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Adherence to a Mediterranean-like Diet as a Protective Factor Against COPD: A Nested Case-Control Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310110
Source
COPD. 2019 08; 16(3-4):272-277
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2019
Author
Alexandra Fischer
Ingegerd Johansson
Anders Blomberg
Björn Sundström
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine, Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
COPD. 2019 08; 16(3-4):272-277
Date
08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
A diet rich in nutrients has been suggested to have protective effects against the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Since the traditional Mediterranean diet is high in nutrients, including antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, it is of interest to study as a protective factor against COPD. Our aim was therefore to study its associations with development of COPD using population-based prospective data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) cohort. Data on diet from 370 individuals, who later visited the Department of Medicine at the University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden, with a diagnosis of COPD, were compared to 1432 controls. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet was assessed by a modified version of the Mediterranean diet score (MDS). Cases were diagnosed with COPD 11.1 years (mean) (standard deviation [SD] 4.5 years) after first stating their dietary habits in the VIP at a mean age of 55.5 years (SD 6.6 years). Higher MDS was associated with a higher level of education and not living alone. After adjustment for co-habiting and education level, individuals with an intermediate MDS and those with the highest MDS had a lower odds of developing COPD (odds ratio [OR] 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56-0.95; OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.37-0.86, respectively). These results remained also after adjustment for smoking intensity, i.e., numbers of cigarettes smoked per day (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53-0.99; OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.35-0.97), respectively). To conclude, adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet seems to be inversely associated with the development of COPD.
PubMed ID
31405301 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to a Mediterranean-like Diet as a Protective Factor Against COPD: A Nested Case-Control Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302585
Source
COPD. 2019 Aug; 16(3-4):272-277
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2019
Author
Alexandra Fischer
Ingegerd Johansson
Anders Blomberg
Björn Sundström
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine, Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
COPD. 2019 Aug; 16(3-4):272-277
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
A diet rich in nutrients has been suggested to have protective effects against the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Since the traditional Mediterranean diet is high in nutrients, including antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, it is of interest to study as a protective factor against COPD. Our aim was therefore to study its associations with development of COPD using population-based prospective data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) cohort. Data on diet from 370 individuals, who later visited the Department of Medicine at the University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden, with a diagnosis of COPD, were compared to 1432 controls. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet was assessed by a modified version of the Mediterranean diet score (MDS). Cases were diagnosed with COPD 11.1 years (mean) (standard deviation [SD] 4.5 years) after first stating their dietary habits in the VIP at a mean age of 55.5 years (SD 6.6 years). Higher MDS was associated with a higher level of education and not living alone. After adjustment for co-habiting and education level, individuals with an intermediate MDS and those with the highest MDS had a lower odds of developing COPD (odds ratio [OR] 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56-0.95; OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.37-0.86, respectively). These results remained also after adjustment for smoking intensity, i.e., numbers of cigarettes smoked per day (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53-0.99; OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.35-0.97), respectively). To conclude, adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet seems to be inversely associated with the development of COPD.
PubMed ID
31405301 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations among 25-year trends in diet, cholesterol and BMI from 140,000 observations in men and women in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123566
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Ingegerd Johansson
Lena Maria Nilsson
Birgitta Stegmayr
Kurt Boman
Göran Hallmans
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. ingegerd.johansson@odont.umu.se
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:40
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - trends
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - adverse effects
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects
Diet, Reducing - adverse effects - trends
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Mass Media - trends
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Sex Characteristics
Sweden
Weight Gain
Abstract
In the 1970s, men in northern Sweden had among the highest prevalences of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) worldwide. An intervention program combining population- and individual-oriented activities was initiated in 1985. Concurrently, collection of information on medical risk factors, lifestyle and anthropometry started. Today, these data make up one of the largest databases in the world on diet intake in a population-based sample, both in terms of sample size and follow-up period. The study examines trends in food and nutrient intake, serum cholesterol and body mass index (BMI) from 1986 to 2010 in northern Sweden.
Cross-sectional information on self-reported food and nutrient intake and measured body weight, height, and serum cholesterol were compiled for over 140,000 observations. Trends and trend breaks over the 25-year period were evaluated for energy-providing nutrients, foods contributing to fat intake, serum cholesterol and BMI.
