Skip header and navigation

Refine By

77 records – page 1 of 8.

Age-Related Differences in Functional Nodes of the Brain Cortex - A High Model Order Group ICA Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100265
Source
Front Syst Neurosci. 2010;4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Harri Littow
Ahmed Abou Elseoud
Marianne Haapea
Matti Isohanni
Irma Moilanen
Katariina Mankinen
Juha Nikkinen
Jukka Rahko
Heikki Rantala
Jukka Remes
Tuomo Starck
Osmo Tervonen
Juha Veijola
Christian Beckmann
Vesa J Kiviniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital Oulu, Finland.
Source
Front Syst Neurosci. 2010;4
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Functional MRI measured with blood oxygen dependent (BOLD) contrast in the absence of intermittent tasks reflects spontaneous activity of so-called resting state networks (RSN) of the brain. Group level independent component analysis (ICA) of BOLD data can separate the human brain cortex into 42 independent RSNs. In this study we evaluated age-related effects from primary motor and sensory, and, higher level control RSNs. One hundred sixty-eight healthy subjects were scanned and divided into three groups: 55 adolescents (ADO, 13.2?±?2.4?years), 59 young adults (YA, 22.2?±?0.6?years), and 54 older adults (OA, 42.7?±?0.5?years), all with normal IQ. High model order group probabilistic ICA components (70) were calculated and dual-regression analysis was used to compare 21 RSN's spatial differences between groups. The power spectra were derived from individual ICA mixing matrix time series of the group analyses for frequency domain analysis. We show that primary sensory and motor networks tend to alter more in younger age groups, whereas associative and higher level cognitive networks consolidate and re-arrange until older adulthood. The change has a common trend: both spatial extent and the low frequency power of the RSN's reduce with increasing age. We interpret these result as a sign of normal pruning via focusing of activity to less distributed local hubs.
PubMed ID
20953235 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alexithymia is common among adolescents with severe disruptive behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101585
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2011 Jul;199(7):506-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Marko Manninen
Sebastian Therman
Jaana Suvisaari
Hanna Ebeling
Irma Moilanen
Matti Huttunen
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
*Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; †Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; ‡Clinic of Child Psychiatry, Oulu University and University Hospital, Oulu, Finland; and §Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere and Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2011 Jul;199(7):506-9
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This study aimed to examine alexithymic features and associations between alexithymia and psychiatric symptoms among adolescents living in a closed institution because of severe behavioral problems. Forty-seven adolescents (29 boys and 18 girls) aged 15 to 18 years completed the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) Questionnaire and the Youth Self-Report, whereas their foster parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist. The TAS-20 scores of the participants were compared with those of an extensive population sample (N = 6000) matched by age and birth year. Reform school adolescents are significantly more alexithymic than the control group, and the TAS-20 scores are correlated with numerous psychiatric problems, mainly in the internalizing spectrum, but also with thought problems and self-reported aggression. Promoting abilities in identifying and describing feelings is important when treating delinquent adolescents.
PubMed ID
21716065 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alterations in regional homogeneity of resting-state brain activity in autism spectrum disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98452
Source
Brain Res. 2010 Mar 19;1321:169-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-19-2010
Author
Jyri-Johan Paakki
Jukka Rahko
Xiangyu Long
Irma Moilanen
Osmo Tervonen
Juha Nikkinen
Tuomo Starck
Jukka Remes
Tuula Hurtig
Helena Haapsamo
Katja Jussila
Sanna Kuusikko-Gauffin
Marja-Leena Mattila
Yufeng Zang
Vesa Kiviniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Oulu, PO Box 50, 90029 Oulu, Finland. jyri-johan.paakki@ppshp.fi
Source
Brain Res. 2010 Mar 19;1321:169-79
Date
Mar-19-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Brain - physiopathology
Brain Mapping - methods
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted - methods
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Rest
Abstract
Measures assessing resting-state brain activity with blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can reveal cognitive disorders at an early stage. Analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo) measures the local synchronization of spontaneous fMRI signals and has been successfully utilized in detecting alterations in subjects with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's dementia. Resting-state brain activity was investigated in 28 adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and 27 typically developing controls being imaged with BOLD fMRI and analyzed with the ReHo method. The hypothesis was that ReHo of resting-state brain activity would be different between ASD subjects and controls in brain areas previously shown to display functional alterations in stimulus or task based fMRI studies. Compared with the controls, the subjects with ASD had significantly decreased ReHo in right superior temporal sulcus region, right inferior and middle frontal gyri, bilateral cerebellar crus I, right insula and right postcentral gyrus. Significantly increased ReHo was discovered in right thalamus, left inferior frontal and anterior subcallosal gyrus and bilateral cerebellar lobule VIII. We conclude that subjects with ASD have right dominant ReHo alterations of resting-state brain activity, i.e., areas known to exhibit abnormal stimulus or task related functionality. Our results demonstrate that there is potential in utilizing the ReHo method in fMRI analyses of ASD.
PubMed ID
20053346 View in PubMed
Less detail

