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Evaluating leisure activities in the oldest old.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169779
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2006 Mar;13(1):31-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Ingeborg Nilsson
Anne G Fisher
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy, Umeå University, Sweden. Ingeborg.Nilsson@occupther.umu.se
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2006 Mar;13(1):31-7
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Leisure Activities
Psychometrics - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
To determine whether the Modified NPS Interest Checklist (MNPS) could be developed as a tool with linear measures of four dimensions of leisure: Interest, Performance, Motivation, and Well-being.
A cross-sectional descriptive study including 156 volunteers born between 1904 and 1917 and living in urban or rural northern Sweden. Each participant was individually interviewed at her/his place of residence. Subsequent data were subjected to a series of Rasch analyses using FACETS.
The items and persons demonstrated acceptable goodness-of-fit across all four dimensions in the MNPS checklist. The Rasch equivalent of Cronbach's alpha was 0.98 for items, and ranged from 0.66 to 0.75 for persons.
The MNPS shows evidence for acceptable internal scale validity, person response validity, and scale reliability. This study provides initial evidence that the MNPS is a valid tool for measuring leisure among the oldest old. While this study provides the first psychometric examination of an assessment designed to evaluate different dimensions of leisure, more research is needed to further assess validity and reliability of this tool with the elderly and with other groups.
PubMed ID
16615413 View in PubMed
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Measuring perceived meaningfulness in day centres for persons with mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139950
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2011 Dec;18(4):312-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Ingeborg Nilsson
Elisabeth Argentzell
Mikael Sandlund
Christel Leufstadius
Mona Eklund
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation and Ageing and Living Conditions Programme, Umeå University, Sweden. ingeborg.nilsson@umu.se
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2011 Dec;18(4):312-20
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Day Care
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
As support in leading a meaningful and active life, a person with mental illness is often given the opportunity to attend a day centre. However, few studies have investigated the meaningfulness perceived by the person visiting a day centre. For such a purpose, a self-report instrument was developed.
To explore whether perceived meaningfulness, as expressed in the recently developed instrument Evaluation of Perceived Meaning in Day Centers (EPM-DC), could be viewed as one dimension and also to investigate the psychometric properties of this instrument.
Persons with mental illness attending five day centres in Sweden participated and completed the questionnaire. The data were analysed by Rasch analysis.
The study showed that the concept captured in the instrument could be viewed as unidimensional and the result gave preliminary evidence for sound psychometric properties.
The results indicate promising signs of validity and reliability, but the suitability of self-reporting may be questioned.
PubMed ID
20961265 View in PubMed
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Occupational justice-bridging theory and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97968
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2010;17(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ingeborg Nilsson
Elizabeth Townsend
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy, and Center for Population studies/Ageing and Living Condition Programme, Umeå University, Sweden. ingeborg.nilsson@umu.se
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2010;17(1):57-63
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Occupational therapy
Prejudice
Social Justice
Abstract
The evolving theory of occupational justice links the concept to social justice and to concerns for a justice of difference: a justice that recognizes occupational rights to inclusive participation in everyday occupations for all persons in society, regardless of age, ability, gender, social class, or other differences. The purpose of this descriptive paper is to inspire and empower health professionals to build a theoretical bridge to practice with an occupational justice lens. Using illustrations from a study of leisure and the use of everyday technology in the lives of very old people in Northern Sweden, the authors argue that an occupational justice lens may inspire and empower health professionals to engage in critical dialogue on occupational justice; use global thinking about occupation, health, justice, and the environment; and combine population and individualized approaches. The authors propose that taking these initiatives to bridge theory and practice will energize health professionals to enable inclusive participation in everyday occupations in diverse contexts.
PubMed ID
20170412 View in PubMed
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Perpetuating harms from isolation among older adults with cognitive impairment: observed discrepancies in homecare service documentation, assessment and approval practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297372
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 Oct 20; 18(1):800
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-20-2018
Author
Ingeborg Nilsson
Mark Luborsky
Lena Rosenberg
Linda Sandberg
Anne-Marie Boström
Lena Borell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy, Umeå University, Vårdvetarhuset, SE-901 87, Umeå, Sweden. ingeborg.nilsson@umu.se.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 Oct 20; 18(1):800
Date
Oct-20-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognitive Dysfunction - psychology
Documentation - standards
Female
Goals
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Needs Assessment
Social Isolation - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Older persons with cognitive impairment (CI) risk social isolation. Strong evidence shows that perceived loneliness, or inadequate social networks, triggers and increases health problems. How homecare systems address social participation remains unknown; anecdotal data suggests there are significant gaps. This study's objective was to identify and describe how the assessors of homecare needs document social participation among persons with CI and how their documentation corresponds with the services actually provided to meet social needs. The research questions were: How and what kinds of social participation needs are documented on need assessment forms? What types of homecare services (with a social focus) are documented and approved? How are specified needs in social participation profiles addressed by a homecare service?
Descriptive data from need assessment forms and their attached care plans for all applicants aged 65+ were collected during a 2 month period from a large homecare agency serving a municipality in Sweden. Persons with documented CI (n =?43) in the group were identified. Qualitative data analysis was conducted to examine the research questions.
Social participation factors were not documented consistently. The relationship between recognition of limitations to social participation and approval of service eligibility was not consistent. Social participation was designated by references to social status, sometimes by social network size, and occasionally by limitations to social participation. The range of approved homecare services (with social focus) covered services such as day care center visits or companionship. Three profiles of social participation were identified: clients with, (a) no participation limitations; (b) potential limitations; and (c) marked limitations.
Given the known health harms from social isolation and the high risk of isolation among older persons with CI, this novel study's documentation of inadequate and inconsistent information in homecare social need assessments and services is sobering. The findings suggest a pressing need for initiatives to formulate best practices and standards to ensure alignment of care service systems to the health needs of the growing group of aging individuals with CI.
PubMed ID
30342514 View in PubMed
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