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Home care for native American cancer patients: an oncologist's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4074
Source
Alaska Med. 1995 Oct-Dec;37(4):132, 156
Publication Type
Article
Author
J S Kaur
Source
Alaska Med. 1995 Oct-Dec;37(4):132, 156
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Forecasting
Home Care Services - trends
Humans
Indians, North American
Medical Oncology - trends
PubMed ID
8742156 View in PubMed
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Low national breast and cervical cancer-screening rates in American Indian and Alaska Native women with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3160
Source
J Am Board Fam Pract. 2000 Jul-Aug;13(4):239-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Giroux
T K Welty
F K Oliver
J S Kaur
G. Leonardson
N. Cobb
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Program, Aberdeen Indian Health Service Area, Rapid City, SD, USA.
Source
J Am Board Fam Pract. 2000 Jul-Aug;13(4):239-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Mammography - utilization
Mass Screening - utilization
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
United States - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears - utilization
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The cervical cancer mortality rate for American Indian and Alaska Native women is twice that of all races in the United States. To date the only published national breast and cervical cancer-screening rates for American Indian and Alaska Native women are based on self-reported data. When the Indian Health Service (IHS) conducts an annual audit on patients with diabetes, it includes cancer screening. This observational study presents national breast and cervical cancer-screening rates for American Indian and Alaska Native women with diabetes. METHODS: Cancer-screening rates were extracted from the 1995 diabetic audit for the 12 IHS areas. These rates were compared with rates for women without diabetes of the same age, 50 to 69 years, by chart review, at four IHS hospitals in the Aberdeen IHS area. RESULTS: Screening rates for women with diabetes in the 12 areas varied: mammogram (ever) 35% to 78%; clinical breast examination (last year) 28% to 70%, and Papanicolaou smear (last year) 26% to 69%. The Aberdeen IHS area women with diabetes had 51% more clinic visits per year than women without diabetes, but the groups had similar screening rates. CONCLUSION: Cancer-screening rates for American Indian and Alaska Native women vary by region. In the Aberdeen IHS area, women with diabetes had more visits (missed opportunities) but similar screening rates as women without diabetes. The diabetic audit could be used to monitor national IHS cancer-screening trends for women with diabetes and in the Aberdeen IHS area for all women aged 50 to 69 years.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Board Fam Pract. 2000 Nov-Dec;13(6):468-911117349
PubMed ID
10933287 View in PubMed
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Migration patterns and breast carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3985
Source
Cancer. 2000 Mar 1;88(5 Suppl):1203-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2000
Author
J S Kaur
Author Affiliation
Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.
Source
Cancer. 2000 Mar 1;88(5 Suppl):1203-6
Date
Mar-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology
Carcinoma - ethnology
Continental Population Groups
Emigration and Immigration
Environment
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Life Style
United States
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Many American Indian and Alaska Native women have lower incidence rates of breast carcinoma than other racial/ethnic groups in the United States. The rates in most areas, however, have increased in recent years. The author reviews the migration patterns and effects that might contribute to this change. METHODS: A review of the literature on migration and breast carcinoma incidence was conducted. RESULTS: Migration significantly impacts on breast carcinoma incidence in all groups of women studied. CONCLUSIONS: Research must be designed that will explore the components of host, life-styles, and environment on breast carcinoma rates in American Indian and Alaska Native women to elucidate mechanisms of breast carcinoma etiology.
PubMed ID
10705355 View in PubMed
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Source
Health Care Women Int. 1999 Sep-Oct;20(5):445-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
J S Kaur
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1999 Sep-Oct;20(5):445-53
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mass Screening - methods
Needs Assessment
Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Quality of Life
United States - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
Literature regarding cancer patterns in American Indians and Alaska Native women is reviewed and attention is paid to promising research initiatives to improve cancer prevention and control as well as approaches to enhance exchange of knowledge through a new national resource center. Lung, breast, and colorectal cancer are the leading cause of cancer deaths in American Indians and Alaska Native women. There continues to be a disproportionate death rate from cervical cancer. Enhanced availability for breast and cervical cancer screening in conjunction with community education is showing promising trends toward reversing the patterns of late diagnosis. Communities can benefit from sharing their collective resources in a new national resource center called "Native C.I.R.C.L.E." housed in the Mayo Cancer Center.
PubMed ID
10776114 View in PubMed
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The potential impact of cancer survivors on Native American cancer prevention and treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4034
Source
Cancer. 1996 Oct 1;78(7 Suppl):1578-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1996
Author
J S Kaur
Author Affiliation
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
Source
Cancer. 1996 Oct 1;78(7 Suppl):1578-81
Date
Oct-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude to Health
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Neoplasms - ethnology - mortality - psychology - therapy
Survival Rate
Survivors - psychology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Cancer has recently become a major health problem for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data showed that Native American survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years from cancer diagnosis are the poorest of any minority population studied. The causes for this finding are multifactorial and include a lack of awareness of cancer risks and symptoms, fatalism, and lack of access to screening services. Cancer survivors in native communities can be invaluable resources to educate others, raise cancer awareness, and most importantly prove that cancer is not always fatal.
PubMed ID
8839574 View in PubMed
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