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174 records – page 1 of 18.

[A chest-pain-unit. A complement to the department of myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54659
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 May 8;93(19):1835-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-1996
Author
J. Herlitz
B W Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Kardiologidivisionen, Sahlgrenska sjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 May 8;93(19):1835-6
Date
May-8-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - diagnosis
Cardiology Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Chest Pain - diagnosis
Coronary Care Units
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis
Sweden
United States
PubMed ID
8667815 View in PubMed
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Adrenaline in out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation. Does it make any difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11388
Source
Resuscitation. 1995 Jun;29(3):195-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
J. Herlitz
L. Ekström
B. Wennerblom
A. Axelsson
A. Bång
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 1995 Jun;29(3):195-201
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Emergencies
Emergency medical services
Epinephrine - therapeutic use
Female
Heart Arrest - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Fibrillation - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A large proportion of cardiac arrests outside hospital are caused by ventricular fibrillation. Although it is frequently used, the exact role of treatment with adrenaline in these patients remains to be determined. AIM: To describe the proportion of patients with witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest found in ventricular fibrillation who survived and were discharged from hospital in relation to whether they were treated with adrenaline prior to hospital admission. PATIENTS AND TREATMENT: All the patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest found in ventricular fibrillation in Göteborg between 1981 and 1992 in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated by our emergency medical service (EMS). During the observation period, some of the EMS staff were authorized to give medication and some were not. RESULTS: In all, 1360 patients were found in ventricular fibrillation and detailed information was available in 1203 cases (88%). Adrenaline was given in 417 cases (35%). Among patients with sustained ventricular fibrillation, those who received adrenaline experienced the return of spontaneous circulation more frequently (P
PubMed ID
7667549 View in PubMed
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Ambulance despatchers' estimation of intensity of pain and presence of associated symptoms in relation to outcome in patients who call for an ambulance because of acute chest pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54720
Source
Eur Heart J. 1995 Dec;16(12):1789-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
J. Herlitz
A. Bång
L. Isaksson
T. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1995 Dec;16(12):1789-94
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulances
Chest Pain - classification - etiology - mortality
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - mortality
Pain Measurement
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A large number of patients who call for an ambulance because of acute chest pain have an acute ischaemic event, but some do not. AIM. To relate the ambulance despatcher's estimated severity of pain and presence of associated symptoms, in patients who call for an ambulance because of acute chest pain, to whether they develop acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and to the risk of early death. PATIENTS: All those with acute chest pain who contacted the despatch centre in Göteborg over a 2-month period. RESULTS: In all, 503 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Patients judged as having severe chest pain (68%) developed AMI during the first 3 days in hospital on 26% of occasions as compared with 13% among patients judged as having only vague chest pain (P = 0.0004). The difference was less marked among the elderly and women. The presence of any of the following associated symptoms, dyspnoea, nausea, vertigo, cold sweat or syncope, tended to be associated with a higher infarction rate (24%) than if none of these symptoms was present (17%, P = 0.06). Mortality during the pre-hospital and the hospital phase was not associated with the estimated severity of pain or the presence of associated symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The despatcher's estimation of the severity of pain and the presence of associated symptoms appears to be associated with the development of AMI but not with early mortality.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1995 Dec;16(12):1747-88681995
PubMed ID
8682008 View in PubMed
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An alternative estimate of the disappearance rate of ventricular fibrillation in our-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53900
Source
Resuscitation. 2001 May;49(2):219-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001

Analysis of initial rhythm, witnessed status and delay to treatment among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140316
Source
Heart. 2010 Nov;96(22):1826-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
C. Holmgren
L. Bergfeldt
N. Edvardsson
T. Karlsson
J. Lindqvist
J. Silfverstolpe
L. Svensson
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Organisation, NÄL, SE-461 85 Trollhättan, Sweden. christina.holmgren@vgregion.se
Source
Heart. 2010 Nov;96(22):1826-30
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Brain - physiopathology
Electric Countershock
Electrocardiography
Emergency medical services
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - mortality - physiopathology - therapy
Registries
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The characteristics of patients who survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) are incompletely known. The characteristics of survivors of OHCA during a period of 16 years in Sweden are described.
All the patients included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry between 1992 and 2007 in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted and who were alive after 1 month were included in the survey.
