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Canada's evacuation policy for pregnant First Nations women: Resignation, resilience, and resistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289757
Source
Women Birth. 2018 Feb 10; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-10-2018
Author
Karen M Lawford
Audrey R Giles
Ivy L Bourgeault
Author Affiliation
School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies, Carleton University, Dunton Tower 1221, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada. Electronic address: karen.lawford@carleton.ca.
Source
Women Birth. 2018 Feb 10; :
Date
Feb-10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Aboriginal peoples in Canada are comprised of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit. Health care services for First Nations who live on rural and remote reserves are mostly provided by the Government of Canada through the federal department, Health Canada. One Health Canada policy, the evacuation policy, requires all First Nations women living on rural and remote reserves to leave their communities between 36 and 38 weeks gestational age and travel to urban centres to await labour and birth. Although there are a few First Nations communities in Canada that have re-established community birthing and Aboriginal midwifery is growing, most First Nations communities are still reliant on the evacuation policy for labour and birthing services. In one Canadian province, Manitoba, First Nations women are evacuated to The Pas, Thompson, or Winnipeg but most - including all women with high-risk pregnancies - go to Winnipeg.
To contribute scholarship that describes First Nations women's and community members' experiences and perspectives of Health Canada's evacuation policy in Manitoba.
Applying intersectional theory to data collected through 12 semi-structured interviews with seven women and five community members (four females, one male) in Manitoba who had experienced the evacuation policy. The data were analyzed thematically, which revealed three themes: resignation, resilience, and resistance.
The theme of resignation was epitomized by the quote, "Nobody has a choice." The ability to withstand and endure the evacuation policy despite poor or absent communication and loneliness informed of resilience. Resistance was demonstrated by women who questioned the necessity and requirement of evacuation for labour and birth. In one instance, resistance took the form of a planned homebirth with Aboriginal registered midwives.
There is a pressing need to improve the maternity care services that First Nations women receive when they are evacuated out of their communities, particularly when understood from the specific legal and constitutional position of First Nations women in Manitoba.
PubMed ID
29439924 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canada's evacuation policy for pregnant First Nations women: Resignation, resilience, and resistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298294
Source
Women Birth. 2018 Dec; 31(6):479-488
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Karen M Lawford
Audrey R Giles
Ivy L Bourgeault
Author Affiliation
School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies, Carleton University, Dunton Tower 1221, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada. Electronic address: karen.lawford@carleton.ca.
Source
Women Birth. 2018 Dec; 31(6):479-488
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Midwifery - methods
Parturition - ethnology
Politics
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - ethnology - psychology
Qualitative Research
Resilience, Psychological
Rural Population
Young Adult
Abstract
Aboriginal peoples in Canada are comprised of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit. Health care services for First Nations who live on rural and remote reserves are mostly provided by the Government of Canada through the federal department, Health Canada. One Health Canada policy, the evacuation policy, requires all First Nations women living on rural and remote reserves to leave their communities between 36 and 38 weeks gestational age and travel to urban centres to await labour and birth. Although there are a few First Nations communities in Canada that have re-established community birthing and Aboriginal midwifery is growing, most First Nations communities are still reliant on the evacuation policy for labour and birthing services. In one Canadian province, Manitoba, First Nations women are evacuated to The Pas, Thompson, or Winnipeg but most - including all women with high-risk pregnancies - go to Winnipeg.
To contribute scholarship that describes First Nations women's and community members' experiences and perspectives of Health Canada's evacuation policy in Manitoba.
Applying intersectional theory to data collected through 12 semi-structured interviews with seven women and five community members (four females, one male) in Manitoba who had experienced the evacuation policy. The data were analyzed thematically, which revealed three themes: resignation, resilience, and resistance.
The theme of resignation was epitomized by the quote, "Nobody has a choice." The ability to withstand and endure the evacuation policy despite poor or absent communication and loneliness informed of resilience. Resistance was demonstrated by women who questioned the necessity and requirement of evacuation for labour and birth. In one instance, resistance took the form of a planned homebirth with Aboriginal registered midwives.
There is a pressing need to improve the maternity care services that First Nations women receive when they are evacuated out of their communities, particularly when understood from the specific legal and constitutional position of First Nations women in Manitoba.
PubMed ID
29439924 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian family physicians and complementary/alternative medicine: the role of practice setting, medical training, and province of practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147935
Source
Can Rev Sociol. 2009 May;46(2):143-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Kristine A Hirschkorn
Robert Andersen
Ivy L Bourgeault
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
Can Rev Sociol. 2009 May;46(2):143-59
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Complementary Therapies - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Family Practice - education - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Language
Logistic Models
Physicians, Family
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study sheds some light on how and why Canadian family physicians offer complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) services to their patients. Our results suggest that organizational settings discourage physicians from offering CAM, while solo clinics are most conducive. Physicians trained in French-language medical schools are less likely than their English-language trained colleagues to offer CAM services, and those in British Columbia are the most likely to do so. Provincial differences do not appear to be related to the presence or absence of "negative proof" legislation that is considered to facilitate CAM provision by physicians.
PubMed ID
19831238 View in PubMed
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Comparing approaches to integrating refugee and asylum-seeking healthcare professionals in Canada and the UK.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105302
Source
Healthc Policy. 2013 Oct;9(Spec Issue):126-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Yvonne Leblanc
Ivy L Bourgeault
Elena Neiterman
Author Affiliation
Instructor, Department of Health, Aging, and Society, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON Instructor, Department of Sociology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON.
Source
Healthc Policy. 2013 Oct;9(Spec Issue):126-38
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Emigrants and Immigrants
Employment
Foreign Medical Graduates
Great Britain
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Nurses
Physicians
Refugees
Abstract
In this paper, we examine barriers to the integration of refugee doctors and nurses in Canada and the United Kingdom. Key obstacles impeding the integration of internationally trained health professionals are well documented, but less attention has been paid to the integration of refugee health professionals, particularly in Canada. Based on documentary analysis and semi-structured interviews with 46 Canadian and 34 UK stakeholders, our research shows that there are no simple solutions to mitigating the core obstacles that prohibit the professional integration of refugee doctors and nurses into host countries. The targeted approach adopted in parts of the UK does provide some promising practices for Canada, which has yet to develop policies and initiatives specific to health professional refugees. This study is intended to contribute to our understanding of how immigration and health human resources policies have shaped the economic integration of refugee healthcare professionals in the UK and Canada in distinct ways.
PubMed ID
24289945 View in PubMed
Less detail