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Acromegaly and cancer risk: a cohort study in Sweden and Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18975
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Jun;13(5):395-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
D. Baris
G. Gridley
E. Ron
E. Weiderpass
L. Mellemkjaer
A. Ekbom
J H Olsen
J A Baron
J F Fraumeni
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7240, USA. barisd@mail.nih.gov
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Jun;13(5):395-400
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acromegaly - complications
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Growth Substances - blood
Humans
Incidence
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Several studies have suggested that patients with acromegaly have an increased risk of benign and malignant neoplasms, especially of the colon. To further investigate this relationship we evaluated cancer risk in population-based cohorts of acromegaly patients in Sweden and Denmark. METHODS: Nationwide registry-based cohorts of patients hospitalized for acromegaly (Denmark 1977-1993; Sweden 1965-1993) were linked to tumor registry data for up to 15-28 years of follow-up, respectively. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to estimate cancer risk among 1634 patients with acromegaly. RESULTS: The patterns of cancer risk in Sweden and Denmark were similar. After excluding the first year of follow-up, 177 patients with acromegaly had a diagnosis of cancer compared with an expected number of 116.5 (SIR = 1.5. 95% CI = 1.3-1.8). Increased risks were found for digestive system cancers (SIR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.62.7), notably of the small intestine (SIR = 6.0, 95% CI = 1.2-17.4), colon (SIR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.6-3.8), and rectum (SIR = 2.5, 95% CI= 1.3-4.2). Risks were also elevated for cancers of the brain (SIR = 2.7, 95% CI= 1.2-5.0). thyroid (SIR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.8-10.9), kidney (SIR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.6-5.5), and bone (SIR= 13.8, 95% CI= 1.7-50.0). CONCLUSIONS: The increased risk for several cancer sites among acromegaly patients may be due to the elevated proliferative and anti-apoptotic activity associated with increased circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Pituitary irradiation given to some patients may have contributed to the excess risks of brain tumors and thyroid cancer. Our findings indicate the need for close medical surveillance of patients with acromegaly, and further studies of the IGF-I system in the etiology of various cancers.
PubMed ID
12146843 View in PubMed
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Admission for and mortality from primary venous thromboembolism in women of fertile age in Denmark, 1977-95.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200765
Source
BMJ. 1999 Sep 25;319(7213):820-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1999
Author
L. Mellemkjaer
H T Sørensen
L. Dreyer
J. Olsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, DK-2 100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. lene@cancer.dk
Source
BMJ. 1999 Sep 25;319(7213):820-1
Date
Sep-25-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Contraceptives, Oral - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Survival Rate
Thromboembolism - mortality - therapy
Venous Thrombosis - mortality - therapy
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1995 Dec 16;346(8990):1575-827500748
Cites: Lancet. 1995 Dec 16;346(8990):1589-937500750
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Jan 13;312(7023):83-88555935
Cites: Lancet. 1996 Aug 10;348(9024):401-28709744
Cites: Lancet. 1996 Aug 10;348(9024):4028709745
Comment In: BMJ. 1999 Sep 25;319(7213):795-610496802
PubMed ID
10496825 View in PubMed
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Air pollution from traffic at the residence of children with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19980
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2001
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
O. Hertel
B L Thomsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen 0, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Date
Mar-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Benzene - adverse effects
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
Abstract
The hypothesis that exposure to traffic-related air pollution increases the risk of developing cancer during childhood was investigated. The authors enrolled 1,989 children reported to the Danish Cancer Registry with a diagnosis of leukemia, tumor of the central nervous system, or malignant lymphoma during 1968-1991 and 5,506 control children selected at random from the entire childhood population. The residential histories of the children were traced from 9 months before birth until the time of diagnosis of the cases and a similar period for the controls. For each of the 18,440 identified addresses, information on traffic and the configuration of streets and buildings was collected. Average concentrations of benzene and nitrogen dioxide (indicators of traffic-related air pollution) were calculated for the relevant period, and exposures to air pollution during pregnancy and during childhood were calculated separately. The risks of leukemia, central nervous system tumors, and all selected cancers combined were not linked to exposure to benzene or nitrogen dioxide during either period. The risk of lymphomas increased by 25% (p for trend = 0.06) and 51% (p for trend = 0.05) for a doubling of the concentration of benzene and nitrogen dioxide, respectively, during the pregnancy. The association was restricted to Hodgkin's disease.
