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Accident prevention activities in the Norwegian municipalities: the local response to a nationwide campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36240
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):129-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
F. Thuen
J G Maeland
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Health Promotion, University of Bergen.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):129-34
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Adult
Child
Consumer Participation - trends
Health Education - trends
Health Plan Implementation
Health Promotion - trends
Humans
Norway
Patient care team
Abstract
The Norwegian "Campaign Against Home Accidents" was launched nationwide during 1988 to 1991, with the goal of reducing the incidence of home accidents by 20%. The aim of the campaign was to urge primarily the municipal health services to form local accident prevention groups and to implement local measures for prevention of home accidents. On the basis of two surveys, after one year and at the end of the national campaign, an evaluation was carried out concerning the participation of the municipal health services in the campaign and the impact of the campaign on local accident prevention activities. The results indicate that the national campaign engaged the majority of the municipalities and stimulated local accident prevention work to some extent. Most local activities were health education measures, whereas environmental intervention were less commonly reported. Involvement in the campaign was the variable most related to level of accident prevention activities at the end of the campaign period. However, the relationship was only modest. Restricted economical resources, too little emphasis on environmental change, lack of political involvement and insufficient use of coalition partners at the community level are suggested as the major explanations for the limited effect of the campaign.
PubMed ID
8367680 View in PubMed
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[Chief medical officers and preventive health care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49315
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 30;113(3):351-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1993
Author
E. Boonstra
J G Maeland
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalforeningens HEMIL-senter, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 30;113(3):351-5
Date
Jan-30-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - manpower
Decision Making
English Abstract
Health Promotion - manpower
Norway
Physician's Role
Policy Making
Preventive Medicine - manpower
Public Health Administration - manpower
Abstract
A survey conducted among all Norwegian Chief Municipal Medical Officers, provided information about their formal role and involvement in health promotion work. Of the total respondents, 71% regularly attended meetings of the Municipal Board of Health and 32% attended meetings of the Building Council; 80% had authority to forward proposals to the Board of Health on matters of environmental health. On average, the Chief Municipal Medical Officers spent one-fifth of their working time on community health promotion activities. 80% of the respondents would have liked to spend more time on these activities. These officials should have a stronger formal position in the field of health promotion, and they themselves should give higher priority to health promotion work.
PubMed ID
8441985 View in PubMed
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[Environmental health promotion in municipalities--resources, organization and activities]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49302
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Aug 30;113(20):2591-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1993
Author
J G Maeland
F. Boonstra
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalforeningens Hemil-senter, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Aug 30;113(20):2591-6
Date
Aug-30-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Environmental health
Health education
Health planning
Health promotion
Health Resources
Humans
Norway
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Municipal Health Services Act with amendments from 1988 defines environmental health promotion activities directed at physical, chemical, biological and social factors as mandatory for the local Norwegian health authorities. In addition, the municipal health services are responsible for health surveillance and for initiating cross-sectorial preventive measures. In 1991, we undertook a national survey among the Norwegian municipal health services to monitor planning activities, manpower resources, cross-sectorial cooperation, and project-oriented activities within the field of environmental health promotion. Less than one-third of the municipalities employed technically trained hygienic personnel. However, three of four municipalities had carried out some environmental health promotion projects within the last two years. The following factors were all independently related to level of environmental health promotion activity: the availability of technical assistance, the level of cross-sectorial cooperation and the size of the population in the municipality. We conclude that this area of health promotion should be improved by better planning, a higher level of technical hygienic competence within the municipal health services, more inter-sectorial cooperation and greater emphasis on visible projects of limited duration.
PubMed ID
8236183 View in PubMed
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The importance of self-efficacy in cardiovascular risk factor change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49935
Source
Scand J Public Health. 1999 Mar;27(1):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
E. Meland
J G Maeland
E. Laerum
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 1999 Mar;27(1):11-7
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Exercise
Family Practice
Health Behavior
Health education
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - prevention & control
Norway
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Self Efficacy
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
SUBJECTS AND DESIGN: The study was based on the total patient sample (n = 110) of a randomized controlled trial comparing two intervention methods advising cardiovascular high-risk men of lifestyle changes in general practice. Behaviour and risk factor changes during the one-year intervention study were analysed using multiple regression and logistic regression analyses with the above-mentioned independent variables. SETTING: Twenty-two general practice centres in the county of Hordaland, western Norway. RESULTS: Self-efficacy of increased physical exercise was the only variable significantly related to exercise change. Age and self-efficacy were statistical significant predictors of smoking cessation success. None of the independent variables was statistically significantly related to blood pressure or cholesterol change. Educational level related negatively, although statistically insignificantly, with total risk change. CONCLUSION: The study confirms the importance of self-efficacy in both human behaviour and motivation for behaviour change. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the study were to explore the impact of possible predictors for cardiovascular risk behaviour change, predictors such as education, age, self-efficacy, doctors' interpersonal skills, and number of appointments.