An epidemiological study on Finnish school-aged children with learning difficulties and behavioural problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136799
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Feb;70(1):59-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Anja Taanila
Anneli Yliherva
Marika Kaakinen
Irma Moilanen
Hanna Ebeling
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, 90014 University of Oulu, Finland. anja.taanila@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Feb;70(1):59-71
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Learning Disorders - epidemiology
Male
Population
Questionnaires
Social Class
Abstract
To investigate the association between learning difficulties (LDs) and behavioural and emotional problems of 8-year-old children in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (n=9432).
A cross-sectional study.
Teachers assessed children's behaviour with a Rutter scale (RB2) and assessed their learning with questions about whether a child had difficulties in reading, spelling and mathematics.
Of the children, 21.4% (n=1774) had 1 or more learning difficulties (LDs): 12.3% (n=1026) had a verbal LD, 3.0% (n=248) a mathematical LD and 6.0% (n=500) a combined LD. For boys with LDs, an adjusted odds ratio of having behavioural problems was 3.1 (95% CI 2.5-4.0) and emotional problems 3.0 (2.0-4.6), and for girls 3.9 (2.6-5.8) and 5.3 (3.6-8.1), respectively. In boys and girls, verbal difficulties were associated with behavioural and emotional problems whereas mathematical difficulties were associated with behavioural problems in boys and with emotional problems in girls. Divorced and reconstructed family types were significant risk factors for LDs and behavioural problems, whereas a lifelong one-parent family type was a risk factor for behavioural problems, but not for LDs. A child's younger age compared to that of classmates, a mother's and a father's low education level and a low family SES were risk factors for having LDs.
More attention should be paid to children whose families are facing adverse circumstances, especially as it affects their preschool education, in order to support their learning and school attendance.
PubMed ID
21342613 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associated medical disorders and disabilities in children with autistic disorder: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9496
Source
Autism. 2004 Mar;8(1):49-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Marko Kielinen
Heikki Rantala
Eija Timonen
Sirkka-Liisa Linna
Irma Moilanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Clinic of Child Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Autism. 2004 Mar;8(1):49-60
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Autistic Disorder - complications
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosome Aberrations
Disabled Children
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Hearing Disorders - epidemiology
Humans
Hydrocephalus - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tuberous Sclerosis - epidemiology
Abstract
A population-based survey was conducted among 152,732 Finnish children and adolescents aged under 16 years and living in northern Finland. Diagnoses and associated medical conditions were derived from the hospital and institutional records of this area. One hundred and eighty-seven children with DSM-IV autistic disorder were identified. Associated medical disorders or associated disorders of known or suspected genetic origin were found in 12.3 percent, including tuberous sclerosis, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, XYY syndrome, chromosome 17 deletion, chromosome 46, XX, dup(8) (p) and mitochondriopathy. Other associated medical disorders identified were epilepsy, hydrocephalus, foetal alcohol syndrome and cerebral palsy. Hearing impairments were found in 8.6 percent and severe impairment of vision in 3.7 percent of the individuals with autistic disorder. Medical disorders seem to have a special impact on the genesis of autistic disorder and need to be thoroughly examined in each child with autistic disorder.
PubMed ID
15070547 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between childhood specific learning difficulties and school performance in adolescents with and without ADHD symptoms: a 16-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122942
Source
J Atten Disord. 2014 Jan;18(1):61-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Anja Taanila
Hanna Ebeling
Marjo Tiihala
Marika Kaakinen
Irma Moilanen
Tuula Hurtig
Anneli Yliherva
Author Affiliation
1Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Box 5000, 90014 University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Atten Disord. 2014 Jan;18(1):61-72
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Child
Comorbidity
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Learning Disorders - epidemiology
Male
Questionnaires
Registries
Abstract
The authors investigated whether childhood specific learning difficulties (SLDs) predict later school performance in adolescents with ADHD symptoms (ADHDs) and how SLDs associate with educational aspirations.
In the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (n = 9,432), data about children were collected using questionnaires for parents and teachers at ages 7 and 8 and for parents and adolescents at ages 15/16. Information on school performance was obtained from a national register.
The occurrence of SLDs at 8 years was 19.9% (n = 1,198), ADHDs at 15/16 years was 8.0% (n = 530), and comorbid ADHDs and SLDs was 3.0% (n = 179). Having ADHDs but not SLDs or having both was associated with a significantly lower mean value in school grades for theoretical subjects. Adolescents with comorbid ADHDs and SLDs repeated a grade more often, and their educational aspirations were less ambitious than those in other groups.
ADHDs and SLDs have a negative influence on academic achievements.
PubMed ID
22751677 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attention and behavioural problems of Finnish adolescents may be related to the family environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29315
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;14(8):471-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Tuula Hurtig
Anja Taanila
Hanna Ebeling
Jouko Miettunen
Irma Moilanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, 5000, 90014, Finland. tuula.hurtig@oulu.fi
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;14(8):471-8
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Adolescents' attention and behavioural problems in relation to the family environment were studied in the Northern Finland 1986 Birth Cohort. METHOD: Fifteen-year-old adolescents (N=6888) completed the Youth Self-Report (YSR) questionnaire and their parents (N=6643) completed the Strengths and Weaknesses in ADHD and Normal Behaviours (SWAN) questionnaire. The ratings were compared in relation to gender and family characteristics. RESULTS: Girls scored higher than boys on the YSR attention problems subscale (means 4.61 vs. 3.41), the rule-breaking behaviour subscale (means 4.25 vs. 3.69) and the aggressive behaviour subscale (means 7.18 vs. 5.63). Parents reported more SWAN attention problems in their sons than in their daughters. Living in an other than intact family increased YSR and SWAN attention problems and YSR behavioural problems in both genders. Adolescents living in very large families (11-19 children) had least attention and behavioural problems. CONCLUSIONS: Attention and behavioural problems seem to be common among adolescents in Finland. For both genders, living in other than intact families increases especially behavioural problems. Additionally, a very large family seems to be a protective factor against those problems.
PubMed ID
16341505 View in PubMed
Less detail