PubMed ID
11226975 View in PubMed
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Ambient air levels and the exposure of children to benzene, toluene, and xylenes in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34102
Source
Environ Res. 1997 Nov;75(2):149-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
C. Lohse
B L Thomsen
H. Skov
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Division for Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Environ Res. 1997 Nov;75(2):149-59
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Benzene - analysis - toxicity
Child
Denmark
Environmental Exposure
Environmental health
Female
Humans
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health
Toluene - analysis - toxicity
Urban health
Xylenes - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
The aims of the study were to evaluate if the front-door concentrations of benzene, toluene, and xylenes can be used to classify the personal exposures of Danish children and to identify factors that affect their personal exposure. Average concentrations were measured over 1 week with diffusive samplers, and the personal exposures of 98 children and the concentrations outside the front doors of their homes were measured simultaneously. Time and activity patterns were noted in diaries. The front-door concentrations were significantly higher in Copenhagen than in rural areas (all P
PubMed ID
9417846 View in PubMed
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An air pollution model for use in epidemiological studies: evaluation with measured levels of nitrogen dioxide and benzene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199269
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 2000 Jan-Feb;10(1):4-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
O. Hertel
E. Vignati
R. Berkowicz
S S Jensen
V B Larsen
C. Lohse
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen O. ole@cancer.dk
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 2000 Jan-Feb;10(1):4-14
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - analysis
Benzene - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Denmark
Environmental pollution - analysis
Epidemiologic Studies
Half-Life
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Research Design
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the predictions derived from the Danish Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM) when the input data are obtained by simple methods that could be used in large-scale epidemiological studies. The model calculations were thus compared with passive sampler measurements of nitrogen dioxide and benzene at 103 street locations in Copenhagen, Denmark, and at 101 locations in rural areas. Data on traffic and street configuration were collected by means of a simple registration scheme in which forms were filled out by local municipal authorities. Meteorological data were derived from routine measurements at Copenhagen airport, and data on background air pollution were based on a simple empirical model. Differences in air pollution levels between rural areas and Copenhagen and differences in nitrogen dioxide concentrations at various locations in Copenhagen were well reproduced by the OSPM. The correlation coefficients (r) between the measured and the predicted half-year average concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in Copenhagen were between 0.75 and 0.80 for various degrees of precision of the input data for the model. The results indicate that the OSPM used with the presented methods for generation of input data might be useful in assessing long-term exposure to air pollutants in epidemiological studies.
PubMed ID
10703843 View in PubMed
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Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and the risk of cancer: a population-based cohort study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19411
Source
Cancer. 2001 Nov 1;92(9):2462-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2001
Author
S. Friis
H T Sørensen
L. Mellemkjaer
J K McLaughlin
G L Nielsen
W J Blot
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. friis@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer. 2001 Nov 1;92(9):2462-70
Date
Nov-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Incidence
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A recent observational study suggested that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors protects against cancer in general and against breast and female reproductive tract cancers in particular. To explore these hypotheses, the authors examined cancer risk among users of ACE inhibitors in North Jutland County, Denmark. METHODS: Using data from the population-based Prescription Database of North Jutland County and the Danish Cancer Registry, cancer incidence among 17,897 individuals prescribed ACE inhibitors was compared with expected incidence based on county specific cancer rates during an 8-year study period with a mean follow-up of 3.7 years. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for cancers overall and at selected sites. In addition, the authors performed a direct comparison of users of ACE inhibitors with users of beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers (n = 47,579 individuals) by means of a Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Overall, 909 cancer cases were observed among users of ACE inhibitors, with 846 expected based on general population rates, yielding an SIR of 1.07 (95% CI, 1.01-1.15). No risk reductions were observed for cancers of the breast and female reproductive tract, whereas nonsignificantly decreased SIRs were observed for cancers of the esophagus, stomach, and liver. Cancer of the kidney was found in significant excess (SIR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.2). Stratification by duration of follow-up or number of prescriptions revealed no apparent trends, except for a tendency toward decreasing risk with increasing length of follow-up for smoking-related cancers. The direct comparison of users of ACE inhibitors with users of beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers yielded results comparable to those derived from the comparison with the general population, with a hazard ratio for cancer overall of 1.01 (95% CI, 0.93-1.09). CONCLUSIONS: This large, population-based cohort study did not confirm a protective effect of ACE inhibitors on the development of cancer. The excess of kidney cancer observed likely reflects a correlation between hypertension and kidney cancer. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of ACE inhibitors beyond the observation period of this and previous studies. Also, the suggestive evidence of decreased risks for upper digestive system cancers and for smoking-related cancers over time may warrant additional investigation.
