Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Individual and family environmental correlates of television and computer time in 10- to 12-year-old European children: the ENERGY-project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272494
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:912
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Maïté Verloigne
Wendy Van Lippevelde
Elling Bere
Yannis Manios
Éva Kovács
Monika Grillenberger
Lea Maes
Johannes Brug
Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:912
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Belgium
Child
Computers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Family Relations
Female
Germany
Greece
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Hungary
Male
Norway
Parents
Social Environment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Television
Abstract
The aim was to investigate which individual and family environmental factors are related to television and computer time separately in 10- to-12-year-old children within and across five European countries (Belgium, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Norway).
Data were used from the ENERGY-project. Children and one of their parents completed a questionnaire, including questions on screen time behaviours and related individual and family environmental factors. Family environmental factors included social, political, economic and physical environmental factors. Complete data were obtained from 2022 child-parent dyads (53.8 % girls, mean child age 11.2 ± 0.8 years; mean parental age 40.5 ± 5.1 years). To examine the association between individual and family environmental factors (i.e. independent variables) and television/computer time (i.e. dependent variables) in each country, multilevel regression analyses were performed using MLwiN 2.22, adjusting for children's sex and age.
In all countries, children reported more television and/or computer time, if children and their parents thought that the maximum recommended level for watching television and/or using the computer was higher and if children had a higher preference for television watching and/or computer use and a lower self-efficacy to control television watching and/or computer use. Most physical and economic environmental variables were not significantly associated with television or computer time. Slightly more individual factors were related to children's computer time and more parental social environmental factors to children's television time. We also found different correlates across countries: parental co-participation in television watching was significantly positively associated with children's television time in all countries, except for Greece. A higher level of parental television and computer time was only associated with a higher level of children's television and computer time in Hungary. Having rules regarding children's television time was related to less television time in all countries, except for Belgium and Norway.
Most evidence was found for an association between screen time and individual and parental social environmental factors, which means that future interventions aiming to reduce screen time should focus on children's individual beliefs and habits as well parental social factors. As we identified some different correlates for television and computer time and across countries, cross-European interventions could make small adaptations per specific screen time activity and lay different emphases per country.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;41(5):1460-7123045206
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2012 Nov;101(11):1170-422849438
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012;12:80522989231
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2013 Jan;52(1):70-623260837
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Mar;21(3):572-523592665
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014;14:85725134740
Cites: Prev Med. 2015 Jan;70:96-10125482419
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2009 Oct;38(2):147-5319809858
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 Mar-Apr;101(2):124-720524376
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010;10:27620500859
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2010 Aug;44(10):747-5518812418
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2011 Sep;45(11):937-4221807671
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2011 Sep;45(11):906-1321836174
Cites: Prev Med. 1999 Dec;29(6 Pt 1):563-7010600438
Cites: Int J Behav Med. 2004;11(3):152-6315496343
Cites: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2008 Mar;18(3):242-5118083016
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:9821936895
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:13622152048
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(4):e3474222558098
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2012 Aug;15(8):1380-9522269173
Cites: BMC Res Notes. 2012;5:43422888983
PubMed ID
26384645 View in PubMed
Less detail

International study of perceived neighbourhood environmental attributes and Body Mass Index: IPEN Adult study in 12 countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271539
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2015;12:62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij
Delfien Van Dyck
Deborah Salvo
Rachel Davey
Rodrigo S Reis
Grant Schofield
Olga L Sarmiento
Josef Mitas
Lars Breum Christiansen
Duncan MacFarlane
Takemi Sugiyama
Ines Aguinaga-Ontoso
Neville Owen
Terry L Conway
James F Sallis
Ester Cerin
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2015;12:62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Australia
Belgium
Bicycling
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Brazil
China
Colombia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic
Denmark
Environment
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Mexico
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
New Zealand
Obesity - ethnology - etiology
Overweight - ethnology - etiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Spain
United States
Walking
Young Adult
Abstract
Ecological models of health behaviour are an important conceptual framework to address the multiple correlates of obesity. Several single-country studies previously examined the relationship between the built environment and obesity in adults, but results are very diverse. An important reason for these mixed results is the limited variability in built environments in these single-country studies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine associations between perceived neighbourhood built environmental attributes and BMI/weight status in a multi-country study including 12 environmentally and culturally diverse countries.
