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Design of the FINS-TEENS study: A randomized controlled trial assessing the impact of fatty fish on cognitive performance in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285193
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Aug;45(6):621-629
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Siv Skotheim
Lisbeth Dahl
Katina Handeland
Livar Frøyland
Øyvind Lie
Jannike Øyen
Marian Kjellevold
Kjell Morten Stormark
Ingvild Eide Graff
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Aug;45(6):621-629
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Cognition - physiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Food Services
Humans
Lunch
Male
Norway
Research Design
Schools
Abstract
To describe the rationale, study design, population and dietary compliance in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) investigating the effect of fatty fish on cognitive performance and mental health in adolescents.
In the Fish Intervention Studies-TEENS (FINS-TEENS) study we individually randomized 478 adolescents (14-15-year-olds) from eight secondary schools in Norway to receive school meal lunches with fatty fish or meat or n-3 supplements three times a week for 12 weeks. Demographic factors, psychological tests and biological measures were collected pre-and post-intervention. Duplicate portions of lunch meals were collected and individual intake recorded throughout the study.
In total, 481 out of 785 adolescents (61%) agreed to participate and 34 (7%) dropped out. Breakfast consumption was the only group difference in background characteristics. Analyses of selected nutrients in the lunch meals showed higher levels of n-3 fatty acids, vitamin D and n-6 fatty acids in the fish compared to the meat meals. Dietary compliance (score 0-144) revealed that the intake in the Fish group (mean = 59, standard deviation (SD) = 35) were lower than in the Meat group (mean = 83, SD = 31, p
PubMed ID
28691640 View in PubMed
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A Diet Score Assessing Norwegian Adolescents' Adherence to Dietary Recommendations-Development and Test-Retest Reproducibility of the Score.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281361
Source
Nutrients. 2016 Jul 29;8(8)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-29-2016
Author
Katina Handeland
Marian Kjellevold
Maria Wik Markhus
Ingvild Eide Graff
Livar Frøyland
Ã?yvind Lie
Siv Skotheim
Kjell Morten Stormark
Lisbeth Dahl
Jannike Ã?yen
Source
Nutrients. 2016 Jul 29;8(8)
Date
Jul-29-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - ethnology
Caregivers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Female
Healthy Diet
Humans
Internet
Lost to Follow-Up
Male
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Observation
Parents
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Self Report
Abstract
Assessment of adolescents' dietary habits is challenging. Reliable instruments to monitor dietary trends are required to promote healthier behaviours in this group. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess adolescents' adherence to Norwegian dietary recommendations with a diet score and to report results from, and test-retest reliability of, the score. The diet score involved seven food groups and one physical activity indicator, and was applied to answers from a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) administered twice. Reproducibility of the score was assessed with Cohen's Kappa (? statistics) at an interval of three months. The setting was eight lower-secondary schools in Hordaland County, Norway, and subjects were adolescents (n = 472) aged 14-15 years and their caregivers. Results showed that the proportion of adolescents consistently classified by the diet score was 87.6% (? = 0.465). For food groups, proportions ranged from 74.0% to 91.6% (? = 0.249 to ? = 0.573). Less than 40% of the participants were found to adhere to recommendations for frequencies of eating fruits, vegetables, added sugar, and fish. Highest compliance to recommendations was seen for choosing water as beverage and limit the intake of red meat. The score was associated with parental socioeconomic status. The diet score was found to be reproducible at an acceptable level. Health promoting work targeting adolescents should emphasize to increase the intake of recommended foods to approach nutritional guidelines.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27483312 View in PubMed
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Fatty fish, hair mercury and cognitive function in Norwegian preschool children: Results from the randomized controlled trial FINS-KIDS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299133
Source
Environ Int. 2018 12; 121(Pt 2):1098-1105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Ingrid Kvestad
Silje Vabø
Marian Kjellevold
Ole Jakob Nøstbakken
Lisa Kolden Midtbø
Mari Hysing
Maria Wik Markhus
Lise Madsen
Katina Handeland
Ingvild Eide Graff
Øyvind Lie
Livar Frøyland
Kjell Morten Stormark
Lisbeth Dahl
Jannike Øyen
Author Affiliation
Regional Center for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, NORCE Norwegian Research Center, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Environ Int. 2018 12; 121(Pt 2):1098-1105
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition - drug effects
Diet
Fishes
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Meat
Mercury - analysis - toxicity
Norway
Abstract
The toxic effects of prenatal methylmercury (MeHg) include neurological abnormalities and developmental delay of which infants and children are particular susceptible. Studies on the effects of low and moderate exposure show conflicting results. Seafood is the main dietary source of MeHg, but also contributes with nutrients regarded as beneficial for development.
