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Active aging - resilience and external support as modifiers of the disablement outcome: AGNES cohort study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299192
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-02-2018
Author
Taina Rantanen
Milla Saajanaho
Laura Karavirta
Sini Siltanen
Merja Rantakokko
Anne Viljanen
Timo Rantalainen
Katja Pynnönen
Anu Karvonen
Inna Lisko
Lotta Palmberg
Johanna Eronen
Eeva-Maija Palonen
Timo Hinrichs
Markku Kauppinen
Katja Kokko
Erja Portegijs
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Univerisity of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35 (viv 149), 40014, Jyväskylä, Finland. taina.rantanen@jyu.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Date
05-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Cohort Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Resilience, Psychological
Social Support
Abstract
Population aging increases the need for knowledge on positive aspects of aging, and contributions of older people to their own wellbeing and that of others. We defined active aging as an individual's striving for elements of wellbeing with activities as per their goals, abilities and opportunities. This study examines associations of health, health behaviors, health literacy and functional abilities, environmental and social support with active aging and wellbeing. We will develop and validate assessment methods for physical activity and physical resilience suitable for research on older people, and examine their associations with active aging and wellbeing. We will examine cohort effects on functional phenotypes underlying active aging and disability.
For this population-based study, we plan to recruit 1000 participants aged 75, 80 or 85 years living in central Finland, by drawing personal details from the population register. Participants are interviewed on active aging, wellbeing, disability, environmental and social support, mobility, health behavior and health literacy. Physical activity and heart rate are monitored for 7 days with wearable sensors. Functional tests include hearing, vision, muscle strength, reaction time, exercise tolerance, mobility, and cognitive performance. Clinical examination by a nurse and physician includes an electrocardiogram, tests of blood pressure, orthostatic regulation, arterial stiffness, and lung function, as well as a review of chronic and acute conditions and prescribed medications. C-reactive protein, small blood count, cholesterol and vitamin D are analyzed from blood samples. Associations of factors potentially underlying active aging and wellbeing will be studied using multivariate methods. Cohort effects will be studied by comparing test results of physical and cognitive functioning with results of a cohort examined in 1989-90.
The current study will renew research on positive gerontology through the novel approach to active aging and by suggesting new biomarkers of resilience and active aging. Therefore, high interdisciplinary impact is expected. This cross-sectional study will not provide knowledge on temporal order of events or causality, but an innovative cross-sectional dataset provides opportunities for emergence of novel creative hypotheses and theories.
PubMed ID
29716566 View in PubMed
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Association of Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference With Physical Functioning: The Vitality 90+ Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265788
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 Jul;70(7):885-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Inna Lisko
Sari Stenholm
Jani Raitanen
Mikko Hurme
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Kristina Tiainen
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 Jul;70(7):885-91
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise Tolerance - physiology
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - physiopathology
Residence Characteristics
Self Report
Thinness - complications - physiopathology
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Both obesity and underweight are associated with impaired physical functioning, but related information on the oldest old population is scarce. Our purpose was to examine whether body mass index, waist circumference (WC), and their combination are associated with physical performance and activities of daily living (ADL) disability in 90-year-old women and men.
Data are from the Vitality 90+ Study, which is a population-based study of persons with age =90 years living in the area of Tampere, Finland. Altogether 416 women and 153 men, aged 90-91 years, provided data on body mass index, WC, chair stand, and Barthel Index. Comorbidity, physical exercise, smoking history, living residence, and sample year were used as covariates in multinomial logistic and logistic regression models.
Women in the highest WC tertile had lower physical performance and were more likely unable to perform the chair stand than women in the lowest WC tertile. Women in the highest WC tertile were also more likely to have ADL disability, compared to the lowest WC tertile. In women, overweight and obesity were associated with ADL disability, but not when WC was included in the model. Men with body mass index =25 kg/m(2) and WC
PubMed ID
25394617 View in PubMed
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Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference as Predictors of Disability in Nonagenarians: The Vitality 90+ Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286877
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Oct 12;72(11):1569-1574
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-12-2017
Author
Inna Lisko
Kristina Tiainen
Jani Raitanen
Juulia Jylhävä
Mikko Hurme
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Sari Stenholm
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Oct 12;72(11):1569-1574
Date
Oct-12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Only scarce data exist on the association between obesity and disability in the oldest old. The purpose of this prospective study is to examine if body mass index and waist circumference (WC) are associated with incident mobility and activities of daily living (ADL) disability in nonagenarians.
