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39 records – page 1 of 4.

Analysis of prognostic factors in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Uro-Oncology Group of Northern Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24782
Source
J Urol. 1991 Aug;146(2):372-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
D S Ernst
J. Hanson
P M Venner
Author Affiliation
Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Urol. 1991 Aug;146(2):372-6
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - blood - mortality - therapy
Age Factors
Alberta
Bone Neoplasms - blood - mortality - secondary - therapy
Bone and Bones - radionuclide imaging
Combined Modality Therapy
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - blood - mortality - secondary - therapy
Male
Neoplasm Staging
Orchiectomy
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - mortality - therapy
Survival Analysis
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
We determined the influence of the extent of disease on bone scan, serum testosterone, patient age, performance status, method of initial diagnosis, Gleason grade, clinical stage at diagnosis, serum acid phosphatase, serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) and primary hormonal treatment on survival. The clinical and hormonal data were obtained when the presence of metastatic disease was established and treatment was to be initiated in 162 men with metastatic prostate cancer. Mean followup was 16 months (range 1 to 105 months). A total of 70 men (43.2%) died of the metastatic disease during the evaluation period. Log rank analysis revealed that only serum testosterone (p = 0.035) and extent of disease on bone scan (p = 0.003) significantly affected over-all survival. A trend (p = 0.068) towards decreased survival was observed with increasing values of PSA. Increasing values of acid phosphatase positively correlated with extent of disease on bone scan but was not a significant independent prognostic factor. Patient age, performance status, clinical stage, method of initial diagnosis, Gleason grade and type of hormonal treatment did not significantly influence survival. Upon using multivariate Cox analysis, only extent of disease on bone scan was significantly correlated with over-all survival (p less than 0.014). PSA may also be influential but longer duration of followup will be necessary. We conclude that extent of disease on bone scan is the most important prognosticator of the analyzed factors and that serum testosterone may be of value.
PubMed ID
1856934 View in PubMed
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Analysis of "time to second primary" in patients with gynecological cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239442
Source
J Chronic Dis. 1985;38(5):443-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
M. Koch
J. Hanson
G B Hill
A A Starreveld
H. Gaedke
Source
J Chronic Dis. 1985;38(5):443-7
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Ovarian Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Registries
Time Factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Uterine Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Abstract
Lifetable survival curves have been adapted to measure "time to second primary" and used to compare incidence of second primary in all patients in the Alberta Cancer Registry with a primary malignancy in cervix, endometrium and ovary. Comparisons were also obtained within each diagnostic category between patients treated or not treated with radiation. Results show that there are no statistically significant differences in the 25 years following diagnosis of the first primary in "time to second primaries" in patients with cancer of the cervix, endometrium or ovary. Similarly, within each diagnostic category, there are no differences between radiation treated patients and those not treated by radiation, when adjustments for age differences are made and when patients are selected by length of survival.
PubMed ID
3998059 View in PubMed
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Bilateral breast cancer in northern Alberta: risk factors and survival patterns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26791
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Apr 1;130(7):881-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1984
Author
P E Burns
K. Dabbs
C. May
A W Lees
L R Birkett
H J Jenkins
J. Hanson
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Apr 1;130(7):881-6
Date
Apr-1-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Carcinoma in Situ - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mammography
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Multiple Primary - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Palpation
Physical Examination
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Time Factors
Abstract
Of 2231 women with stage I, II or III breast cancer who were registered and seen between 1971 and 1979 and followed to the end of 1981, 48 (2.2%) had synchronous and 58 (2.6%) asynchronous bilateral breast cancer. The unadjusted incidence rate for a second breast cancer was 6.4/1000 breast-years at risk, compared with a rate of 0.70 for the risk of a first breast cancer in women. When calculated from the date of diagnosis of the first breast cancer the survival rate was better for the group with asynchronous disease than for the group with synchronous disease or for a group with unilateral disease, but when calculated from the date of diagnosis of the second cancer the rate was the same in all three groups. Comparison of known risk factors showed a significant association between the development of bilateral cancer and a later age at the birth of the first child and a longer interval between menarche and that birth. There was a trend towards greater age and more stage III cancer in the group with synchronous disease. There was no correlation between receiving radiotherapy for the first breast cancer and development of the second cancer. Annual mammography and clinical examination of asymptomatic women at a cancer centre resulted in the detection of a significantly higher proportion of minimal breast cancers in the second breast compared with the first. Such screening practices should be even more valuable in the earlier detection of unilateral breast cancer in asymptomatic women who have not had breast cancer.
PubMed ID
6322952 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer in northern Alberta: pilot study in computerized registration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27705
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 May 21;116(10):1131-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-21-1977
Author
P E Burns
J. Kredentser
M. Grace
J. Hanson
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 May 21;116(10):1131-5
Date
May-21-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Computers
Female
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Mastectomy
Menarche
Menopause
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Registries
Abstract
Analysis of data from 643 breast cancer patients seen between 1971 and 1973 in northern Alberta was undertaken as a preliminary study leading towards a comprehensive breast registry. Age at first treatment and menopausal status were found to be related significantly to the clinical stage of the disease. Other data reported included age at menarche, lymph node involvement and methods of primary treatment. A decline in use of the radical mastectomy was noted. The comprehensive breast registry, which will be used to identify high-risk groups, assess treatment modalities, test hypotheses and generate ideas, has a high probability of success because of compulsory registration of new cases of breast cancer in Alberta and collection of data by the same four individuals.
PubMed ID
861863 View in PubMed
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Cadmium and prostatic cancer in Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244820
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Jan 15;124(2):121
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1981
Author
G. Bako
E S Smith
J. Hanson
R. Dewar
G B Hill
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Jan 15;124(2):121
Date
Jan-15-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Cadmium Poisoning - complications
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Notes
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1961 Aug;14:236-5813748669
PubMed ID
7459774 View in PubMed
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Cancer of the bladder in Alberta: a urologic audit review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247090
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Jun 23;120(12):1511-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-23-1979
Author
G. Hnatko
J. Hanson
M. Grace
M S McPhee
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Jun 23;120(12):1511-4
Date
Jun-23-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Canada
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Carcinoma, Transitional Cell - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Abstract
A review was conducted of 660 cases of cancer of the bladder diagnosed in two periods, 1960--62 and 1968--70. A significant increase in the incidence of bladder cancer in both sexes, paralleling the trends in other parts of North America, was found. During the second period the disease was diagnosed earlier and, once diagnosed, was apparently treated more successfully. Overall 5-year survival rates increased from 57% to 70% for patients with stage O or A disease, but were relatively constant, at about 36%, for patients with stage B1 or B2 disease. The survival rate for patients with stage O or A disease appeared to improve without clearly defined changes in treatment. Prospective randomized treatment trials are needed to properly assess the value of definitive and adjunctive methods of treatment.
Notes
Cites: J Urol. 1964 Dec;92:668-7814241196
Cites: J Urol. 1977 Aug;118(2):260-1894803
Cites: J Urol. 1977 Jul;118(1 Pt 2):179-83875216
Cites: J Urol. 1976 Nov;116(5):570-4978808
Cites: Urology. 1976 Sep;8(3):247-50969076
Cites: J Urol. 1975 Jun;113(6):806-10807747
Cites: Cancer. 1973 Nov;32(5):1075-74757903
Cites: J Urol. 1975 Sep;114(3):391-31142521
Cites: J Urol. 1975 Feb;113(2):186-91113413
PubMed ID
455207 View in PubMed
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Carcinoma of the tonsil: prognostic factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21925
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1997 Oct;26(5):296-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
S. al-Abdulwahed
W. Kudryk
N. al-Rajhi
J. Hanson
H. Jenkins
H. Gaedke
N. Jha
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1997 Oct;26(5):296-9
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - mortality - pathology - therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Survival Rate
Tonsillar Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - therapy
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to provide a review of the prognostic factors of tonsillar carcinoma. DESIGN: A retrospective analysis. SETTING/PATIENTS: Patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil, treated in Northern Alberta, at the Cross Cancer Institute from 1975 to 1995 were analyzed using a population-based, head and neck cancer registry. There were 102 patients, 73 male and 29 female, ranging in age from 35 years to 83 years, with a mean of 60 years. The clinical stages were T1: 5 patients; T2: 27 patients, T3: 33 patients; T4: 11 patients; and Tx: 3 patients. The nodal stages were N0: 33 patients, N1: 26 patients; N2: 34 patients, N3: 7 patients; Nx: 2 patients. METHOD: The patients were treated with various modalities: surgery alone: 2 patients; surgery plus radiation: 26 patients; radiation treatment alone: 61 patients; and others: 13 patients. Patients were classified according to the UICC TNM 1992 criteria. The overall 5-year Kaplan-Meier survival in our series was 39%. The cause-specific 4-year survival was 57%. Various prognostic factors and their impact on survival were studied. RESULTS: On univariate analysis, the following factors were found to be significant. Age 50 (p = .02); endophytic growth pattern vs. exophytic growth of the primary (p = .01); ulcerated lesions vs. nonulcerated lesions (p = .000); various T stages (p = .003); clinical extension vs. no extension of primary disease (p = .02); combined modality of treatment (surgery and radiation treatment) had the best chance of survival compared to radiation treatment alone (p = .03). Nodal stages N0 vs. N+ disease (p = .2); sex of the patient, female vs. male (p = .83); and dose of radiation treatment 5000 cGy (p = .41) were found not to be significant. When the above significant factors were stratified according to the stage of the disease, only two were significant; ulcerated lesions vs. nonulcerated lesions (p = .04), and the modality of treatment chosen (e.g., radiation alone vs. radiation plus surgery) (p = .02). CONCLUSIONS: In this series of patients, combined-modity approach using surgery and radiation treatment was found to be the best way to treat carcinoma of the tonsil. However, each treatment strategy should be individualized taking into account various prognostic factors.
PubMed ID
9343766 View in PubMed
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Cognitive failure in patients with terminal cancer: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223895
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 1992 May;7(4):192-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
E. Bruera
L. Miller
J. McCallion
K. Macmillan
L. Krefting
J. Hanson
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 1992 May;7(4):192-5
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hospitals, General
Humans
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Terminal Care
Abstract
In a prospective open study, 61 consecutive patients with terminal cancer admitted to the hospital underwent cognitive assessment using the Mini-Mental State Questionnaire three times a week between admission and discharge or death. Mini-Mental State Questionnaire score upon admission was 28 +/- 1.5 in patients who were discharged (N = 14), and 25 +/- 3 in patients who died in the hospital (N = 47, P less than 0.01). The forty-seven patients who died in the hospital presented a total of 66 episodes of cognitive failure (CF) that were defined as a score of less than 24 or a drop of greater than 30% in the score on the Mini-Mental State Questionnaire. Of these 47 patients, 39 (83%) presented CF an average of 16 days before death. Upon detection of CF, a complete medical examination, laboratory evaluation, computerized tomography of the brain if indicated by abnormal findings on medical examination, and a complete medication review were performed. The cause of CF could not be established in 37 (56%) cases. Drugs, sepsis, and brain metastasis were the most frequently detected causes and were present in 6, 4, and 4 cases, respectively. In addition, 22 episodes (33%) of CF improved (10 episodes spontaneously and 12 episodes as a result of treatment). Our findings suggest that CF is extremely prevalent during the last weeks of life and, consequently, informed consent for therapeutic or research procedures or resuscitation may be impossible to obtain reliably at that stage.
PubMed ID
1517640 View in PubMed
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Correlation between c-erbB-2 amplification and risk of recurrent disease in node-negative breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24914
Source
Cancer Res. 1991 Jan 15;51(2):556-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1991
Author
M C Paterson
K D Dietrich
J. Danyluk
A H Paterson
A W Lees
N. Jamil
J. Hanson
H. Jenkins
B E Krause
W A McBlain
Author Affiliation
Breast Unit, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Cancer Res. 1991 Jan 15;51(2):556-67
Date
Jan-15-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - genetics - pathology
Case-Control Studies
DNA, Neoplasm - isolation & purification
Female
Gene Amplification
Humans
Immunoblotting
Lymphatic Metastasis
Menopause
Middle Aged
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Prognosis
Proto-Oncogene Proteins - analysis - genetics
Proto-Oncogenes
Receptor, erbB-2
Receptors, Estrogen - analysis
Recurrence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Abstract
Drawing upon the comprehensive population-based Northern Alberta Breast Cancer Registry containing 704 patients with histologically negative axillary lymph nodes who have been followed for 5-16 years, we have undertaken a retrospective case-control study to evaluate the utility of genomic amplification of specific protooncogenes [c-erbB-2 (nee HER-2/neu), c-erbA, c-myc, int-2, and hst-1] as predictive indicators of clinical outcome in node-negative disease. To this end, 115 women with node-negative breast cancer who had recurred at any time up to 16 years posttreatment (cases) were matched pairwise for appropriate clinicopathological variables (size of primary tumor, menopausal state, estrogen receptor status, anniversary year of treatment, and patient age) with a second group of 115 women (controls) selected from a cohort of 502 node-negative patients who had not relapsed during long-term follow-up. Tumor DNA extracted from archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were analyzed for protooncogene copy number by slot-blot hybridization. Taking a gene copy number of 3 as the cutoff, 27 of the 230 tumor samples examined contained from 3- to 22-fold elevation in c-erbB-2 genomic equivalents. Twenty-one of the 27 tumors amplified for c-erbB-2 were derived from cases and 6 from controls, signifying that 18% of the node-negative patients who had relapsed harbored excessive copies of the protooncogene in their malignant tissue compared to only 5% for the patients who had remained in remission. Accordingly, the occurrence of amplification of c-erbB-2 proved to be a statistically significant predictor of poor prognosis, especially disease-free interval (P = 0.006). Moreover, this genetic alteration appeared to be independent of and to have greater predictive power than most commonly used prognostic factors. Our findings also indicated that as a clinical test, measurement of c-erbB-2 amplification suffers from low sensitivity; however, when greater than 6 gene copies are present, the test has a positive predictive value for recurrence of 70%. Concurrent analysis of tumor DNA blots with probes for the other four protooncogenes examined revealed that their amplification, which others have reported to arise often, especially in node-positive disease, was seldom found even in our high-risk case group (2-3%). In short, our data strongly suggest that amplification of c-erbB-2 may contribute to the pathogenesis of some forms of node-negative breast cancer and thus may serve as a useful genetic marker to identify a subset of high-risk patients.
PubMed ID
1670762 View in PubMed
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39 records – page 1 of 4.