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[Percutaneous intrarenal ultrasonography]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19973
Source
Urologiia. 2001 Jan-Feb;(1):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
A G Martov
Iu R Saliukova
N G Dovganskaia
A I Demin
Source
Urologiia. 2001 Jan-Feb;(1):40-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Comparative Study
Endosonography - instrumentation
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Kidney Diseases - surgery - ultrasonography
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In vivo and in vitro experiments were made to study percutaneous intrarenal ultrasonography (PIU). The transurethral ultrasonic probe (5.5 MHz, 1850 "Bruel&Kjer, Denmark) was inserted through the nephrostomic fistula in the dilated pelvis with the tubus of the nephroscope K. Storz 27093B. Scanning of the cavitary renal system and ureteropelvic zone was conducted by moving the probe in the longitudinal and transverse directions. The experiment on 21 removed kidneys investigated potentialities of PIU in hydronephrotic transformation caused by ureteropelvic stricture (4 kidneys), urolithiasis (7 kidneys), carcinoma of renal parenchyma (5 kidneys), pelvic cancer (1 kidney), combined renal cell and epithelial renal carcinoma (1 kidney); in pyonephrosis (1 kidney) and contracted kidney (2 kidneys). 43 patients (19 males and 24 females aged 7 to 63 years) have undergone PIU in the course of percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (n = 23), percutaneous endopyelotomy (n = 15) and percutaneous endoresection of solitary renal cyst (n = 5). PIU accurately localizes residual and x-ray-negative concrement fragments raising the effectiveness of percutaneous nephrolithotripsy, precisely differentiates internal renal structures, visualizes pelvic wall, vessels and tissues of the renal sinus, provides additional information about ureteropelvic zone and its changes. PIU can find wide application in intraoperative diagnosis of different renal and upper urinary tract diseases.
PubMed ID
11233231 View in PubMed
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