To measure the change in total hair mercury concentration (THHg) after an intervention of lunch meals with fatty fish or meat in Norwegian preschool children, and to examine the associations between THHg and cognitive function.
Children (n?=?232) 4-6?years old were randomized to lunch meals with fatty fish (n?=?114) or meat (n?=?118) three times a week for 16?weeks. THHg was determined using a Direct Mercury Analyzer, and cognitive function was assessed by the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Intelligence Scale-III (WPPSI-III) pre- and post-intervention. Linear mixed effect models were used to analyze changes in THHg and WPPSI-III scores.
The mean (SD) THHg pre-intervention was 0.373 (0.204) mg?kg-1. Children in the fish group had an increase in THHg (change 0.162, 95% CI 0.111, 0.213?mg?kg-1), whereas children in the meat group had decreased THHg (-0.053, 95% CI -0.103, -0.002?mg?kg-1). There were no notable associations between THHg and the WPPSI-III raw scores at baseline or after 16?weeks of the fish/meat intervention.
Lunch meals including fatty fish led to a significant increase in THHg, but the values remain below the point of departures used for risk assessment by the EFSA, WHO and US-EPA. We observed no associations between THHg and cognitive function.
PubMed ID
30360881 View in PubMed
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Fatty Fish Intake and the Effect on Mental Health and Sleep in Preschool Children in FINS-KIDS, a Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297700
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Oct 11; 10(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Oct-11-2018
Author
Mari Hysing
Ingrid Kvestad
Marian Kjellevold
Lisa Kolden Midtbø
Ingvild Eide Graff
Øyvind Lie
Hallvard Hurum
Kjell Morten Stormark
Jannike Øyen
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health, NORCE Norwegian Research Centre, 5008 Bergen, Norway. mari.hysing@norceresearch.no.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Oct 11; 10(10):
Date
Oct-11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Animals
Child, Preschool
Diet - methods
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - analysis
Eating - psychology
Female
Fishes
Humans
Lunch
Male
Meat - analysis
Mental Processes
Norway
Schools
Seafood - analysis
Sleep
Abstract
Mental health and sleep problems are prevalent in children during preschool years. The aim of the current study was to investigate if increased intake of fatty fish compared with meat improves mental health and sleep in four- to six-year-old children. The children (n = 232) in the two-armed randomized controlled trial, Fish Intervention Studies-KIDS (FINS-KIDS), were randomly assigned to lunch meals with fatty fish (herring/mackerel) or meat (chicken/lamb/beef) three times a week for 16 weeks. The fish and meat were weighed before and after the meals to record the exact consumption in grams (dietary compliance). Mental health problems were assessed by the strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ) and sleep by parent report pre- and post-intervention. There was no significant statistical difference between changes in mental health and sleep for the fish eating group compared with the meat eating group, neither in the crude analysis nor after adjusting for intake of fish or meat (dietary compliance).
PubMed ID
30314281 View in PubMed
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Iodine status in Norwegian preschool children and associations with dietary iodine sources: the FINS-KIDS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310735
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2019 Sep; 58(6):2219-2227
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2019
Author
Ive Nerhus
Mathilde Odland
Marian Kjellevold
Lisa Kolden Midtbø
Maria Wik Markhus
Ingvild Eide Graff
Øyvind Lie
Ingrid Kvestad
Livar Frøyland
Lisbeth Dahl
Jannike Øyen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Marine Research (IMR), Nordnes, P.O. Box 1870, 5817, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2019 Sep; 58(6):2219-2227
Date
Sep-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - methods
Female
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - urine
Male
Norway
Nutrition Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Nutritional Status
Abstract
Iodine is an essential trace element necessary for thyroid hormone synthesis. Iodine deficiency is a continuing public health problem despite international efforts to eliminate it. Studies on iodine status in preschoolers are scarce. Thus, the aims of the current study were to determine the iodine status and to investigate possible associations between urinary iodine concentration (UIC) and estimated 24 h iodine extraction (UIE) and iodine-rich foods.
Data are cross-sectional baseline data, obtained from the two-armed randomized controlled dietary trial "Fish Intervention Studies-KIDS" (FINS-KIDS) conducted in Bergen, Norway. UIC was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in spot urine samples. Inadequate UIC was defined as median?