Autism and the right to education in the EU: policy mapping and scoping review of Nordic countries Denmark, Finland, and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307559
Source
Mol Autism. 2019; 10:44
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
2019
Author
Robin van Kessel
Sebastian Walsh
Amber N V Ruigrok
Rosemary Holt
Anneli Yliherva
Eija Kärnä
Irma Moilanen
Eva Hjörne
Shruti Taneja Johansson
Diana Schendel
Lennart Pedersen
Meta Jørgensen
Carol Brayne
Simon Baron-Cohen
Andres Roman-Urrestarazu
Author Affiliation
1Department of International Health, School CAPHRI, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
Source
Mol Autism. 2019; 10:44
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Autistic Disorder - epidemiology
Databases as Topic
Denmark - epidemiology
Education
European Union
Finland - epidemiology
Human Rights
Humans
Policy
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The universal right to education for people with disabilities has been highlighted by the Universal Declaration on Human Rights and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. In this paper, we mapped policies addressing the right to education and special education needs of autistic children in Denmark, Sweden, and Finland.
A policy path analysis was carried out using a scoping review as an underlying framework for data gathering. Policy mapping was performed independently by both lead authors to increase reliability.
The values of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities have been closely translated into the respective education systems of the countries under study, offering special education needs services and support in mainstream education with the aim of including as many children into mainstream education as possible. Even though the education systems are comparable, the approaches between the countries under study are slightly different. Denmark and Sweden have passed several policies specifically geared towards special education needs, while Finland incorporates this more in general education policy.
All countries under study have incorporated the values of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in their respective education systems while emphasising the need to include as many children in the mainstream system as possible.
PubMed ID
31867091 View in PubMed
Less detail

