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Change in psychotropic drug use in Norwegian nursing homes between 2004 and 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297761
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 03; 30(3):385-394
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
G Selbæk
S I M Janus
S Bergh
K Engedal
S Ruths
A S Helvik
J Šaltyte Benth
S U Zuidema
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Ageing and Health,Vestfold Hospital Trust,Tønsberg,Norway.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 03; 30(3):385-394
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Behavioral Symptoms - drug therapy - psychology
Cognition Disorders - drug therapy - psychology
Cohort Studies
Dementia - drug therapy - psychology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
ABSTRACTBackground:We aimed to assess whether there were any changes in the use of psychotropic drugs in Norwegian nursing homes between 2004 and 2011. Also, we investigated whether the predictors of use of specific psychotropic drug groups have changed.
We conducted a secondary analysis of two cohort studies of two Norwegian nursing home samples (2004/05 and 2010/11). Multivariate models were applied.
We found a significant decrease in the prescription of antipsychotic drugs between 2004 and 2011 (0.63 OR, 95%CI = 0.49-0.82, p
PubMed ID
28988552 View in PubMed
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Frequency and subgroups of neuropsychiatric symptoms in mild cognitive impairment and different stages of dementia in Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296118
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 01; 30(1):103-113
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
N Siafarikas
G Selbaek
T Fladby
J Šaltyte Benth
E Auning
D Aarsland
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry,Akershus University Hospital,Lørenskog,Norway.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 01; 30(1):103-113
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cognitive Dysfunction - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), such as depression, apathy, agitation, and psychotic symptoms are common in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Subgroups of NPS have been reported. Yet the relationship of NPS and their subgroups to different stages of cognitive impairment is unclear. Most previous studies are based on small sample sizes and show conflicting results. We sought to examine the frequency of NPS and their subgroups in MCI and different stages of dementia in AD.
This was a cross-sectional study using data from a Norwegian national registry of memory clinics. From a total sample of 4,571 patients, we included those with MCI or AD (MCI 817, mild AD 883, moderate-severe AD 441). To compare variables across groups ANOVA or ? 2-test was applied. We used factor analysis of Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire (NPI-Q) items to identify subgroups of NPS.
The frequency of any NPS was 87.2% (AD 91.2%, MCI 79.5%; p
PubMed ID
28927477 View in PubMed
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The impact of dementia on the use of general practitioners among the elderly in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275243
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):199-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
A E Ydstebø
S. Bergh
G. Selbæk
J Šaltyte Benth
H. Lurås
C. Vossius
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):199-205
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - therapy
Female
General practice
General practitioners
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Home Care Services
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motivation
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
To assess the use of general practitioners (GPs), in elderly home-dwelling persons in Norway and explore the impact of cognitive decline, age, and living situation.
Prospective longitudinal study.
Data were collected from municipalities in four counties in Norway in the period from January 2009 to August 2012.
Home-dwelling persons 70 years of age or older, receiving in-home care.
Use of GPs over a period of 18 months related to cognitive state, functional status, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and demographics.
A total of 599 persons were included. The mean annual number of consultations per participant was 5.6 (SD = 5.4). People with moderate to severe dementia had fewer consultations per year compared with those with mild or no dementia (3.7 versus 5.8 per year, p = 0.004). In the multivariate model higher age predicted fewer consultations while affective neuropsychiatric symptoms were associated with an increase in frequency of consultations. The most frequent reason to consult a GP was cardiovascular diseases (36.8% of all consultations), followed by musculoskeletal complaints (12.1%) and psychiatric diagnoses (8.7%).
Our study shows that the home-dwelling elderly with moderate to severe dementia in Norway consult their GP less often than persons with mild or no dementia. This could indicate a need for better interaction between the municipal care and social services and the general practitioners.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26294095 View in PubMed
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Modelling and prediction of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in Norwegian relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122455
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2012;39(2):84-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
J. Saltyte Benth
K-M Myhr
K I Løken-Amsrud
A G Beiske
K S Bjerve
H. Hovdal
R. Midgard
T. Holmøy
Author Affiliation
HØKH, Research Centre, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. jurates@medisin.uio.no
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2012;39(2):84-93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - blood
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Seasons
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels are suggested to influence the susceptibility and risk of disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Seasonal fluctuation of 25(OH)D levels may differ in magnitude between individuals. The purpose of this paper was to model the seasonal fluctuation of vitamin D in Norwegian MS patients and to examine to which extent one single 25(OH)D measurement predicts the level at other time points throughout the year.
During December 2004 and July 2008, 762 serum samples were collected from 92 Norwegian relapsing-remitting MS patients. Time series analysis and multivariate modelling techniques were used to model seasonal fluctuations and intra- and inter-individual variations in 25(OH)D values.
Most patients reached their lowest 25(OH)D level in March/April and the highest in July/August. There were substantial intra-individual variations in the extent of seasonal fluctuation, with 36.6% of explainable variation in seasonally adjusted 25(OH)D levels (on a logarithmic scale) attributable to the patient level. The remaining 63.4% could be accounted for by sources of inter-individual variation. Both the total and inter-individual variabilities were lowest in February, and the prediction interval in this month was up to 26% narrower compared to other months. The prediction intervals would be at least 21% wider with only one observation available per patient.
The seasonal fluctuations of 25(OH)D levels in Norwegian relapsing-remitting MS patients are subject to pronounced intra- and inter-individual variation. The most representative measurements of 25(OH)D levels are taken in February.
Notes
Comment In: Neuroepidemiology. 2012;39(2):94-522814145
PubMed ID
22814117 View in PubMed
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