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Do weather changes influence physical activity level among older adults? - The Generation 100 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297393
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(7):e0199463
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Nils Petter Aspvik
Hallgeir Viken
Jan Erik Ingebrigtsen
Nina Zisko
Ingar Mehus
Ulrik Wisløff
Dorthe Stensvold
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Political Science, Faculty of Social and Educational Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(7):e0199463
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Exercise
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Norway
Public Health Surveillance
Seasons
Temperature
Weather
Abstract
Understanding how individual and environmental factors impact physical activity (PA) level is important when building strategies to improve PA of older adults. No studies have examined how hour-to-hour weather changes influence PA in older adults or how the association between weather and PA eventually is related to cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) measured as peak oxygen uptake. The aim of this study was therefore to examine how hour-to-hour changes in weather effects hour-to-hour PA in a cohort of Norwegian older adults across CRF levels, gender and seasons.
PA was assessed objectively in 1219 older adults (70-77 years, 51% females) using the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer, and quantified as counts·min-1 (CPM). Weather (Norwegian meteorological Institute) and CRF (MetaMax II) were measured objectively. Panel data analysis added a longitudinal dimension when 110.888 hours of weather- and PA data were analyzed.
Older adults had a higher PA level in warmer (597 CPM) than colder months (556 CPM) (p
PubMed ID
29979711 View in PubMed
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