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Health status and functional profile at admission of nursing home residents in Iceland over 11-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101358
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2011 Aug 1;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2011
Author
Ingibjörg Hjaltadóttir
Ingalill R Hallberg
Anna K Ekwall
Per Nyberg
Author Affiliation
Doctoral Student, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden and Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland and The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Professor, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden and The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden Lecturer, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Senior Lecturer, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2011 Aug 1;
Date
Aug-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
hjaltadóttir i., hallberg i.r., ekwall a.k. & nyberg p. (2011) Health status and functional profile at admission of nursing home residents in Iceland over 11-year period. International Journal of Older People Nursing doi: 10.1111/j.1748-3743.2011.00287.x Background. The knowledge over time of the health status and changes in care needs of newly admitted nursing home residents is limited. Objectives. To investigate trends in residents' health status and functional profile at admission to nursing homes and compare rural and capital areas in Iceland over an 11-year period. Design. Retrospective analysis of nursing home data over 11 years (1996-2006). Participants. Residents, who had been assessed with the Minimum Data Set assessment within 90 days from admittance (n = 2206). Method. Non-parametric tests for descriptive statistics and linear regressions were used to analyse time trends. Results. The mean age ranged from 80.1 to 82.8, and women accounted for 52.7% to 67.1%. The level of independency indicated intact cognitive performance in 28.6-61.4% and in 42.5-68% in activities of daily living performance. A weak, but significant, linear trend was seen in residents' health becoming less stable, their cognitive performance improving, more pain being reported and greater participation in social activities over the 11 years. Conclusion. Some residents might have stayed at home longer had they been given appropriate home care and the opportunity of rehabilitation. Pain management and social activities are areas where more staff knowledge seems to be needed. Implications for practice. Resources to enable old people to remain at home need to be explored before their entry into nursing homes. Whereas providing services at the appropriate level is important for society as well as older people.
PubMed ID
21801320 View in PubMed
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Quality of care in Icelandic nursing homes measured with Minimum Data Set quality indicators: retrospective analysis of nursing home data over 7 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122954
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2012 Nov;49(11):1342-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Ingibjörg Hjaltadóttir
Anna Kristensson Ekwall
Per Nyberg
Ingalill Rahm Hallberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. ingihj@landspitali.is
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2012 Nov;49(11):1342-53
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Nursing Homes - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The increasing need for long-term care as well as diminished financial resources may compromise the quality of care of older people. Thus the need for clinically based quality of care monitoring to guide development of long-term services has been pointed out.
The aim of this study was to investigate trends in quality of care during 2003-2009 as reflected in the Minimum Data Set quality indicator outcome in Icelandic nursing homes and to investigate the association of Minimum Data Set quality indicators with residents' health status (health stability, pain, depression and cognitive performance) and functional profile (activities of daily living and social engagement).
Retrospective analysis of nursing home data over 7 years.
The sample used for analysis was 11,034 Minimum Data Set assessments of 3694 residents living in Icelandic nursing homes in 2003-2009. Minimum Data Set quality indicators were used to measure quality of care. The chi-square test for trend and multivariate logistic regression were used to analyse the data.
The mean age of residents during the period of the study ranged from 82.3 (SD 9.1) to 85.1 (SD 8.3) and women accounted for from 65.2% to 67.8%. Findings for 16 out of 20 quality indicators indicated a decline in quality of care (p
PubMed ID
22749461 View in PubMed
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Symptoms and functional status of palliative care patients in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265375
Source
Br J Nurs. 2015 May 14-27;24(9):478-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bryndis Gestsdottir
Ingibjorg Hjaltadottir
Gudrun Dora Gudmannsdottir
Palmi V Jonsson
Sigridur Gunnarsdottir
Valgerdur Sigurðardottir
Source
Br J Nurs. 2015 May 14-27;24(9):478-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Iceland
Longitudinal Studies
Palliative Care
Abstract
Palliative care patients experience many debilitating symptoms and functional loss, but few longitudinal studies on the subject are available.
To assess the symptoms and functional status of patients admitted to specialised palliative care, to investigate whether changes occur over the admission period, and to establish whether symptoms and physical and cognitive function differ, based on the service setting. In addition, to participate in the development of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument (interRAI PC).