PubMed ID
11745304 View in PubMed
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Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Feb;12(2):173-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
L. Mellemkjaer
C. Emborg
G. Gridley
P. Munk-Jørgensen
C. Johansen
A. Tjønneland
S K Kjaer
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen. lene@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Feb;12(2):173-7
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Poisson Distribution
Reference Values
Registries
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Energy restriction reduces the incidence of malignant tumors in experimental animals, but evidence for a similar effect in humans is lacking. To test the hypothesis in humans, we investigated cancer incidence among patients with anorexia nervosa, who have had an extremely low intake of calories for prolonged periods of their lives. METHODS: Patients with anorexia nervosa (2151 women and 186 men) during 1970-1993 were identified in the population-based Danish Psychiatric Case Register and the National Registry of Patients. The cohort was linked to the Danish Cancer Registry, and cancer incidence among cohort members was compared with that of the general population. RESULTS: The overall cancer incidence among women with anorexia nervosa was reduced by a factor of 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.52-1.18) below that of the general population on the basis of 25 observed and 31.4 expected cases. Among men, two cases of cancer were observed, both confined to the brain, whereas 0.2 cases were expected. CONCLUSIONS: The finding of a slight reduction in cancer risk among women with anorexia nervosa may support the theory that a low-energy diet may decrease tumor development in humans. However, longer follow-up and control for confounding factors are needed to obtain more convincing evidence.
PubMed ID
11246846 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant medications and risk for cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20211
Source
Epidemiology. 2000 Mar;11(2):171-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
S O Dalton
C. Johansen
L. Mellemkjaer
H T Sørensen
J K McLaughlin
J. Olsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
Epidemiology. 2000 Mar;11(2):171-6
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Pharmacoepidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Antidepressants appear to promote tumor growth in experimental studies; however, results from epidemiologic studies are inconclusive. We used a population-based cohort study to estimate the incidence of cancer after antidepressant treatment in 39,807 adult users of antidepressants identified in the Prescription Database of the County of North Jutland, Denmark between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 1995. Information on cancer occurrence was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. We categorized exposure according to use of tricyclic antidepressants, tetracyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or monoamine oxidase inhibitors. In the follow-up period beginning 1 year after first known prescription, there were 966 cancers among users of antidepressants; our population estimate suggested an expected number of 946 for an overall standardized incidence ratio of 1.0 (95% confidence interval = 1.0-1.1). Users of tricyclic antidepressants had an excess of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, with the risk increasing with the number of prescriptions of tricyclic antidepressants. The standardized incidence ratio was 2.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.4-4.2) for those with five or more prescriptions. Our results provide little evidence that antidepressants promote cancer at other sites, except for a possible effect of tricyclic antidepressants and tetracyclic antidepressants on non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
PubMed ID
11021615 View in PubMed
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Antiepileptic treatment and risk for hepatobiliary cancer and malignant lymphoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11457
Source
Cancer Res. 1995 Jan 15;55(2):294-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1995
Author
J H Olsen
G. Schulgen
J D Boice
J. Whysner
L B Travis
G M Williams
F B Johnson
J O McGee
Author Affiliation
Division for Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Cancer Res. 1995 Jan 15;55(2):294-7
Date
Jan-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biliary Tract Neoplasms - chemically induced
Case-Control Studies
Epilepsy - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - chemically induced
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced
Male
Middle Aged
Phenobarbital - adverse effects
Phenytoin - adverse effects
Thorium Dioxide - adverse effects
Abstract
The possible influence of phenobarbital and phenytoin treatment on cancer risk was investigated in a case-control study nested in a cohort of 8004 epileptic patients in Denmark. Information on anticonvulsive treatments was abstracted for 95% of 60 patients with cancers of the liver and biliary tract or malignant lymphoma and for 94% of 171 cancer-free control patients. Use of anticonvulsive drugs was correlated with angiographic procedures that used Thorotrast, a well-known human liver carcinogen. After exclusion of study subjects exposed to Thorotrast, no association was seen between treatment with phenobarbital and cancer of the liver (odds ratio, 1.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-8.0) or biliary tract (odds ratio, 0.8; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-4.2). Furthermore, a histopathological evaluation of slides from 7 of 9 liver cancer patients not treated with Thorotrast revealed that 3 of the 4 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma involved cirrhosis of the liver, which suggested an etiological role for alcohol or viral hepatitis. A possible link was observed between use of phenytoin and risk for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (1.8; 0.5-6.6), with a rising trend in risk with increasing dose. Our results suggest that the increased risk for cancers of the liver and biliary tract among Danish epileptic patients is likely to be due to Thorotrast administration and factors associated with cirrhosis of the liver rather than to anticonvulsive treatment.
PubMed ID
7812960 View in PubMed
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201 records – page 1 of 21.