratosis, acanthosis, elongation of the rete ridges, and tissue repair. The large lymphoid germinal centers in the lamina propria are the main features of the lip histology. Seven biopsies were positive in the basal membrane zone on direct immunofluorescent testing, four were negative, and one was inconclusive. IgM was present in six and C3 in two. These immunofluorescent results are probably not significant. Immunofluorescent testing of the lip was negative. Although it is not possible to distinguish acute AP from PLE histologically, it is possible to differentiate the two conditions when chronic AP changes are present.
PubMed ID
8214390 View in PubMed
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Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1990 Jun;22(6 Pt 1):1019-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
D P Sheridan
P R Lane
J. Irvine
M J Martel
D J Hogan
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1990 Jun;22(6 Pt 1):1019-23
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Female
HLA Antigens - analysis
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Photosensitivity Disorders - genetics - immunology
Prurigo - genetics - immunology
Saskatchewan
Abstract
Thirty-two actinic prurigo patients of Cree ancestry underwent human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) typing and were compared with 32 control subjects of Cree ancestry. We found a significantly increased frequency of HLA-A24 and Cw4 antigens and a significant decrease in the frequency of the A3 antigen in actinic prurigo patients. These HLA associations may be helpful in determining whether actinic prurigo is a distinct disease or a variant of polymorphous light eruption.
PubMed ID
2370326 View in PubMed
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HLA typing in polymorphous light eruption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226581
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1991 Apr;24(4):570-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
P R Lane
D P Sheridan
D J Hogan
A. Moreland
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1991 Apr;24(4):570-3
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
HLA Antigens - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Photosensitivity Disorders - immunology - pathology
Prurigo - etiology - immunology - pathology
Saskatchewan
Abstract
Human leukocyte antigen typing of 41 white patients with polymorphous light eruption (limited concept) showed no significant differences when compared with the typing of 51 white control subjects. We previously found that actinic prurigo, an idiopathic photodermatosis particularly associated with Amerindians, has a positive association with antigens A24 and Cw4 and a negative association with A3. We suggest, on the basis of both laboratory and clinical findings, that polymorphous light eruption (limited concept) and actinic prurigo are two different and distinct diseases.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992 Apr;26(4):6581597562
Comment In: J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992 Apr;26(4):658-91597563
PubMed ID
2033133 View in PubMed
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Isotretinoin therapy for acne: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234277
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Jan 1;138(1):47-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-1988
Author
D J Hogan
L M Strand
P R Lane
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon.
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Jan 1;138(1):47-50
Date
Jan-1-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acne Vulgaris - drug therapy
Administration, Topical
Adolescent
Adult
Drug Evaluation
Female
Humans
Isotretinoin
Male
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Saskatchewan
Teratogens
Tretinoin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
The use of isotretinoin over a 2-year period was retrospectively studied in Saskatchewan. The database of the Saskatchewan Prescription Drug Plan was used to obtain the names of physicians who prescribed isotretinoin as well as the names of patients for whom it was prescribed. Of the 861 such patients 161 had been instructed to use the drug for at least 4 months by 42 physicians. Questionnaires were returned by 86 of the 161 patients and 22 of the 42 physicians. The responses confirmed that isotretinoin therapy is highly effective for acne. However, at least half of the patients for whom the agent was prescribed apparently did not complete a full 4- to 5-month course of treatment, and of the 34 women (average age 28 years) who responded to the questionnaire 12 (35%) did not use a method of contraception, which is a matter of concern in view of isotretinoin's teratogenic effects.
Notes
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PubMed ID
2961430 View in PubMed
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Linkage of familial schizophrenia to chromosome 13q32.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200845
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1999 Oct;65(4):1096-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
L M Brzustowicz
W G Honer
E W Chow
D. Little
J. Hogan
K. Hodgkinson
A S Bassett
Author Affiliation
Center for Molecular and Behavorial Neuroscience, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102, USA brzustowicz@axon.rutgers.edu
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1999 Oct;65(4):1096-103
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13 - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8 - genetics
Genes, Dominant
Genes, Recessive
Genetic Linkage - genetics
Genetic Markers - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Lod Score
Models, Genetic
Schizophrenia - genetics
Abstract
Over the past 4 years, a number of investigators have reported findings suggestive of linkage to schizophrenia, with markers on chromosomes 13q32 and 8p21, with one recent study by Blouin et al. reporting significant linkage to these regions. As part of an ongoing genome scan, we evaluated microsatellite markers spanning chromosomes 8 and 13, for linkage to schizophrenia, in 21 extended Canadian families. Families were analyzed under autosomal dominant and recessive models, with broad and narrow definitions of schizophrenia. All models produced positive LOD scores with markers on 13q, with higher scores under the recessive models. The maximum three-point LOD scores were obtained under the recessive-broad model: 3.92 at recombination fraction (theta).1 with D13S793, under homogeneity, and 4.42 with alpha=.65 and straight theta=0 with D13S793, under heterogeneity. Positive LOD scores were also obtained, under all models, for markers on 8p. Although a maximum two-point LOD score of 3.49 was obtained under the dominant-narrow model with D8S136 at straight theta=0.1, multipoint analysis with closely flanking markers reduced the maximum LOD score in this region to 2. 13. These results provide independent significant evidence of linkage of a schizophrenia-susceptibility locus to markers on 13q32 and support the presence of a second susceptibility locus on 8p21.