A prospective longitudinal study (N=123) was conducted at three time points: at admission to specialised palliative care, 14 days post-admission, and at discharge or death. The interRAI PC version 8 was used for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used, together with the Friedman statistical test and Wilcoxon post-hoc test.
Patients experienced a wide spectrum of symptoms; the most frequent were fatigue, loss of appetite, pain, difficulty sleeping, insufficient nutritional intake and nausea. Some symptoms stayed relatively stable over time, but others increased, while physical and cognitive function decreased over time. The interRAI PC version 8 proved comprehensive and simple to use.
Patients experienced a significant symptom burden and functional loss from admission to discharge or death. Symptoms indicating progressive deterioration became more frequent and severe, while physical and cognitive function decreased at all levels. Overall, inpatients had more symptoms and functional decline than home-care patients. The interRAI PC version 8 proved valuable in collecting clinical information and detecting changes over time as other interRAI suite instruments.
PubMed ID
25978281 View in PubMed
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Thresholds for minimum data set quality indicators developed and applied in icelandic nursing homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127074
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2012 Jul-Sep;27(3):266-76
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ingibjörg Hjaltadóttir
Ingalill Rahm Hallberg
Anna Kristensson Ekwall
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. ingihj@landspitali.is
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2012 Jul-Sep;27(3):266-76
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Delphi Technique
Female
Geriatric Nursing
Humans
Iceland
Male
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Homes - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
A modified Delphi method was used to determine thresholds for Minimum Data Set quality indicators for Icelandic nursing homes. The thresholds were then applied to quality outcomes in Icelandic nursing homes for the year 2009. The thresholds indicate areas of good or poor care and can be used for planning services. Icelandic nursing homes seem to be doing best in incontinence and nutritional care. However, improvement is needed in care practices for depression, medication, and activity.
PubMed ID
22327334 View in PubMed
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Use of complementary therapies in nursing homes: Descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295579
Source
Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2018 Aug; 32:65-69
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Thora Jenny Gunnarsdottir
Runar Vilhjalmsson
Ingibjorg Hjaltadottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Iceland. Electronic address: thoraj@hi.is.
Source
Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2018 Aug; 32:65-69
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Iceland
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Complementary therapies may have positive effect on residents in nursing homes. The aim of this research was to investigate what kind of complementary therapies are provided in Icelandic nursing homes and who are the providers. Also whether the nursing homes need assistance to support the use of such therapies.
A questionnaire was mailed to all the nursing homes in Iceland (N?=?59). Total of forty-five nursing homes replied or 76% response rate.
Registered nurses and licenced practical did most of the planning and provision of complementary therapies. The most common therapies were: heat packs, physical exercise and massage. Managers would like to have more knowledge and support in providing complementary therapies.
The use of some complementary therapies is common in Icelandic nursing homes. More knowledge is needed to support the use of CT in Icelandic nursing homes.
PubMed ID
30057061 View in PubMed
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Use of psychiatric medication in three Arctic nursing homes: association with dementia and psychiatric symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311883
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2021 Dec; 80(1):1920252
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2021
Author
Sigurveig Gisladottir
Arun K Sigurdardottir
Ingibjörg Hjaltadottir
Author Affiliation
Fossahlid Nursing Home, Health Care Institution of Eastern Iceland.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2021 Dec; 80(1):1920252
Date
Dec-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
As more people reaches advanced age, more people experience cognitive impairment and dementia. Dementia is a degenerative disease in which behavioural and psychological symptoms frequently occur, resulting in admissions to nursing homes (NHs), where the most common treatment has been medical treatment. The aim was to compare three rural Arctic NHs in Iceland in their use of psychiatric medication, type of dementia among residents, level of cognitive impairment and selected quality indicators, as well as considering national data, for the period 2016-2018. Data from the interRAI-MDS 2.0 evaluation were used. Residents with severe cognitive impairment used more antipsychotic medications, and residents with mild and severe cognitive impairment used more antidepressants than residents with no cognitive impairment did. Diagnoses of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD) are more common in the capital area and the national average than they are in the rural NHs. This indicates need for diagnostic assessments of ADRD to be conducted in rural areas. Benchmarking is beneficial for local and national regulatory bodies to find areas for improvement. The NHs did not have a lower quality of care compared with the whole country, but areas for improvement were identified. One of the NHs has already started this process.
PubMed ID
33899700 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.