Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Complementary and alternative medicine use in patients before and after a cancer diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294378
Source
Curr Oncol. 2018 Aug; 25(4):e275-e281
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
C A Buckner
R M Lafrenie
J A Dénommée
J M Caswell
D A Want
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences North Research Institute.
Source
Curr Oncol. 2018 Aug; 25(4):e275-e281
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Cancer patients are increasingly seeking out complementary and alternative medicine (cam) and might be reluctant to disclose its use to their oncology treatment team. Often, cam agents are not well studied, and little is known about their potential interactions with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or biologic therapies, and their correlations with outcomes. In the present study, we set out to determine the rate of cam use in patients receiving treatment at a Northern Ontario cancer centre.
Patients reporting for treatment at the Northeast Cancer Centre (necc) in Sudbury, Ontario, were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire to assess cam use. Changes in cam use before, compared with after, diagnosis were also assessed.
Patients in Northern Ontario reported significant cam use both before and after diagnosis. However, as a function of the cam type, cam use was greatly enhanced after cancer diagnosis. For example, the number of patients who reported use of biologic products increased to 51.8% after a cancer diagnosis from 15.6% before a cancer diagnosis. Patients reported much smaller changes in the use of alternative medical systems or spiritual therapy after diagnosis. Vitamin use was reported by 66% of respondents, and the number of different cams used correlated significantly with the reported number of vitamins used.
Use of cam, particularly biologic products, increased significantly after a cancer diagnosis. Further studies are required to examine the effect of cam use on the efficacy and safety of cancer therapies.
Notes
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2015 Mar 1;136(5):E359-86 PMID 25220842
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2016 Apr;24(4):1803-11 PMID 26446700
Cites: J Complement Integr Med. 2016 Jun 1;13(2):201-6 PMID 27089418
Cites: Altern Ther Health Med. 2002 Mar-Apr;8(2):54-6, 58-60, 62-4 PMID 11890386
Cites: Mol Cell Pharmacol. 2009;1(1):29-43 PMID 20333321
Cites: Rev Esc Enferm USP. 2014 Aug;48(4):683-9 PMID 25338250
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Nov 3;11(11):e0165801 PMID 27812163
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2017 Jan;71:70-79 PMID 27984769
Cites: JAMA. 1998 May 20;279(19):1548-53 PMID 9605899
Cites: Breast. 2017 Jun;33:132-138 PMID 28384564
Cites: J BUON. 2017 Mar-Apr;22(2):530-534 PMID 28534381
Cites: Nutrients. 2016 Dec 14;8(12): PMID 27983622
Cites: Clin Pharmacokinet. 2014 Jan;53(1):103-10 PMID 24068654
Cites: J Adv Pract Oncol. 2013 Sep;4(5):289-306 PMID 25032009
Cites: Mol Vis. 2016 Jun 09;22:599-609 PMID 27293376
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Oct 15;53(5):748-55 PMID 16208669
Cites: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2017;2017:7952417 PMID 28491112
Cites: J Altern Complement Med. 2009 Apr;15(4):331-9 PMID 19388855
Cites: Ambul Pediatr. 2004 Nov-Dec;4(6):482-7 PMID 15548098
Cites: Med Oncol. 2016 Jul;33(7):78 PMID 27300549
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2001 Jun;45(3):222-7 PMID 11409661
Cites: Integr Cancer Ther. 2015 Jul;14(4):350-8 PMID 25873293
Cites: Am Fam Physician. 2017 Jul 15;96(2):101-107 PMID 28762712
Cites: Integr Cancer Ther. 2017 Mar;16(1):96-103 PMID 27444312
Cites: CA Cancer J Clin. 2017 May 6;67(3):194-232 PMID 28436999
Cites: Oncol Nurs Forum. 2010 Jan;37(1):E7-E15 PMID 20044334
Cites: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2007 Sep 12;7:28 PMID 17850665
Cites: Prim Care. 1997 Dec;24(4):699-714 PMID 9386251
Cites: Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2017 May;295(5):1239-1245 PMID 28331996
Cites: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012 Dec 20;12:259 PMID 23256756
Cites: Oncol Nurs Forum. 2006 Jan 01;33(1):97-104 PMID 16470237
Cites: Therapie. 2002 Sep-Oct;57(5):432-45 PMID 12611197
Cites: J Cancer. 2017 Feb 10;8(3):395-402 PMID 28261340
Cites: Pharm Biol. 2017 Dec;55(1):1263-1273 PMID 28264607
Cites: Tumour Biol. 2017 Apr;39(4):1010428317698353 PMID 28443468
Cites: JAMA Oncol. 2016 Sep 1;2(9):1170-6 PMID 27243607
Cites: P T. 2010 Aug;35(8):461-8 PMID 20844696
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2009 Oct;467(10):2705-22 PMID 19255814
Cites: Oncotarget. 2017 Apr 11;8(15):24401-24414 PMID 28212560
PubMed ID
30111972 View in PubMed
Less detail

Complementary and alternative medicine use in patients before and after a cancer diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298583
Source
Curr Oncol. 2018 08; 25(4):e275-e281
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2018
Author
C A Buckner
R M Lafrenie
J A Dénommée
J M Caswell
D A Want
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences North Research Institute.