We used longitudinal data from the Vitality 90+ Study, which is a population-based study conducted at the area of Tampere, Finland. Altogether 291 women and 134 men, aged 90-91 years, had measured data on body mass index and/or WC and did not have self-reported mobility or ADL disability at baseline. Incident mobility and ADL disability was followed-up on median 3.6 years (range 0.6-7.8 years). Mortality was also followed-up. Multinomial logistic regression models were used for the analyses, as death was treated as an alternative outcome. The follow-up time was taken into account in the analyses.
Neither low or high body mass index, nor low or high WC, were associated with incident mobility disability. In women, the lowest WC tertile (
PubMed ID
28329171 View in PubMed
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Body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio as predictors of mortality in nonagenarians: the Vitality 90+ Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131940
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2011 Nov;66(11):1244-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Inna Lisko
Kristina Tiainen
Sari Stenholm
Tiina Luukkaala
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland. inna.lisko@uta.fi
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2011 Nov;66(11):1244-50
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Body Composition
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Size - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Male
Nutritional Status
Obesity - mortality
Obesity, Abdominal - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The associations of body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity with mortality among very old people are poorly known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of BMI, waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio with mortality in nonagenarians.
This study is part of a prospective population-based study, Vitality 90+, including both community-dwelling and institutionalized persons from Tampere, Finland. Altogether 192 women and 65 men aged 90 years were subjected to anthropometric measurements, a baseline interview, and a 4-year mortality follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models were used in the statistical analyses.
In men, normal weight indicated a three times higher mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR] 3.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-7.06) compared with overweight, and WC was inversely associated with mortality (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-1.00) after adjustment for covariates. In women, the univariate waist-to-hip ratio (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.06-1.92) and BMI-adjusted waist-to-hip ratio (HR 1.45, 95% CI 1.07-1.97) were positively associated with mortality. Also, overweight women whose WC was
PubMed ID
21860016 View in PubMed
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Inflammation, adiposity, and mortality in the oldest old.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120475
Source
Rejuvenation Res. 2012 Oct;15(5):445-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Inna Lisko
Kristina Tiainen
Sari Stenholm
Tiina Luukkaala
Mikko Hurme
Terho Lehtimäki
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland. inna.lisko@uta.fi
Source
Rejuvenation Res. 2012 Oct;15(5):445-52
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - metabolism
Adiposity
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Body Composition
Body mass index
Female
Finland
Humans
Inflammation - metabolism
Linear Models
Male
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Increased proinflammatory status is associated with both increased adiposity and higher mortality risk. Thus, it is paradoxical that mild obesity does not predict increased mortality in older adults. We investigated the association of inflammatory markers with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) in nonagenarians, and the combined effects of BMI, WC, WHR, and inflammatory status on mortality.
This study was based on a prospective population-based study, Vitality 90+, carried out in Tampere, Finland. Altogether, 157 women and 53 men aged 90 years were subjected to anthropometric measurements, blood samples, and a 4-year mortality follow-up. Inflammatory status was based on sex-specific median levels of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a).
In the unadjusted linear regression analyses, IL-1RA, CRP, and TNF-a were positively associated with BMI and WC in women, whereas in men IL-1RA was positively associated with BMI and IL-6 positively with WC. In the models adjusted for diseases, functional status, and smoking, IL-1RA and CRP were positively associated with BMI and WC in women. Low WC and WHR combined with low inflammation protected from mortality in women and high BMI and WC regardless of inflammation protected from mortality in men in the adjusted Cox regression analysis.
In the oldest old, the effect of adiposity in combination with inflammatory status on mortality differs between men and women. More research is needed to disentangle the role of adiposity among the oldest old.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22998329 View in PubMed
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