In all, 2432 survivors were registered. Information on initial rhythm at their first ECG recording was missing in 11%. Of the remaining 2165 survivors, 80% had a shockable rhythm and 20% had a non-shockable rhythm. Only a minority with a shockable rhythm among the bystander-witnessed cases were defibrillated within 5 min after cardiac arrest. This proportion did not change during the entry period. Among survivors found in a non-shockable rhythm, the majority were bystander-witnessed cases and a few had a delay from cardiac arrest to ambulance arrival of
Notes
Comment In: Heart. 2010 Nov;96(22):1785-620965991
PubMed ID
20889992 View in PubMed
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The appropriateness of performing coronary angiography and coronary artery revascularization in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54902
Source
JAMA. 1994 Apr 27;271(16):1260-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-1994
Author
A. Bengtson
J. Herlitz
T. Karlsson
G. Brandrup-Wognsen
A. Hjalmarson
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Wallenberg Laboratory, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
JAMA. 1994 Apr 27;271(16):1260-5
Date
Apr-27-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - radiography - surgery
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Coronary Angiography - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Revascularization - statistics & numerical data - utilization
New York
Prospective Studies
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Regional Health Planning
Sweden
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Utilization Review
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the appropriateness of performing coronary angiography and revascularization in a Swedish population. DESIGN--Prospective population study of questionnaires and medical records. SETTING--All the hospitals in southwestern Sweden that perform coronary angiography and revascularization. PATIENTS--Random sample of 831 patients (with chronic stable angina) on the waiting list for coronary angiography or revascularization in southwestern Sweden in September 1990. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Percentage of patients referred for coronary angiography or revascularization for appropriate, uncertain, or inappropriate indications. RESULTS--Of the patients referred for angiography, 89% were classified as appropriate, 9% as uncertain, and 2% as inappropriate. The percentages are similar for patients referred for coronary artery bypass graft surgery and for angioplasty (91% and 86%, respectively, classified as appropriate). The majority of patients had chest pain rated as Canadian Cardiovascular Society classes II through IV (93%), despite maximum anti-ischemic therapy in 90% of these patients. CONCLUSIONS--Few patients were referred for coronary angiography or revascularization for inappropriate or uncertain indications. The percentage of these patients who are from southwestern Sweden is similar to the percentage recently reported from New York State.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 1994 Oct 26;272(16):1254-57933367
PubMed ID
8151901 View in PubMed
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Are predictors for myocardial infarction the same for women and men when evaluated prior to hospital admission?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45671
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2005 Jul 20;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-2005
Author
L. Svensson
R. Nordlander
C. Axelsson
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, South Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2005 Jul 20;
Date
Jul-20-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
AIM: To describe predictors of myocardial infarction prior to hospital admission in women and men among patients with a suspected acute coronary syndrome without ST-elevation. DESIGN: Prospective observational study in Stockholm and Göteborg, Sweden. RESULTS: Of 433 patients who did fulfill the inclusion criteria 45% were women. Fewer women (17%) than men (26%) developed acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (p=0.054), particularly among patients with initial ST-depression, in whom AMI was developed in 22% of women and 54% of men (p=0.001). Predictors for infarct development in women were: a history of AMI and advanced age. Among men they were: initial ST-depression or a Q-wave on ECG and elevation of biochemical markers (both recorded on admission of the ambulance crew). There was a significant interaction between gender and the influence of ST-depression on the risk for development of myocardial infarction (p
PubMed ID
16039735 View in PubMed
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Association between population density and reported incidence, characteristics and outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100991
Source
Resuscitation. 2011 May 14;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-14-2011
Author
A. Strömsöe
L. Svensson
A. Claesson
J. Lindkvist
A. Lundström
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Social Sciences, University of Dalarna, 791 88 Falun, Sweden; Institute of Internal Medicine, Department of Metabolism and Cardiovascular Research, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 413 45 Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 2011 May 14;
Date
May-14-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
AIM: To describe the reported incidence of out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and the characteristics and outcome after OHCA in relation to population density in Sweden. METHODS: All patients participating in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register between 2008 and 2009 in (a) 20 of 21 regions (n=6457) and in (b) 165 of 292 municipalities (n=3522) in Sweden, took part in the survey. RESULTS: The regional population density varied between 3 and 310 inhabitants per km(2) in 2009. In 2008-2009, the number of reported cardiac arrests varied between 13 and 52 per 100,000 inhabitants and year. Survival to 1month varied between 2% and 14% during the same period in different regions. With regard to population density, based on municipalities, bystander CPR (p=0.04) as well as cardiac etiology (p=0.002) were more frequent in less populated areas. Ambulance response time was longer in less populated areas (p
PubMed ID
21628082 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of trained Swedish lay rescuers toward CPR performance in an emergency. A survey of 1012 recently trained CPR rescuers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72217
Source
Resuscitation. 2000 Mar;44(1):27-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
A. Axelsson
A. Thorén
S. Holmberg
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Röda Srâket 4, SE-413 45, Göteborg, Sweden. asa.axelsson@alfa.telenordia.se
Source
Resuscitation. 2000 Mar;44(1):27-36
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Emergencies
Female
Health Education - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Professional Competence
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
59 years old. Only 1% had attended the course because of their own or a relative's cardiac disease. Ninety-four per cent believed there was a minor to major risk of serious disease transmission while performing CPR. When predicting their willingness to perform CPR in six scenarios, 17% would not start CPR on a young drug addict, 7% would not perform CPR on an unkempt man, while 97% were sure about starting CPR on a relative and 91% on a known person. In four of six scenarios, respondents from rural areas were significantly more positive than respondents from metropolitan areas about starting CPR. In conclusion, readiness to perform CPR on a known person is high among trained CPR rescuers, while hesitation about performing CPR on a stranger is evident. Respondents from rural areas are more frequently positive about starting CPR than those from metropolitan areas.
PubMed ID
10699697 View in PubMed
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174 records – page 1 of 18.