Source
Curr Oncol. 2018 08; 25(4):e275-e281
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Biological Products - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Complementary Therapies - methods
Humans
Neoplasms - pathology - therapy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Cancer patients are increasingly seeking out complementary and alternative medicine (cam) and might be reluctant to disclose its use to their oncology treatment team. Often, cam agents are not well studied, and little is known about their potential interactions with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or biologic therapies, and their correlations with outcomes. In the present study, we set out to determine the rate of cam use in patients receiving treatment at a Northern Ontario cancer centre.
Patients reporting for treatment at the Northeast Cancer Centre (necc) in Sudbury, Ontario, were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire to assess cam use. Changes in cam use before, compared with after, diagnosis were also assessed.
Patients in Northern Ontario reported significant cam use both before and after diagnosis. However, as a function of the cam type, cam use was greatly enhanced after cancer diagnosis. For example, the number of patients who reported use of biologic products increased to 51.8% after a cancer diagnosis from 15.6% before a cancer diagnosis. Patients reported much smaller changes in the use of alternative medical systems or spiritual therapy after diagnosis. Vitamin use was reported by 66% of respondents, and the number of different cams used correlated significantly with the reported number of vitamins used.
Use of cam, particularly biologic products, increased significantly after a cancer diagnosis. Further studies are required to examine the effect of cam use on the efficacy and safety of cancer therapies.
PubMed ID
30111972 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exploring spatial trends in Canadian incidence of hospitalization due to myocardial infarction with additional determinants of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275315
Source
Public Health. 2016 Aug 11;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-11-2016
Author
J M Caswell
Source
Public Health. 2016 Aug 11;
Date
Aug-11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To explore the presence of spatial trends among rates of hospitalization due to myocardial infarction across health regions of Canada and the associated role of additional health determinants.
An ecological study was conducted using aggregate data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information for age-standardized rates of myocardial infarction hospitalizations by health region in 2013.
Exploratory spatial data analyses were applied to myocardial infarction hospitalization rates including Moran's I for detecting global spatial autocorrelation. Local spatial dependence was examined using local indicators of spatial autocorrelation (LISA) to better identify the location of potential regional clusters. Linear and spatial regressions were applied to examine the role of additional health determinants.
Significant spatial autocorrelation was observed for hospitalizations due to myocardial infarction for both sexes, independently and combined. This was largely present in the form of geographic disparities with cold spot clusters of low rates in the west, particularly British Columbia, and hot spot clusters of high rates moving east, especially in Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick. Additional disparities were observed with high rates clustered in Northern Ontario compared to clusters of low rates in Southern Ontario. Significant predictors included smoking, average income, education, and overweight or obesity and, after controlling for these, the central cold spot of low rates shifted east to Saskatchewan.
The identification of spatial homogeneity suggests a necessity for better geographic-based preventive measures as determined by the varied needs of particular regions' communities. The demonstration that space matters in this context further indicates that spatial dependence should be included in additional investigations of myocardial infarction incidence and associated hospitalizations.
PubMed ID
27523784 View in PubMed
Less detail