Reported intake of fat exhibited two significant trend breaks in both sexes: a decrease between 1986 and 1992 and an increase from 2002 (women) or 2004 (men). A reverse trend was noted for carbohydrates, whereas protein intake remained unchanged during the 25-year period. Significant trend breaks in intake of foods contributing to total fat intake were seen. Reported intake of wine increased sharply for both sexes (more so for women) and export beer increased for men. BMI increased continuously for both sexes, whereas serum cholesterol levels decreased during 1986 - 2004, remained unchanged until 2007 and then began to rise. The increase in serum cholesterol coincided with the increase in fat intake, especially with intake of saturated fat and fats for spreading on bread and cooking.
Men and women in northern Sweden decreased their reported fat intake in the first 7 years (1986-1992) of an intervention program. After 2004 fat intake increased sharply for both genders, which coincided with introduction of a positive media support for low carbohydrate-high-fat (LCHF) diet. The decrease and following increase in cholesterol levels occurred simultaneously with the time trends in food selection, whereas a constant increase in BMI remained unaltered. These changes in risk factors may have important effects on primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Notes
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PubMed ID
22686621 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bicycling to Work and Primordial Prevention of Cardiovascular Risk: A Cohort Study Among Swedish Men and Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287961
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Oct 31;5(11)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-31-2016
Author
Anders Grøntved
Robert W Koivula
Ingegerd Johansson
Patrik Wennberg
Lars Østergaard
Göran Hallmans
Frida Renström
Paul W Franks
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Oct 31;5(11)
Date
Oct-31-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bicycling
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Glucose Intolerance - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Hypertriglyceridemia - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Bicycling to work may be a viable approach for achieving physical activity that provides cardiovascular health benefits. In this study we investigated the relationship of bicycling to work with incidence of obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and impaired glucose tolerance across a decade of follow-up in middle-aged men and women.
We followed 23 732 Swedish men and women with a mean age of 43.5 years at baseline who attended a health examination twice during a 10-year period (1990-2011). In multivariable adjusted models we calculated the odds of incident obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, comparing individuals who commuted to work by bicycle with those who used passive modes of transportation. We also examined the relationship of change in commuting mode with incidence of these clinical risk factors. Cycling to work at baseline was associated with lower odds of incident obesity (odds ratio [OR]=0.85, 95% CI 0.73-0.99), hypertension (OR=0.87, 95% CI 0.79-0.95), hypertriglyceridemia (OR=0.85, 95% CI 0.76-0.94), and impaired glucose tolerance (OR=0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.96) compared with passive travel after adjusting for putative confounding factors. Participants who maintained or began bicycling to work during follow-up had lower odds of obesity (OR=0.61, 95% CI 0.50-0.73), hypertension (OR=0.89, 95% CI 0.80-0.98), hypertriglyceridemia (OR=0.80, 95% CI 0.70-0.90), and impaired glucose tolerance (OR=0.82, 95% CI 0.74-0.91) compared with participants not cycling to work at both times points or who switched from cycling to other modes of transport during follow-up.