PubMed ID
10847665 View in PubMed
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Influence of clinical and demographic variables on quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46284
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1999 Apr;66(4):431-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
K H Karlsen
J P Larsen
E. Tandberg
J G Maeland
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Central Hospital of Rogaland, Stavanger, Norway.
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1999 Apr;66(4):431-5
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pain Measurement
Parkinson disease - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Regression Analysis
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To identify the clinical and demographic factors that are associated with a poor quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease. METHODS: 233 of a total of 245 patients identified in a community based study in a Norwegian county participated in the study. Quality of life was measured by the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). The results were compared with those in 100 healthy elderly people. Clinical and demographic variables were determined during a semistructured interview and by clinical examination by a neurologist. Multiple regression analyses were used to determine which variables were associated with higher distress scores. RESULTS: Patients with Parkinson's disease had higher distress scores than the healthy elderly people for all the NHP dimensions. The variables that most strongly predicted a high total NHP score were depressive symptoms, self reported insomnia, and a low degree of independence, measured by the Schwab and England scale. Severity of parkinsonism contributed, but to a lesser extent. Nearly half the patients with Parkinson's disease reported lack of energy, compared with a fifth of the control group. Severity of depressive symptoms and a higher score on the UPDRS motor subscale only partly accounted for this finding. Only 30% of the variation in NHP energy score was explained by the predictive variables identified in this study. CONCLUSIONS: Parkinson's disease has a substantial impact on health related quality of life. Depressive symptoms and sleep disorders correlated strongly with high distress scores. Patients with Parkinson's disease should be examined for both conditions, which require treatment. Low energy was commonly reported and may be a separate entity of Parkinson's disease.
Notes
Comment In: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1999 Apr;66(4):41610201410
PubMed ID
10201412 View in PubMed
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Life style intervention in general practice: effects on psychological well-being and patient satisfaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54652
Source
Qual Life Res. 1996 Jun;5(3):348-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
E. Meland
E. Laerum
J G Maeland
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Qual Life Res. 1996 Jun;5(3):348-54
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - prevention & control - psychology
Family Practice
Health Behavior
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Self Care - psychology
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to: (1) study if an opportunistic screening of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors among male attenders in general practice (GP) influenced the overall subjective satisfaction with life of persons labelled 'high risk' compared to other screened persons; (2) compare psychological well-being and patient satisfaction in a patient centred and self-directive (PCSD) intervention with conventional care (CC); and (3) evaluate patient satisfaction and psychological well-being among subjects with high CHD risk during a one year intervention study. Effects of 'labelling' were evaluated in 115 subjects with high CHD risk in comparison with a low risk reference population. The 22 participating GP centres were randomly allocated to follow either a PCSD intervention or a CC approach. An overall satisfaction with life question was employed and psychological well-being were measured using the General Health Questionnaire (20 item version). Satisfaction measures on health care aspects were also included. No difference of change between the high risk and the reference population was found concerning satisfaction with life after screening. No significant difference of change was found within or between the PCSD and the CC group concerning emotional well-being or overall satisfaction with life during one year intervention. Satisfaction with the care received was significantly better in the CC group as compared with the PCSD group (p = 0.02). Satisfaction with own efforts for improving health was, however, more pronounced in the PCSD group (p = 0.01). A substantial number (n = 61) of the participants reported distaste of being reminded of the risk of heart disease and no more than 60 of the participants were satisfied with their own efforts for improving health. Although no significant change of satisfaction with life and emotional well-being due to screening or intervention could be detected, clinicians should be aware that encouraging patients to change life style may lead to patients' annoyance of being reminded of the risk of disease and dissatisfaction with their own efforts. Increasing patient responsibility and self-determination may improve their satisfaction with their own efforts, but reduce satisfaction with medical care.
