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Comparison of caged and native blue mussels (Mytilus edulis spp.) for environmental monitoring of PAH, PCB and trace metals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288264
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2017 Sep;130:221-232
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Merete Schøyen
Ian J Allan
Anders Ruus
Jarle Håvardstun
Dag Ø Hjermann
Jonny Beyer
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2017 Sep;130:221-232
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Environmental monitoring
Metals
Mytilus
Mytilus edulis
Norway
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Contaminant bioaccumulation was studied in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis spp.) using the harbor waters of Kristiansand (Norway) as a case study. A suite of chemical contaminants (trace metals, PAHs and PCBs) was analyzed in caged and native mussels as well as in passive samplers (Diffusive Gradients in Thin films (DGT)-devices and silicone rubbers) placed alongside the mussels for estimation of contaminant concentrations in water and uptake rates and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) in mussels during a six-months deployment period. Estimated logBAFs were in the ranges 2.3-5.5, 3.8-5.2 and 3.2-4.4 for metals, PCBs and PAHs, respectively. Contaminant levels in caged mussels increased rapidly to stable levels for trace metals, whereas for hydrophobic organic contaminants the increase was steady but slow and for many compounds did not reach the levels observed in native mussels. Some key issues related to mussel caging design, such as mussel deployment time and confounding influence from seasonal fluctuations, are discussed herein.
PubMed ID
28801106 View in PubMed
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Detection of tris(2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate and other organophosphorous compounds in Arctic rivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294514
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Oct; 25(28):28730-28737
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Ian J Allan
Øyvind A Garmo
Jan Thomas Rundberget
Petr Terentjev
Guttorm Christensen
Nikolay A Kashulin
Author Affiliation
Oslo Centre for Interdisciplinary Environmental and Social Research, Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Gaustadalléen 21, NO-0349, Oslo, Norway. ian.allan@niva.no.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Oct; 25(28):28730-28737
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The flame-retardant tris(2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate (TDBrPP) was in the 1970s banned for uses in textiles that may be in contact with the skin, owing to strong suspicions that the substance was a human carcinogen. The substance is looked for but rarely detected in samples from the built and natural environments, but there are indications that TDBrPP is still in use. Here, we report the measurement of a polymer-water partition coefficient (Kpw) for two types of silicone rubber (SR), allowing quantitative estimation of freely dissolved concentrations of TDBrPP by passive sampling in water. We found levels of 100 to 200 pg/L in two Arctic rivers that were sampled during a 2014-2015 survey of contamination using passive samplers in Norwegian and Russian rivers draining into the Barents Sea. We also report the widespread presence of other organophosphorus flame retardants in this survey of eight rivers that drain into the Barents Sea.
PubMed ID
30121771 View in PubMed
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Detection of tris(2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate and other organophosphorous compounds in Arctic rivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299482
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Oct; 25(28):28730-28737
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Ian J Allan
Øyvind A Garmo
Jan Thomas Rundberget
Petr Terentjev
Guttorm Christensen
Nikolay A Kashulin
Author Affiliation
Oslo Centre for Interdisciplinary Environmental and Social Research, Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Gaustadalléen 21, NO-0349, Oslo, Norway. ian.allan@niva.no.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Oct; 25(28):28730-28737
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental monitoring
Flame Retardants - analysis
Norway
Organophosphates - analysis
Organophosphorus Compounds - analysis
Rivers
Russia
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The flame-retardant tris(2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate (TDBrPP) was in the 1970s banned for uses in textiles that may be in contact with the skin, owing to strong suspicions that the substance was a human carcinogen. The substance is looked for but rarely detected in samples from the built and natural environments, but there are indications that TDBrPP is still in use. Here, we report the measurement of a polymer-water partition coefficient (Kpw) for two types of silicone rubber (SR), allowing quantitative estimation of freely dissolved concentrations of TDBrPP by passive sampling in water. We found levels of 100 to 200 pg/L in two Arctic rivers that were sampled during a 2014-2015 survey of contamination using passive samplers in Norwegian and Russian rivers draining into the Barents Sea. We also report the widespread presence of other organophosphorus flame retardants in this survey of eight rivers that drain into the Barents Sea.
