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Mitral annulus motion as a predictor of mortality in a community-based sample of 75-year-old men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76251
Source
J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2006 Jan;19(1):88-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Pär Hedberg
Tommy Jonason
Ingemar Lönnberg
Göran Nilsson
Kenneth Pehrsson
Ivar Ringqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden. par.o.hedberg@ltv.se
Source
J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2006 Jan;19(1):88-94
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comorbidity
Female
Heart Valve Diseases - mortality - ultrasonography
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mitral Valve - ultrasonography
Movement
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - mortality - ultrasonography
Abstract
Mitral annulus motion (MAM) is a predictor of mortality in selected patient groups, but its prognostic value in less selected populations is not known. In a community-based random sample of 75-year-old men and women (n = 408), left ventricular function was measured as: (1) maximum amplitude of MAM; and (2) wall-motion index. During a median follow-up of 7.2 years, 83 persons died (26 from cardiac causes). Left ventricular function as measured by MAM predicted the risk of all-cause and cardiac mortality independently of other potential risk factors in this community-based sample. Regarding cardiac mortality, the predictive ability of MAM was also independent of left ventricular systolic function measured as wall-motion index. MAM may prove to be a valuable complement to other echocardiographic methods in the assessment of prognosis in less selected populations.
PubMed ID
16423675 View in PubMed
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Social background, aspects of lifestyle, body image, relations, school situation, and somatic and psychological symptoms in obese and overweight 15-year-old boys in a county in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9168
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2005 Jun;23(2):95-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Inga-Märit Berg
Bo Simonsson
Ivar Ringqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, County Council of Västmanland, Västerås, Sweden. inga-marit.berg@ltvastmanland.se
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2005 Jun;23(2):95-101
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Body Image
Body mass index
Body Weight
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Obesity - complications - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare lifestyle and health aspects among obese, overweight, and normal-weight 15-year-old boys living in the county of Västmanland, Sweden. DESIGN: A cross-sectional school-based survey. Setting. All schools in the county of Västmanland, Sweden. SUBJECTS: A questionnaire was completed anonymously by 989 boys. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The relations between body mass index and social factors, eating habits, physical activity, body image, relations, school situation, use of alcohol, drugs and tobacco, somatic and psychological symptoms in boys. RESULTS: Obese boys had a significant negative outcome in 19 out of 31 items studied compared with normal-weight boys, while the overweight boys had a significant negative outcome in 9 out of 31. The obese boys reported more irregular eating habits than normal-weight boys, were less satisfied with their weight and looks, and had fewer friends. A larger proportion of the obese boys reported that they did not like school, were more absent from school, and had been exposed to more violence. They bullied their schoolmates more often. The obese boys had tried sniffing solvents and used illicit drugs more frequently than their peers. They reported more somatic and psychological symptoms as well as suicidal thoughts and attempts. CONCLUSIONS: Obese 15-year-old boys differed from overweight and normal-weight boys in lifestyle and in the frequency of somatic and psychological symptoms. Early and vigorous intervention is necessary, as they may belong to a risk group that could develop not only medically but also socially negative consequences.
PubMed ID
16036548 View in PubMed
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[The first successful blood transfer in Sweden: Father's blood saved son's life]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29765
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Mar 7-13;102(10):782
Publication Type
Article
Author
Stellan Hagman
Ivar Ringqvist
Author Affiliation
Hudiksvalls sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Mar 7-13;102(10):782
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - history
Child
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Portraits
Surgery - history
Sweden
PubMed ID
15839172 View in PubMed
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Two different training programmes for patients with COPD: a randomised study with 1-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174857
Source
Respir Med. 2006 Jan;100(1):130-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
R Harpa Arnardóttir
Stefan Sörensen
Ivar Ringqvist
Kjell Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical sciences: Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Ing. 40, 2 tr., Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. harpa.arnardottir@medsci.uu.se
Source
Respir Med. 2006 Jan;100(1):130-9
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Exercise Therapy - methods
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - rehabilitation
Quality of Life
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare the effects on exercise capacity and health related quality of life (HRQoL) of two exercise programmes; one programme including endurance training and one including only resistance training and callisthenics. A second purpose was to find out whether the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affected the training response and whether the interventions had a long-term effect.
Sixty-three patients were stratified according to severity of COPD and randomised to two training groups. Group A had a mixed programme including endurance training. Group B had resistance training and callisthenics. All trained twice weekly for 8 weeks. A symptom-limited ergometer test, 12-min walking test, dynamic spirometry, blood gas analysis at rest and HRQoL were measured before and after the training period. Follow-up tests were conducted at 6 and 12 months after training.
Forty-two patients fulfilled the trial. In group A (n=20) peak exercise capacity increased by 7W (P
PubMed ID
15885996 View in PubMed
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