PubMed ID
8763803 View in PubMed
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[Locally based health promotion. Meetings of citizens as a tool for population mobilization]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73496
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Apr 10;112(10):1323-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-1992
Author
E. Boonstra
J G Maeland
Author Affiliation
Askvoll legesenter.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Apr 10;112(10):1323-7
Date
Apr-10-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
English Abstract
Female
Health Education - methods - organization & administration
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Public Opinion
Abstract
It is necessary to involve the local population to a greater extent in the work of health promotion and prevention of disease. In the municipality of Askvoll the results of a household survey were used as an educational tool at popular meetings in the different settlements. At these meetings, the local citizens themselves chose actual health promotion projects and elected committees to carry them out. The article describes our experiences from this way of mobilizing the community. The attendance rate varied from 3% to 29% of the local population aged over 15 years. More women than men participated. A total of 17 local projects were chosen. We conclude that popular meetings can be a useful tool in local health promotion work.
PubMed ID
1579919 View in PubMed
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Multiple sclerosis and lifestyle factors: the Hordaland Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9041
Source
Neurol Sci. 2005 Dec;26(5):334-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
M W Nortvedt
T. Riise
J G Maeland
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, Research Department, Møllendalsveien 6, Norway. mwn@hib.no
Source
Neurol Sci. 2005 Dec;26(5):334-9
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Motor Activity
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking
Abstract
This study compared multiple sclerosis (MS) patients (n=87) with the general population and with people reporting angina pectoris (n=109), asthma (n=1,353) and diabetes (n=219) regarding health-related quality of life (SF-12), working status and lifestyle factors including smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI) and leisure physical activity. The study was cross-sectional and included the birth cohorts from 1950 to 1957 living in Hordaland County, Norway in 1997. A total of 22,312 people participated, yielding a response rate of 65%. The MS patients had a high rate of smoking and a low mean BMI, despite lower leisure physical activity compared with the rest of the study population. This suggests that it may be advisable to increase the focus on smoking, physical activity and the balance between energy intake and use.
PubMed ID
16388368 View in PubMed
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Predicting long-term mortality after a myocardial infarction from routine hospital data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55534
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;224(6):539-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
J G Maeland
K. Meen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Hygiene and Social Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;224(6):539-47
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Norway
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Among 528 patients under 67 years of age discharged alive after a myocardial infarction (MI), the cumulative survival rates after 3, 5, and 7 years were 84.1%, 75.9% and 68.6%, respectively. Compared with the "normal" population, the relative mortality risk was 4.8 for the first year, 3.1 for the second, and on average 2.1 for the next 5 years. Significant age differences were not observed for relative mortality. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model showed long-term mortality to be independently related to higher age, a reduced working activity before the MI, previous cardiovascular disease, and a higher inhospital complication score, which was computed by summing eight defined clinical events weighted for severity. The results indicate that a reasonable prediction of long-term survival after a MI can be made from routine hospital data.
PubMed ID
3207066 View in PubMed
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Return to work after a myocardial infarction: the influence of background factors, work characteristics and illness severity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55638
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1986;14(4):183-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
J G Maeland
O E Havik
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1986;14(4):183-95
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Employment
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - rehabilitation
Norway
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological
Urban Population
Abstract
The relationship between return to work (RTW) within 6 months after a myocardial infarction (MI) and selected demographic factors, characteristics of prior work situation, pre-MI health status, and clinical severity of the MI has been studied in 249 patients below 67 years of age living in urban and rural areas of Western Norway. At the follow-up 8 out of 10 urban patients and 6 out of 10 rural patients were back at work. The RTW rate for the total sample was 73%. Age below 51 years, high educational and income level, working in tertiary industries, and in a job characterized by low physical activity and little psychosocial stress were all factors associated with a favourable work resumption. Multivariate analyses showed that socioeconomic or work-related factors could not fully explain the urban-rural differences in RTW. Stepwise discriminant analysis identified the following factors as important and independent predictors for RTW: Place of residence, age, education, perceived job stress, and clinical complications during hospitalization. Failure to return to work after a MI can be explained by a number of individual and social factors and only to a limited degree by the medical status of the patient. More knowledge is needed concerning the socio-cultural differences among both patients and attending physicians in attitudes towards work resumption after a MI.
PubMed ID
3787212 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.