A multi-site cross-sectional study was conducted in 17 cities (study sites) across 12 countries (Australia, Belgium, Brazil, China, Colombia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain, the UK and USA). Participants (n?=?14222, 18-66 years) self-reported perceived neighbourhood environmental attributes. Height and weight were self-reported in eight countries, and measured in person in four countries.
Three environmental attributes were associated with BMI or weight status in pooled data from 12 countries. Safety from traffic was the most robust correlate, suggesting that creating safe routes for walking/cycling by reducing the speed and volume of traffic might have a positive impact upon weight status/BMI across various geographical locations. Close proximity to several local destinations was associated with BMI across all countries, suggesting compact neighbourhoods with more places to walk related to lower BMI. Safety from crime showed a curvilinear relationship with BMI, with especially poor crime safety being related to higher BMI.
Environmental interventions involving these three attributes appear to have international relevance and focusing on these might have implications for tackling overweight/obesity.
Notes
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 2009;31:7-2019589839
Cites: J Urban Health. 2007 Mar;84(2):162-8417273926
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2010 Oct;44(13):924-3319406732
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 2007;29:129-4317533172
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2008 Jan;66(1):2-2018254880
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Jul;40(7 Suppl):S550-6618562973
Cites: Prev Med. 2008 Sep;47(3):241-5118499242
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2009 Feb;36(2):174-8119135908
Cites: Obes Rev. 2011 May;12(5):e173-8221348918
Cites: Health Place. 2011 Mar;17(2):519-2421233002
Cites: J Urban Health. 2009 Jan;86(1):19-3019052877
Cites: Obes Rev. 2011 May;12(5):e183-921348919
Cites: Prev Med. 2011 Jul-Aug;53(1-2):57-6021609730
Cites: Health Place. 2012 Jan;18(1):100-521983062
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Feb;44(2):280-721716148
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012;9:7022691723
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2009 Jun;36(6):484-9019460656
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Feb 12;377(9765):557-6721295846
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012;12:80722992438
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013;13:30923566032
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2013 May;10(4):581-60122975776
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2013 Aug;58(4):615-2523224518
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2013 Sep;45(3):269-7523953352
Cites: Am J Health Promot. 2013 Sep-Oct;28(1):23-3123458369
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 Sep;93(9):1552-812948979
Cites: Am J Health Promot. 2003 Sep-Oct;18(1):93-10213677967
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 May;105(5 Suppl 1):S110-715867906
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Sep;38(9):1682-9116960531
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jan;15(1):188-9617228047
Cites: Health Place. 2010 Mar;16(2):175-9019880341
PubMed ID
25982214 View in PubMed
Less detail

Promoting fruit and vegetable consumption among European schoolchildren: rationale, conceptualization and design of the pro children project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29553
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):212-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Knut-Inge Klepp
Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo
Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij
P Pernille Due
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Jóhanna Haraldsdóttir
Jurgen Konig
Michael Sjostrom
Inga Thórsdóttir
Maria Daniel Vaz de Almeida
Agneta Yngve
Johannes Brug
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. k.i.klepp@medisin.uop.no
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):212-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Nutrition - education
Cohort Studies
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Nutrition Assessment
Parents - education
Questionnaires
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research Design
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: The Pro Children Project was designed to assess fruit and vegetable consumption in European schoolchildren and their parents, as well as determinants of the children's consumption patterns. A second objective was to develop and test strategies, applicable across Europe, for promoting consumption of fruits and vegetables among schoolchildren and their parents. In this paper, the rationale, theoretical background, overall design and implementation of the project is presented. METHODS: Surveys of national, representative samples of 11-year-old schoolchildren and their parents were conducted in 9 countries, i.e. in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Iceland, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain and Sweden. Comprehensive school-based educational programmes have been developed and tested in three settings, i.e. in Spain, the Netherlands and in Norway. A precoded 24-hour recall form combined with a set of food frequency questions assessing regular intake were used to assess fruit and vegetable consumption. Determinants were assessed employing a comprehensive theoretical framework including personal, social and environmental factors related to fruit and vegetable consumption. The intervention programmes have been tested employing a group-randomized trial design where schools have been randomly allocated to an intervention arm and a delayed intervention arm. Surveys among all participating children and their parents were conducted prior to the initiation of the intervention, immediately after the end of the intervention and at the end of the subsequent school year. CONCLUSION: The project is expected to provide new information of great importance for improving our understanding of consumption patterns of fruits and vegetables and for guiding future efforts to promote increased consumption patterns across Europe.