Notes
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PubMed ID
10486329 View in PubMed
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Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1989 Oct;21(4):249-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
P R Lane
V L Harms
D J Hogan
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1989 Oct;21(4):249-54
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Dermatitis, Contact - diagnosis
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Nickel - immunology
Patch Tests - methods
Plants - immunology
Pollen - immunology
Prurigo - diagnosis - ethnology
Resins, Plant - adverse effects
Saskatchewan
Sex Factors
Skin Tests - methods
Abstract
42 out of 93 Saskatchewan Indians (32 female (F) and 10 male (M] with actinic prurigo were patch tested to standard series allergens between 1983 and 1987. Positive reactions were most frequently seen with nickel (3F:2M) and colophony. All 3 positive patch tests to colophony were in males. The same patients were also patch tested to extracts of 21 Saskatchewan plants and 3 Hollister-Stier plant extracts. Only 1 male and 2 females had positive patch tests. None of these 3 had rashes on the eyelids, behind the ears or under the chin. We conclude that plant contact dermatitis is unlikely to be mistaken for actinic prurigo in Saskatchewan.
PubMed ID
2598651 View in PubMed
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Perioral dermatitis: an uncommon condition?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237122
Source
CMAJ. 1986 May 1;134(9):1025-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1986
Author
D J Hogan
J D Epstein
P R Lane
Source
CMAJ. 1986 May 1;134(9):1025-8
Date
May-1-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - adverse effects
Adult
Age Factors
Chronic Disease
Drug Eruptions - epidemiology - etiology
Erythema - chemically induced - epidemiology
Facial Dermatoses - chemically induced - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth
Risk
Rosacea - chemically induced - epidemiology
Saskatchewan
Sex Factors
Abstract
To document the persistence of perioral dermatitis at dermatology clinics at University Hospital, Saskatoon, we reviewed the charts of all patients with the condition seen between January 1983 and March 1985. Patients with rosacea referred to the clinics during the same period were used as a comparison group. A total of 80 patients with perioral dermatitis and 117 patients with rosacea were seen during the study period; most were female. Those with perioral dermatitis were significantly younger and had a significantly shorter mean duration of the eruption before presentation than those with rosacea (p less than 0.001). The distribution of the lesions was different in the two groups. Sixty-eight (85%) of the patients with perioral dermatitis and 45 (38%) of those with rosacea had used topical corticosteroids, a postulated risk factor for perioral dermatitis; the use of potent topical corticosteroids was frequent in both groups. Despite continuing medical education on the dangers of chronic use of these agents for eruptions on the face, physicians continue to prescribe them.
Notes
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PubMed ID
2938708 View in PubMed
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Results of routine patch testing of 542 patients in Saskatoon, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232716
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1988 Aug;19(2):120-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1988
Author
D J Hogan
M. Hill
P R Lane
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1988 Aug;19(2):120-4
Date
Aug-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Dermatitis, Contact - diagnosis
Ethylenediamines - immunology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Leg Dermatoses - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neomycin - immunology
Nickel - immunology
Patch Tests - methods
Saskatchewan
Sex Factors
Skin Tests - methods
Abstract
542 patients (330 women, 212 men) with suspected allergic contact dermatitis were patch tested to standard series allergens between January 1983 and June 1987. Positive reactions were most frequently seen with nickel (17.4%), ethylenediamine (8.7%), formaldehyde (7.4%), colophony (7.0%), potassium dichromate (6.1%) and neomycin (5.7%). Patients with dermatitis involving the legs were significantly more likely to be allergic to ethylenediamine (p = 0.01) and benzocaine (p = 0.04) than those with dermatitis not involving the legs. Neomycin allergy was not associated with dermatitis involving the legs. Patients allergic to ethylenediamine were significantly more likely to be allergic to neomycin than patients not allergic to ethylenediamine (p = 0.002).
PubMed ID
3180777 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.