These data suggest that commuting by bicycle to work is an important strategy for primordial prevention of clinical cardiovascular risk factors among middle-aged men and women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27799235 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biomarkers of milk fat and the risk of myocardial infarction in men and women: a prospective, matched case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96924
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jul;92(1):194-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Eva Warensjö
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Tommy Cederholm
Kurt Boman
Mats Eliasson
Göran Hallmans
Ingegerd Johansson
Per Sjögren
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. eva.warensjo@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jul;92(1):194-202
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood pressure
Cohort Studies
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - adverse effects
Models, Statistical
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Patient Selection
Phospholipids - blood - pharmacology
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: High intakes of saturated fat have been associated with cardiovascular disease, and milk fat is rich in saturated fat. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the serum milk fat biomarkers pentadecanoic acid (15:0), heptadecanoic acid (17:0), and their sum (15:0+17:0) and a first myocardial infarction (MI). DESIGN: The study design was a prospective case-control study nested within a large population-based cohort in Sweden. Included in the study were 444 cases (307 men) and 556 controls (308 men) matched on sex, age, date of examination, and geographic region. Clinical, anthropometric, biomarker fatty acid, physical activity, and dietary data were collected. The odds of a first MI were investigated by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: In women, proportions of milk fat biomarkers in plasma phospholipids were significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
20484449 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease and diabetes in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study Cohort - evaluation of risk factors and their interactions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47322
Source
Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Göran Hallmans
Asa Agren
Gerd Johansson
Anders Johansson
Birgitta Stegmayr
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Bernt Lindahl
Olle Rolandsson
Stefan Söderberg
Mats Nilsson
Ingegerd Johansson
Lars Weinehall
Author Affiliation
Nutritional Research, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. goran.hallmans@nutrires.umu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:18-24
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Humans
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is, first, to describe the organization, sampling procedures, availability of samples/database, ethical considerations, and quality control program of the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study Cohort. Secondly, some examples are given of studies on cardiovascular disease and diabetes with a focus on the biomarker programme. The cohort has been positioned as a national and international resource for scientific research.
PubMed ID
14660243 View in PubMed
Less detail

Change in lifestyle behaviors and diabetes risk: evidence from a population-based cohort study with 10 year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283465
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 Mar 29;14(1):39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-2017
Author
Adina L Feldman
Gráinne H Long
Ingegerd Johansson
Lars Weinehall
Eva Fhärm
Patrik Wennberg
Margareta Norberg
Simon J Griffin
Olov Rolandsson
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 Mar 29;14(1):39
Date
Mar-29-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Promoting positive changes in lifestyle behavior in the whole population may be a feasible and effective approach to reducing type 2 diabetes burden, but the impact of population shifts of modifiable risk factors remains unclear. Currently most of the evidence on modifiable lifestyle behavior and type 2 diabetes risk on a population level comes from studies of between-individual differences. The objective of the study was to investigate the association and potential impact on disease burden for within-individual change in lifestyle behavior and diabetes risk.
Population-based prospective cohort study of 35,680 participants aged 30-50 at baseline in 1990-2003 in Västerbotten County, Sweden (follow-up until 2013). Five self-reported modifiable lifestyle behaviors (tobacco use, physical activity, alcohol intake, dietary fiber intake and dietary fat intake) were measured at baseline and 10 year follow-up. Lifestyle behaviors were studied separately, and combined in a score. Incident diabetes was detected by oral glucose tolerance tests. Multivariate logistic regression models and population attributable fractions (PAF) were used to analyze the association between change in lifestyle behavior between baseline and 10 year follow-up, and risk of incident diabetes.
Incident diabetes was detected in 1,184 (3.3%) participants at 10 year follow-up. There was a reduced diabetes risk associated with increase in dietary fiber intake, odds ratio (OR) 0.79 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66, 0.96) for increase of at least one unit standard deviation (3.0 g/1,000 kcal) of the baseline distribution, PAF 16.0% (95% CI 4.2, 26.4%). Increase in the lifestyle behavior score was associated with reduced diabetes risk, OR 0.92 (95% CI 0.85, 0.99) per unit increase of the score.
These results support a causal link between lifestyle behavior and type 2 diabetes incidence. A small shift in lifestyle behaviors, in particular intake of dietary fiber, has the potential to reduce diabetes burden in the population and might be a suitable target for public health intervention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28351358 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in dietary carbon footprint over ten years relative to individual characteristics and food intake in the Västerbotten Intervention Programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307401
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 01 08; 10(1):20
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-08-2020
Author
Therese Hjorth
Ena Huseinovic
Elinor Hallström
Anna Strid
Ingegerd Johansson
Bernt Lindahl
Ulf Sonesson
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 01 08; 10(1):20
Date
01-08-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Carbon Footprint
Dairy Products - analysis
Diet
Eating
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meat - analysis
Middle Aged
Nutritive Value
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
The objective was to examine 10-year changes in dietary carbon footprint relative to individual characteristics and food intake in the unique longitudinal Västerbotten Intervention Programme, Sweden. Here, 14 591 women and 13 347 men had been followed over time. Food intake was assessed via multiple two study visits 1996-2016, using a 64-item food frequency questionnaire. Greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) related to food intake, expressed as kg carbon dioxide equivalents/1000?kcal and day, were estimated. Participants were classified into GHGE quintiles within sex and 10-year age group strata at both visits. Women and men changing from lowest to highest GHGE quintile exhibited highest body mass index within their quintiles at first visit, and the largest increase in intake of meat, minced meat, chicken, fish and butter and the largest decrease in intake of potatoes, rice and pasta. Women and men changing from highest to lowest GHGE quintile exhibited basically lowest rates of university degree and marriage and highest rates of smoking within their quintiles at first visit. Among these, both sexes reported the largest decrease in intake of meat, minced meat and milk, and the largest increase in intake of snacks and, for women, sweets. More research is needed on how to motivate dietary modifications to reduce climate impact and support public health.