PubMed ID
29974227 View in PubMed
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Levels of non-essential elements in muscle from harp seal (Phagophilus groenlandicus) and hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) caught in the Greenland Sea area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61439
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Dec 16;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-2005
Author
Linn Anne Brunborg
Ingvild Eide Graff
Livar Frøyland
KÃ¥re Julshamn
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), P.O. Box 2029 Nordnes, N-5817 Bergen, Norway.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Dec 16;
Date
Dec-16-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The non-essential elements, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead, inevitably accumulate in marine top predators such as seals. The concentration of these elements and the essential element selenium, due to its proposed protective properties against mercury toxicity in marine mammals, were measured in muscle, liver and kidney from reproductive active females of harp seal (Phagophilus groenlandicus) and hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) caught in the drift ice between Iceland and East Greenland. Arsenic levels were below 1 mug/g w.w. in all analysed samples, and were therefore low compared to other seafood products. The concentrations of arsenic found in the present study were comparable to the results reported in a similar study from 1985. Mean concentrations of total mercury in muscle from the present study were higher than levels in other seafood products. The levels of total mercury from the present study showed a tendency of lower levels in all tissue samples compared to the study from 1985. Methyl mercury displayed a trend of a lower ratio of methyl mercury to total mercury as the concentration of total mercury increased, indicating a demethylation of methyl mercury at high total mercury concentrations (e.g. mercury in liver of hooded seal). The concentration ratio of methyl mercury to total mercury in muscle samples was more than 75%, with total mercury concentration less than 0.5 mug/g w.w., whereas the ratio for liver was as low as 0.2% with a total mercury concentration of 128 mug/g w.w. The molar concentration ratios of selenium to mercury showed that selenium was present in a molar surplus to mercury in all tissues with low mercury concentration. However, there seemed to be a general mobilisation of selenium in liver and kidney tissues of harp seal and hooded seal, whereas an extraordinary mobilisation seemed to take place at hepatic mercury concentrations exceeding 50 mug/g w.w. The mean concentrations of lead in muscles in the present study were higher than in fish and other seafood products from the Barents Sea. The lead concentrations from the present study were lower than levels reported in the 1985 study. However, the levels of the non-essential elements analysed in muscle from the two seal species in the present study should not prevent the use of seal meat in human nutrition.
PubMed ID
16368127 View in PubMed
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Lower levels of Persistent Organic Pollutants, metals and the marine omega 3-fatty acid DHA in farmed compared to wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282426
Source
Environ Res. 2017 May;155:49-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Anne-Katrine Lundebye
Erik-Jan Lock
Josef D Rasinger
Ole Jakob Nøstbakken
Rita Hannisdal
Egil Karlsbakk
Vidar Wennevik
Abdullah S Madhun
Lise Madsen
Ingvild Eide Graff
Robin Ørnsrud
Source
Environ Res. 2017 May;155:49-59
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed
Animals
Aquaculture
Arsenic - analysis
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - analysis
Fatty Acids, Omega-6 - analysis
Food contamination - analysis
Food Safety
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Metals - analysis
Norway
Pesticides - analysis
Salmo salar
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Contaminants and fatty acid levels in farmed- versus wild Atlantic salmon have been a hot topic of debate in terms of food safety. The present study determined dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), metals and fatty acids in wild and farmed Atlantic salmon. Contaminant levels of dioxins, PCBs, OCPs (DDT, dieldrin, lindane, chlordane, Mirex, and toxaphene), and mercury were higher in wild salmon than in farmed salmon, as were the concentrations of the essential elements selenium, copper, zinc and iron, and the marine omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). PBDE, endosulfan, pentachlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene, cadmium and lead levels were low and comparable in both wild and farmed fish, and there was no significant difference in the marine omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) concentration. The total fat content was significantly higher in farmed than wild salmon due to a higher content of both saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, as well as a higher content of omega-6 fatty acids. The omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acid ratio was considerably lower in farmed than wild salmon due to the high level of omega-6 fatty acids. Contaminant concentrations in Atlantic salmon were well below maximum levels applicable in the European Union. Atlantic salmon, both farmed and wild, is a good source of EPA and DHA with a 200g portion per week contributing 3.2g or 2.8g respectively, being almost twice the intake considered adequate for adults by the European Food Safety Authority (i.e. 250mg/day or 1.75g/week).
PubMed ID
28189073 View in PubMed
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Low omega-3 index in pregnancy is a possible biological risk factor for postpartum depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108778
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e67617
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Maria Wik Markhus
Siv Skotheim
Ingvild Eide Graff
Livar Frøyland
Hanne Cecilie Braarud
Kjell Morten Stormark
Marian Kjellevold Malde
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, NIFES, Bergen, Norway. maria.wik.markhus@nifes.no
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e67617
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Docosahexaenoic Acids - metabolism
Erythrocytes - metabolism
Fatty Acids - blood
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Seafood
Abstract
Depression is a common disorder affecting 10-15% women in the postpartum period. Postpartum depression can disrupt early mother-infant interaction, and constitutes a risk factor for early child development. Recently, attention has been drawn to the hypothesis that a low intake of seafood in pregnancy can be a risk factor for postpartum depression. Seafood is a unique dietary source of the marine omega-3 fatty acids and is a natural part of a healthy balanced diet that is especially important during pregnancy.
In a community based prospective cohort in a municipality in Western Norway, we investigated both nutritional and psychological risk factors for postpartum depression. The source population was all women who were pregnant within the period November 2009 - June 2011. The fatty acid status in red blood cells was assessed in the 28(th) gestation week and participants were screened for postpartum depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) three months after delivery. The aim of the present study was to investigate if a low omega-3 index in pregnancy is a possible risk factor for postpartum depression.
In a simple regression model, the omega-3 index was associated with the EPDS score in a nonlinear inverse manner with an R square of 19. Thus, the low omega-3 index explained 19% of the variance in the EPDS score. The DPA content, DHA content, omega-3 index, omega-3/omega-6 ratio, total HUFA score, and the omega-3 HUFA score were all inversely correlated with the EPDS score. The EPDS scores of participants in the lowest omega-3 index quartile were significantly different to the three other omega-3 index quartiles.
In this study population, a low omega-3 index in late pregnancy was associated with higher depression score three months postpartum.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23844041 View in PubMed
Less detail

Maternal DHA Status during Pregnancy Has a Positive Impact on Infant Problem Solving: A Norwegian Prospective Observation Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295142
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Apr 24; 10(5):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Apr-24-2018
Author
Hanne Cecilie Braarud
Maria Wik Markhus
Siv Skotheim
Kjell Morten Stormark
Livar Frøyland
Ingvild Eide Graff
Marian Kjellevold
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health, Uni Research Health, Uni Research, P.O. Box 7810, 5020 Bergen, Norway. hannec.braarud@bufetat.no.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Apr 24; 10(5):
Date
Apr-24-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Age Factors
Biomarkers - blood
Child Development
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Erythrocytes - metabolism
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Problem Solving
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6, n-3) is a long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid necessary for normal brain growth and cognitive development. Seafood and dietary supplements are the primary dietary sources of DHA. This study addresses the associations between DHA status in pregnant women and healthy, term-born infant problem-solving skills assessed using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire. The fatty acid status of maternal red blood cells (RBCs) was assessed in the 28th week of gestation and at three months postpartum. The infants’ fatty acid status (RBC) was assessed at three, six, and twelve months, and problem-solving skills were assessed at six and twelve months. Maternal DHA status in pregnancy was found to be positively associated with infants’ problem-solving skills at 12 months. This association remained significant even after controlling for the level of maternal education, a surrogate for socio-economic status. The infants’ DHA status at three months was associated with the infants’ problem solving at 12 months. The results accentuate the importance for pregnant and lactating women to have a satisfactory DHA status from dietary intake of seafood or other sources rich in DHA.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29695097 View in PubMed
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Vitamin D status in preschool children and its relations to vitamin D sources and body mass index-Fish Intervention Studies-KIDS (FINS-KIDS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308129
Source
Nutrition. 2020 02; 70:110595
Publication Type
Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Date
02-2020
Author
Lisa K Midtbø
Lena B Nygaard
Maria Wik Markhus
Marian Kjellevold
Øyvind Lie
Lisbeth Dahl
Ingrid Kvestad
Livar Frøyland
Ingvild Eide Graff
Jannike Øyen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Nutrition. 2020 02; 70:110595
Date
02-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Calcifediol - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Pediatric Obesity - blood - complications
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Seasons
Sunlight
Vitamin D - analysis
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The aims of this study were to determine vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [s-25(OH)D3]) and examine possible associations between vitamin D status and vitamin D-rich dietary sources, sun exposure, and body mass index in preschool children ages 4 to 6 y.
This is a cross-sectional study based on baseline data (collected in January-February 2015) from the two-armed randomized controlled trial Fish Intervention Studies-KIDS (FINS-KIDS) conducted in Bergen, Norway. S-25(OH)D3 concentration was determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Information regarding habitual dietary intake, recent sun vacations, and body mass index were assessed with questionnaires answered by the children's caregivers.
The children (n?=?212) had a mean (standard deviation) s-25(OH)D3 of 60.7 (13.8) nmol/L; 18.9% had s-25(OH)D3 =50 nmol/L. In logistic regression models, non-overweight versus overweight status was inversely associated with s-25(OH)D3 =50 nmol/L (odds ratio: 0.41; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.95; P?=?0.037). Non-sun versus sun vacations were associated with s-25(OH)D3 =75 nmol/L (odds ratio: 5.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.93-14.77; P?=?0.001).
The majority of the preschool children (81%) had s-25(OH)D3 >50 nmol/L. Children with overweight status had an increased risk of s-25(OH)D3 =50 nmol/L, and children who had not been on sun vacations were at a greater risk of s-25(OH)D3 =75 nmol/L.
PubMed ID
31739173 View in PubMed
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