Autism spectrum disorders according to DSM-IV-TR and comparison with DSM-5 draft criteria: an epidemiological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134110
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;50(6):583-592.e11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Marja-Leena Mattila
Marko Kielinen
Sirkka-Liisa Linna
Katja Jussila
Hanna Ebeling
Risto Bloigu
Robert M Joseph
Irma Moilanen
Author Affiliation
Clinic of Child Psychiatry, University and University Hospital of Oulu, Finland. marja-leena.mattila@fimnet.fi
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;50(6):583-592.e11
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asperger Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Autistic Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Finland
Humans
Intelligence
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mass Screening
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Translating
Abstract
The latest definitions of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were specified in DSM-IV-TR in 2000. DSM-5 criteria are planned for 2013. Here, we estimated the prevalence of ASDs and autism according to DSM-IV-TR, clarified confusion concerning diagnostic criteria, and evaluated DSM-5 draft criteria for ASD posted by the American Psychiatry Association (APA) in February 2010.
This was an epidemiological study of 5,484 eight-year-old children in Finland, 4,422 (81%) of them rated via the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire by parents and/or teachers, and 110 examined by using a structured interview, semi-structured observation, IQ measurement, school-day observation, and patient records. Diagnoses were assigned according to DSM-IV-TR criteria and DSM-5 draft criteria in children with a full-scale IQ (FSIQ) =50. Patient records were evaluated in children with an FSIQ
Notes
Comment In: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;50(6):540-221621137
PubMed ID
21621142 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body mass index and brain white matter structure in young adults at risk for psychosis - The Oulu Brain and Mind Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274906
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2016 Jul 6;254:169-176
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-6-2016
Author
Jenni Koivukangas
Lassi Björnholm
Osmo Tervonen
Jouko Miettunen
Tanja Nordström
Vesa Kiviniemi
Pirjo Mäki
Sari Mukkala
Irma Moilanen
Jennifer H Barnett
Peter B Jones
Juha Nikkinen
Juha Veijola
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2016 Jul 6;254:169-176
Date
Jul-6-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Antipsychotic medications and psychotic illness related factors may affect both weight and brain structure in people with psychosis. Genetically high-risk individuals offer an opportunity to study the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and brain structure free from these potential confounds. We examined the effect of BMI on white matter (WM) microstructure in subjects with familial risk for psychosis (FR). We used diffusion tensor imaging and tract-based spatial statistics to explore the effect of BMI on whole brain FA in 42 (13 males) participants with FR and 46 (16 males) control participants aged 20-25 years drawn from general population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. We also measured axial, radial and mean diffusivities. Most of the participants were normal weight rather than obese. In the FR group, decrease in fractional anisotropy and increase in radial diffusivity were associated with an increase in BMI in several brain areas. In controls the opposite pattern was seen in participants with higher BMI. There was a statistically significant interaction between group and BMI on FA and radial and mean diffusivities. Our results suggest that the effect of BMI on WM differs between individuals with FR for psychosis and controls.
PubMed ID
27474847 View in PubMed
Less detail

77 records – page 1 of 8.