PubMed ID
30121771 View in PubMed
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Determination of silicone rubber and low-density polyethylene diffusion and polymer/water partition coefficients for emerging contaminants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284645
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2016 Sep;35(9):2162-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Marina G Pintado-Herrera
Pablo A Lara-Martín
Eduardo González-Mazo
Ian J Allan
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2016 Sep;35(9):2162-72
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calibration
Diffusion
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - chemistry
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Flame Retardants - analysis
Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Perfume - analysis - chemistry
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis - chemistry
Polyethylene - chemistry
Rivers - chemistry
Silicone Elastomers - chemistry
Sunscreening Agents - analysis - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
There is a growing interest in assessing the concentration and distribution of new nonregulated organic compounds (emerging contaminants) in the environment. The measurement of freely dissolved concentrations using conventional approaches is challenging because of the low concentrations that may be encountered and their temporally variable emissions. Absorption-based passive sampling enables the estimation of freely dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants of emerging concern in water. In the present study, calibration was undertaken for 2 polymers, low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and silicone rubber for 11 fragrances, 5 endocrine-disrupting compounds, 7 ultraviolet (UV) filters, and 8 organophosphate flame retardant compounds. Batch experiments were performed to estimate contaminant diffusion coefficients in the polymers (Dp ), which in general decreased with increasing molecular weight. The values for fragrances, endocrine-disrupting compounds, and UV filters were in ranges similar to those previously reported for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, but were 1 order of magnitude lower for organophosphate flame retardant compounds. Silicone rubber had higher Dp values than LDPE and was therefore selected for further experiments to calculate polymer/water partition coefficients (KPW ). The authors observed a positive correlation between log KPW and log octanol/water partition coefficient values. Field testing of silicone rubber passive samplers was undertaken though exposure in the River Alna (Norway) for an exposure time of 21?d to estimate freely dissolved concentration. Some fragrances and UV filters were predominant over other emerging and regulated contaminants, at levels up to 1600?ng?L(-1) for galaxolide and 448?ng?L(-1) for octocrylene. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2162-2172. © 2016 SETAC.
PubMed ID
26833936 View in PubMed
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Partitioning of persistent hydrophobic contaminants to different storage lipid classes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305000
Source
Chemosphere. 2021 Jan; 263:127890
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2021
Author
Anders Ruus
Ian J Allan
Kine Bæk
Katrine Borgå
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Gaustadalléen 21, 0349, Oslo, Norway; Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1066 Blindern, 0316, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: anders.ruus@niva.no.
Source
Chemosphere. 2021 Jan; 263:127890
Date
Jan-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Ecosystem
Environmental Pollutants - chemistry
Food chain
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions
Lipids - chemistry
Abstract
Lipids generally represent the major matrix contributing to the absorptive capacity for hydrophobic organic contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to determine whether contaminants partition to a different degree to the different storage lipid classes: wax ester (WE) and triacylglycerol (TAG). This was undertaken by studying experimentally the partitioning of organochlorine compounds between lipids (WE or TAG) and silicone rubber phase. Our results indicate that hydrophobic compounds have a slightly higher affinity for WE than for TAG. The findings thus corroborate earlier suggestions that contaminants accumulate to a greater extent in food webs with a higher reliance of on WE, such as in the Arctic. This knowledge is of interest since it implies that possible changes in planktonic community species composition, and thereby possible changes in the lipid composition, may have consequences for accumulation of hydrophobic contaminants in apex predators. However, the magnitude of these consequences remains unknown, and there may well be other factors of importance for previously observed higher accumulation of contaminants in Arctic systems. Thus, we have here identified aspects regarding partitioning of contaminants to lipids that need further scrutiny, and there is a need for further quantitative estimates of the suggested difference in absorptive capacities for hydrophobic contaminants between WE and TAG.
PubMed ID
32814130 View in PubMed
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Photodegradation of PAHs in passive water samplers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270105
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2016 Feb 11;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-11-2016
Author
Ian J Allan
Guttorm Christensen
Kine Bæk
Anita Evenset
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2016 Feb 11;
Date
Feb-11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Losses of deuterated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) used as performance reference compounds (PRCs) in semipermeable membrane devices deployed at fifteen coastal sampling sites near Harstad harbour in Northern Norway were used to investigate photodegradation of these photosensitive compounds. Unusual PRC dissipation profiles, especially for samplers exposed
PubMed ID
26876557 View in PubMed
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Should silicone prostheses be considered for specimen banking? A pilot study into their use for human biomonitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107970
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:462-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Ian J Allan
Kine Bæk
Alfhild Kringstad
Helge E Roald
Kevin V Thomas
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Gaustadalléen 21, Oslo Centre for Interdisciplinary Environmental and Social Research, Oslo NO-0349, Norway. ian.allan@niva.no
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:462-8
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Burden
Breast Implants
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Female
Humans
Medical Waste Disposal
Middle Aged
Milk, human - chemistry
Norway
Pilot Projects
Silicones - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Persistent organic pollutant (POP) biomonitoring in humans is challenging and generally carried out using blood, breast milk or adipose tissue, with concentrations normalised to the lipid content of the sample matrix. The goal of this cross-sectional pilot study was to evaluate the validity and feasibility of explanted silicone prostheses as a matrix for persistent organic pollutant biomonitoring in humans. We postulate that pollutant concentrations in silicone prostheses inserted in the body will equilibrate with that in the body over time and provide a measure of the overall body burden. This study included silicone prostheses from 22 female patients of the Colosseum clinic (Oslo, Norway) collected between September 2010 and April 2012. Absorption of chlorinated and brominated POPs into silicone prostheses during implantation was observed. Relative levels of the different contaminants measured in prostheses were in agreement with those from serum and breast milk analyses from the general Norwegian population. The comparison of serum and breast milk-based literature data with prosthesis concentrations transposed into lipid-normalised concentrations supports the validity of the prosthesis measurements. The median of relative percent differences between measurements with replicate silicone prostheses from 11 patients was below 30%. Observed increases in prosthesis concentrations with patients' age were found to be very similar to literature data from studies of the Norwegian population. Silicone prostheses therefore represent a promising matrix for the biomonitoring of nonpolar and non-ionic pollutants in humans. