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Addressing the public health burden caused by the nutrition transition through the Healthy Foods North nutrition and lifestyle intervention programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99759
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:120-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
S. Sharma
J. Gittelsohn
R. Rosol
L. Beck
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. sangitag@ualberta.ca
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:120-7
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Dietary inadequacies, low levels of physical activity, excessive energy intake and high obesity prevalence have placed Inuit and Inuvialuit populations of the Canadian Arctic at increased risk of chronic disease. An evidence-based, community participatory process was used to develop Healthy Foods North (HFN), a culturally appropriate nutrition and physical activity intervention programme that aimed to reduce risk of chronic disease and improve dietary adequacy amongst Inuit/Inuvialuit in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. HFN was implemented over the course of 12 months in a series of seven phases between October 2008 and 2009 (Nunavut) and June 2008 and 2009 (Northwest Territories). Combining behaviour change and environmental strategies to increase both the availability of healthful food choices in local shops and opportunities for increasing physical activity, HFN promoted the consumption of traditional foods and nutrient-dense and/or low energy shop-bought foods, utilisation of preparation methods that do not add fat content, decreased consumption of high-energy shop-bought foods, and increased physical activity. Messages identified in the community workshops, such as the importance of family eating and sharing, were emphasised throughout the intervention. Intervention components were conducted by community staff and included working with shops to increase the stocking of healthy foods, point of purchase signage and promotion in shops and community settings, pedometer challenges in the workplace and use of community media (e.g. radio and cable television advertisements) to reinforce key messages. HFN represents an innovative multilevel approach to the reduction of chronic disease risk factors amongst Inuit and Inuvialuit, based on strong collaboration with local agencies, government and institutions.
PubMed ID
21158971 View in PubMed
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Awareness of chronic disease diagnosis amongst family members is associated with healthy dietary knowledge but not behaviour amongst Inuit in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138230
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:100-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
M. Pakseresht
E. Mead
J. Gittelsohn
C. Roache
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC, USA.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:100-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Eating - ethnology
Energy Intake - ethnology
Family
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Heart Diseases - ethnology
Humans
Hypertension - ethnology
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Nunavut - epidemiology
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The extent to which awareness of chronic disease (CD) diagnosis affects one's healthy food knowledge, self-efficacy and intentions or healthy dietary and physical activity (PA) behaviours remains unexplored among Inuit in Canada.
A food frequency questionnaire and an adult impact questionnaire were used in a cross-sectional study to collect self-reported data on daily energy and nutrient intake, PA and the diagnosis of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease and cancer amongst adult Inuit and their family members. Associations between awareness of personal and family CD status and healthy food knowledge, self-efficacy and intentions, percentage of energy consumed from non-nutrient-dense foods and PA were assessed via ordinal logistic regression.
Of the 266 participants, those who self-reported CD for both themselves and their relative(s) were more likely to have high healthy food knowledge [odds ratio (OR)=2.45] than those who did not. Reporting hypertension and heart disease amongst only relatives increased the likelihood of high knowledge (OR=5.20) and intentions (OR=5.10) for healthy eating. Heart disease in both participants and their relatives was associated with high levels of PA (OR=12.24). However, there were no associations when only participants (but not their relatives) reported having CD. A joint effect between a high level of education and awareness of CD was positively related to high food knowledge (OR=38.93). An inverse association between awareness of CD and unhealthy eating was not observed.
Awareness of a relative having a CD was a more important factor in increasing knowledge and, to a lesser degree, self-efficacy or intentions to eat healthy than participants' awareness of personal CD. However, awareness was not associated with lower non-nutrient-dense food intake.
PubMed ID
21158968 View in PubMed
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Body image concepts differ by age and sex in an Ojibway-Cree community in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210462
Source
J Nutr. 1996 Dec;126(12):2990-3000
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
J. Gittelsohn
S B Harris
A L Thorne-Lyman
A J Hanley
A. Barnie
B. Zinman
Author Affiliation
Department of International Health, School of Hygiene and Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205-2179, USA.
Source
J Nutr. 1996 Dec;126(12):2990-3000
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Body Image
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Ontario
Sex Factors
Abstract
Community-based studies of body image concepts can be useful for developing health interventions to prevent obesity-related diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease in specific populations. First Nations peoples, in particular, face increased obesity-related health problems as a result of acculturative changes in diet and activity. This study examined body shape perception in an Ojibway-Cree community in Northern Ontario, Canada. A set of figure outline drawings ranging from very thin to very obese were used to examine perceived body shape, body shape satisfaction and ideals of healthiness across sex and age groups. Overall, only 16% of the population were satisfied with their current body shape. People with a higher body mass index (BMI) were less satisfied with their bodies and thought they were less healthy than people with a lower BMI. While females had a significantly greater BMI than males, males and females did not differ significantly in perception of current body shape. On the other hand, females desired relatively smaller body shapes than males (P
PubMed ID
9001366 View in PubMed
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Development of an integrated diabetes prevention program with First Nations in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171217
Source
Health Promot Int. 2006 Jun;21(2):88-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
L S Ho
J. Gittelsohn
S B Harris
E. Ford
Author Affiliation
Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. lho@jhsph.edu
Source
Health Promot Int. 2006 Jun;21(2):88-97
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
Diabetes Mellitus - prevention & control
Diet
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Indians, North American
Ontario
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Program Development
Research Design
Risk factors
Rural Health
School Health Services
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among First Nations in Canada. We used multiple research methods to develop an integrated multi-institutional diabetes prevention program based on the successful Sandy Lake Health and Diabetes Project and Apache Healthy Stores programs. In-depth interviews, a structured survey, demonstration and feedback sessions, group activities, and meetings with key stakeholders were used to generate knowledge about the needs and resources for each community, and to obtain feedback on SLHDP interventions. First Nations communities were eager to address the increasing epidemic of diabetes. Educating children through a school prevention program was the most popular proposed intervention. Remote communities had poorer access to healthy foods and more on-reserve media and services than the smaller semi-remote reserves. While the reserves shared similar risk factors for diabetes, variations in health beliefs and attitudes and environmental conditions required tailoring of programs to each reserve. In addition, it was necessary to balance community input with proven health promotion strategies. This study demonstrates the importance of formative research in developing integrated health promotion programs for multiple communities based on previously evaluated studies.
PubMed ID
16407394 View in PubMed
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Food sources and dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium among Inuvialuit in the NWT: results from Healthy Foods North

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286386
Source
Page 335 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
FOOD SOURCES AND DIETARY INTAKE OF VITAMIN D AND CALCIUM AMONG INUVIALUIT IN THE NWT, RESULTS FROM HEAL THY FOODS NORTH E. De Roose, X. Cao, A. Dennison, J. Gittelsohn, 5. Sharma Government of the Northwest Territories, Department of Health and Social Services, Yellowknife, NT Objective
  1 document  
Author
E. De Roose
X. Cao
A. Dennison
J. Gittelsohn
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Government of the Northwest Territories, Department of Health and Social Services, Yellowknife, NT
Source
Page 335 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Fruit and vegetable consumption among Inuvialuit of the Northwest Territories: results from Healthy Foods North

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286385
Source
Page 334 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION AMONG INUVIALUIT OF THE NORTHWEST TERRITORIES, RESULTS FROM HEAL THY FOODS NORTH L. Beck, E. De Roose, 5. Biggs, 5. Reaburn, E. Erber, J. Gittelsohn, 5. Sharma The Canadian Public Health Association, lnuvik, NT Objective: To determine mean daily intake
  1 document  
Author
L. Beck
E. De Roose
S. Biggs
S. Reaburn
E. Erber
J. Gittelsohn
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
The Canadian Public Health Association, Inuvik, NT
Source
Page 334 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
Less detail

Healthy food intentions and higher socioeconomic status are associated with healthier food choices in an Inuit population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138232
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:83-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
E. Mead
J. Gittelsohn
C. Roache
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC, USA.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:83-91
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Female
Food Habits - ethnology - psychology
Food Preferences - ethnology - psychology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Intervention Studies
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Nunavut
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Changing food behaviours amongst Canadian Inuit may contribute to rising chronic disease prevalence, and research is needed to develop nutritional behaviour change programmes. The present study examined patterns of food acquisition and preparation behaviours amongst Inuit adults in Nunavut and associations with psychosocial and socioeconomic factors.
Developed from behavioural theories and community workshops, Adult Impact Questionnaires were conducted with adult Inuit (=19 years) from randomly selected households in three remote communities in Nunavut, Canada, to determine patterns of healthy food knowledge, self-efficacy and intentions, frequencies of healthy and unhealthy food acquisition and healthiness of preparation methods. Associations between these constructs with demographic and socioeconomic factors were analysed using multivariate linear regressions.
Amongst 266 participants [mean (SD) age 41.2 (13.6) years; response rates 69-93%], non-nutrient-dense foods were acquired a mean (SD) of 2.9 (2.3) times more frequently than nutrient-dense, and/or low sugar/fat foods. Participants tended to use preparation methods that add fat. Intentions to perform healthy dietary behaviours was inversely correlated with unhealthy food acquisition (ß=-0.25, P
PubMed ID
21158966 View in PubMed
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Healthy Foods North improves diet among Inuit and Inuvialuit women of childbearing age in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259194
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2014 Apr;27 Suppl 2:175-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
A. Bains
M. Pakseresht
C. Roache
L. Beck
T. Sheehy
J. Gittelsohn
A. Corriveau
S. Sharma
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2014 Apr;27 Suppl 2:175-85
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Health Food
Humans
Intervention Studies
Inuits
Life Style
Northwest Territories
Nunavut
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Healthy Foods North (HFN) is a community-based intervention designed to promote a healthy diet and lifestyle of Inuit and Inuvialuit populations in Arctic Canada. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of HFN on the nutrient intake of women of childbearing age.
Six communities in Nunavut (n = 3) and the Northwest Territories (n = 3) were selected for programme implementation; four received a 12-month intervention and two served as controls. Quantitative food frequency questionnaires were used to assess dietary intake at baseline and 1 year post-intervention. Among women participants aged 19-44 years (n = 136), 79 were exposed to the intervention and 57 were not. Mean daily energy and nutrient intake and density were determined. Dietary adequacy was assessed by comparing the women's daily nutrient intakes with dietary reference intakes (DRI).
Main outcomes were the pre- to post-intervention changes between intervention and control groups for energy and selected nutrient intakes, nutrient density and dietary adequacy. Among the participants, the intervention had a beneficial effect on vitamin A and D intake. The percentage of individuals with nutrient intakes below the DRI increased from pre- to post-intervention for vitamin A and D in the control group but only for vitamin A in the intervention group. The programme did not have a significant impact on calorie, sugar, or fat consumption.
The HFN programme is effective in mitigating some of the negative impacts of the nutrition transition on dietary adequacy among Inuit and Inuvialuit women of childbearing age.
PubMed ID
23808787 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of the changing food environment on dietary practices of an Inuit population in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138240
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:18-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
E. Mead
J. Gittelsohn
M. Kratzmann
C. Roache
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC, USA.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:18-26
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Diet - ethnology
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits - ethnology
Life Style
Male
Nunavut - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Abstract
Nutritional inadequacies and increasing chronic disease prevalence amongst Inuit in the Canadian Arctic highlight the need to address dietary practices. Research is needed to investigate the individual and environmental factors impacting diet to guide interventions. The present study aimed to explore multiple community perspectives of key factors affecting food choice and availability in Inuit communities in Nunavut, Canada.
Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with Inuit adults (n=43) in two communities in Nunavut, Canada, and included community members, community leaders, elders, health staff and food shop staff. The interviewer transcribed the audio-taped interviews. Data were analysed using codes and the constant comparative method to determine categories and emergent themes.
Thirty-three Inuit (27 females and six males) and 10 non-Inuit (four females and six males) adults participated. Traditional foods procured through hunting and gathering were considered the healthiest by community members, although multiple factors inhibited their procurement, including high petrol cost and decrease in traditional knowledge about hunting and gathering practices. Cost and quality were the main barriers to purchasing healthy foods at the shops. Community leaders and health staff identified multiple barriers to healthy eating in the community, such as skills to prepare some shop-bought foods. Shop managers identified several challenges to providing fresh produce and other perishable foods, such as long transportation routes that increase costs and harsh climatic conditions that may cause spoilage. They also cited factors influencing their decisions regarding whether to stock/discontinue certain foods, such as customers' requests, food cost and shelf-life.
An intervention to reduce chronic disease risk and improve dietary adequacy amongst Nunavut Inuit may be effective by supporting individual behaviour modifications with food environment changes.
PubMed ID
21158958 View in PubMed
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Implementing a nutrition intervention program among the Inuit in Nunavut: store-centered activities of Healthy Foods North

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286397
Source
Page 344 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
IMPLEMENTING A NUTRITION INTERVENTION PROGRAM AMONG THE INUIT IN NUNAVUT, STORE-CENTERED ACTIVITIES OF HEAL THY FOODS NORTH M. Ugyuk, R. Rosol, A.J. Brunetti, E. Mead, C. Roache, R. Reid, J. Gittelsohn, 5. Sharma The Hamlet ofTaloyoak, Taloyoak, NU Objective: To describe how Healthy Foods
  1 document  
Author
M. Ugyuk
R. Rosol
A.J. Brunetti
E. Mead
C. Roache
R. Reid
J. Gittelsohn
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
The Hamlet of Taloyoak, Taloyoak, NU
Source
Page 344 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
Less detail

20 records – page 1 of 2.