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Seasonal affective disorder in an Arctic community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3312
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2002 May;105(5):378-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
J M Haggarty
Z. Cernovsky
M. Husni
K. Minor
P. Kermeen
H. Merskey
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. jhaggart@uwo.ca
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2002 May;105(5):378-84
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Seasonal Affective Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the rate of seasonal-pattern depression in an Inuit community above 70 degrees N. METHOD: One-hundred and eleven people from randomly selected households were surveyed for depression and anxiety and the effect of the seasons on their mood. Eighty-eight people provided replies on the influence of the seasons. RESULTS: One in five (22.6%) of the community sample was found to be depressed. Of these, seven (6.3%) had seasonal affective disorder (SAD), with fall onset occurring in six of these (5.4%). Subsyndromal SAD (SSAD) occurred in 11.7%, while any effect of the seasons (seasonality) occurred in 39.6%. Persons with SSAD and seasonality were significantly older than those unaffected by the seasonal effect. No other significant correlation of SAD, SSAD, or seasonality occurred with gender, age, and language preference. CONCLUSION: Seasonal mood changes in this Inuit group living in the Canadian Arctic are elevated above the rates found in other studies using similar survey methods.
PubMed ID
11942945 View in PubMed
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