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Alcohol drinking and risk of subsequent hospitalisation with pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100920
Source
Eur Respir J. 2011 Jun 9;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-9-2011
Author
J B Kornum
K M Due
M. Nørgaard
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
H T Sørensen
R W Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Clinical Institute, Aarhus University Hospital Aarhus Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2011 Jun 9;
Date
Jun-9-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The dose-response relationship between alcohol consumption and pneumonia risk in healthy individuals is poorly understood. We examined 22,485 males and 24,682 females from Denmark who were aged 50-64 yrs. Subjects were without major chronic diseases at baseline and had median 12 yrs follow-up for first-time hospitalisation with pneumonia. 1,091 (males) and 944 (females) had a pneumonia-related hospitalisation. Among males, the risk of pneumonia was increased for alcohol abstainers and those who drank large weekly amounts: Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for 0, 7-20, 21-34, 35-50, and >50 drinks per week were 1.49 (95% CI 1.00-2.21), 0.88 (0.76-1.03), 0.87 (0.72-1.05), 1.15 (0.93-1.44), and 1.81 (1.40-2.33), respectively, compared with 1-6 drinks per week. The association between high alcohol intake and pneumonia persisted after controlling for subsequent chronic diseases. Among females, HRs for 0, 7-20, 21-35, and >35 drinks weekly were 1.26 (0.89-1.79), 1.01 (0.88-1.17), 1.10 (0.88-1.37), and 0.54 (0.29-1.01), respectively. For the same moderate to high weekly alcohol amount, infrequent intake yielded higher pneumonia HRs than more regular intake in both sexes. Regular moderate alcohol intake is not associated with increased risk of hospitalisation for pneumonia. High weekly alcohol consumption in males and infrequent heavy drinking in both sexes may increase pneumonia risk.
PubMed ID
21659417 View in PubMed
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Obesity and risk of subsequent hospitalisation with pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144594
Source
Eur Respir J. 2010 Dec;36(6):1330-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
J B Kornum
M. Nørgaard
C. Dethlefsen
K M Due
R W Thomsen
A. Tjønneland
H T Sørensen
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Dept of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. j.kornum@rn.dk
Source
Eur Respir J. 2010 Dec;36(6):1330-6
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Body mass index
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Obesity may be associated with increased risk of pneumonia, but available data on this relationship are sparse and inconsistent. We followed a prospective cohort of 22,578 males and 25,973 females from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study, aged 50-64 yrs and free from major chronic diseases at baseline (1993-1997), for first-time hospitalisation with pneumonia (median follow-up 12 yrs). Compared with males of normal weight, adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for pneumonia were 1.4 (95% CI 1.2-1.7) for males with moderate obesity (body mass index (BMI) 30.0-34.9 kg·m?²), and 2.0 (95% CI 1.4-2.8) for males with severe obesity (BMI = 35.0 kg·m?²), controlling for lifestyle and educational variables. Among females the associations were weaker, with adjusted HRs of 0.8 (95% CI 0.6-1.0) for moderate obesity, and 1.2 (95% CI 0.8-1.6) for severe obesity. Adjustment for major chronic diseases diagnosed during follow-up eliminated the associations between obesity and pneumonia risk. Obesity is associated with higher risk of hospitalisation with pneumonia among males but not among females, which is apparently explained by occurrence of other chronic diseases.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Respir J. 2011 May;37(5):1298; author reply 1299-130021532024
Comment In: Eur Respir J. 2011 May;37(5):1299; author reply 1299-130021532025
PubMed ID
20351023 View in PubMed
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