PubMed ID
31913331 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in Dietary Fat Intake and Projections for Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in Sweden: A Simulation Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285263
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(8):e0160474
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Lena Björck
Annika Rosengren
Anna Winkvist
Simon Capewell
Martin Adiels
Piotr Bandosz
Julia Critchley
Kurt Boman
Maria Guzman-Castillo
Martin O'Flaherty
Ingegerd Johansson
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(8):e0160474
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Dietary Fats - metabolism
Fatty Acids - metabolism
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Mortality - trends
Risk factors
Smoking
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In Sweden, previous favourable trends in blood cholesterol levels have recently levelled off or even increased in some age groups since 2003, potentially reflecting changing fashions and attitudes towards dietary saturated fatty acids (SFA). We aimed to examine the potential effect of different SFA intake on future coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in 2025.
We compared the effect on future CHD mortality of two different scenarios for fat intake a) daily SFA intake decreasing to 10 energy percent (E%), and b) daily SFA intake rising to 20 E%. We assumed that there would be moderate improvements in smoking (5%), salt intake (1g/day) and physical inactivity (5% decrease) to continue recent, positive trends.
In the baseline scenario which assumed that recent mortality declines continue, approximately 5,975 CHD deaths might occur in year 2025. Anticipated improvements in smoking, dietary salt intake and physical activity, would result in some 380 (-6.4%) fewer deaths (235 in men and 145 in women). In combination with a mean SFA daily intake of 10 E%, a total of 810 (-14%) fewer deaths would occur in 2025 (535 in men and 275 in women). If the overall consumption of SFA rose to 20 E%, the expected mortality decline would be wiped out and approximately 20 (0.3%) additional deaths might occur.
CHD mortality may increase as a result of unfavourable trends in diets rich in saturated fats resulting in increases in blood cholesterol levels. These could cancel out the favourable trends in salt intake, smoking and physical activity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27490257 View in PubMed
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Climate impact from diet in relation to background and sociodemographic characteristics in the Västerbotten Intervention Programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308816
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2019 12; 22(17):3288-3297
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2019
Author
Anna Strid
Elinor Hallström
Therese Hjorth
Ingegerd Johansson
Bernt Lindahl
Ulf Sonesson
Anna Winkvist
Ena Huseinovic
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2019 12; 22(17):3288-3297
Date
12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Climate
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Greenhouse Effect - statistics & numerical data
Greenhouse Gases - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine climate impact from diet across background and sociodemographic characteristics in a population-based cohort in northern Sweden.
A cross-sectional study within the Västerbotten Intervention Programme. Dietary data from a 64-item food frequency questionnaire collected during 1996-2016 were used. Energy-adjusted greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) for all participants, expressed as kg carbon dioxide equivalents/day and 4184 kJ (1000 kcal), were estimated using data from life cycle analyses. Differences in background and sociodemographic characteristics were examined between participants with low and high GHGE from diet, respectively. The variables evaluated were age, BMI, physical activity, marital status, level of education, smoking, and residence.
Västerbotten county in northern Sweden.
In total, 46 893 women and 45 766 men aged 29-65 years.
Differences in GHGE from diet were found across the majority of examined variables. The strongest associations were found between GHGE from diet and age, BMI, education, and residence (all P
PubMed ID
31566152 View in PubMed
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