PubMed ID
16088084 View in PubMed
Less detail

What do parents think about parental participation in school-based interventions on energy balance-related behaviours? a qualitative study in 4 countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129407
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:881
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Wendy Van Lippevelde
Maïté Verloigne
Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij
Mona Bjelland
Nanna Lien
Juan M Fernández-Alvira
Luis A Moreno
Eva Kovacs
Johannes Brug
Lea Maes
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Watersportlaan 2, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. wendy.vanlippevelde@ugent.be
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:881
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Belgium
Energy intake
Female
Focus Groups
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Hungary
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Obesity - prevention & control
Overweight - prevention & control
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Schools
Spain
Abstract
Overweight and obesity in youth has increased dramatically. Therefore, overweight prevention initiatives should start early in life and target modifiable energy balance-related behaviours. Parental participation is often advocated as important for school-based interventions, however, getting parents involved in school-based interventions appears to be challenging based on earlier intervention experiences. The purpose of this study was to get insight into the determinants of and perspectives on parental participation in school-interventions on energy balance-related behaviours (physical activity, healthy eating, sedentary behaviours) in parents of ten- to twelve-year olds in order to develop an effective parental module for school-based interventions concerning energy balance-related behaviours.
Four countries (Belgium, Hungary, Norway and Spain) conducted the focus group research based on a standardised protocol and a semi-structured questioning route. A variation in parental socio-economic status (SES) and parental school involvement was taken into account when recruiting the parents. The audio taped interviews were transcribed, and a qualitative content analysis of the transcripts was conducted in each country.
Seventeen focus group interviews were conducted with a total of 92 parents (12 men, 80 women). Physical activity was considered to be a joint responsibility of school and parents, nutrition as parent's responsibility but supported by the school, and prevention of sedentary behaviours as parent's sole responsibility. Parents proposed interactive and practical activities together with their child as the best way to involve them such as cooking, food tasting, nutrition workshops, walking or cycling tours, sport initiations together with their child. Activities should be cheap, on a convenient moment, focused on their children and not on themselves, not tutoring, not theoretical, and school-or home-based.
Parents want to be involved in activities related to energy balance-related behaviours if this implies 'doing things together' with their child at school or at home.
Notes
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2005 Dec;18(6):431-4316351702
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2005 Mar;20(1):19-2615668217
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2006 Sep;132(5):667-9116910747
Cites: Obes Rev. 2007 Mar;8(2):129-5417300279
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2008 Apr;62(1):107-1518352969
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Dec;32(12):1780-919079319
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33 Suppl 1:S74-8119363514
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2009 Aug;37(2):141-919589450
Cites: BMC Med. 2009;7:4919765270
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(6):781-9720070915
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2010 Apr;25(2):199-21018502732
Cites: Obes Rev. 2010 May;11(5):338-5319780989
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010;10:27620500859
Cites: Prev Med. 2010 Aug;51(2):103-1120462509
Cites: Obes Rev. 2010 Dec;11(12):835-4620973911
Cites: Med Clin North Am. 2000 Mar;84(2):333-4610793645
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000 May;32(5):963-7510795788
Cites: Br J Nutr. 1999 Apr;81 Suppl 2:S133-710999038
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2003 Apr;16(2):89-9612662367
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2004 Jan;62(1):39-5014995056
Cites: Obes Rev. 2004 May;5 Suppl 1:4-10415096099
Cites: Int J Behav Med. 2004;11(3):152-6315496343
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Sep;78(9):1156-603407811
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1997 May-Jun;88(3):184-919303809
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1998 Nov;15(4):298-3159838974
Cites: Future Child. 2006 Spring;16(1):109-4216532661
PubMed ID
22112159 View in PubMed
Less detail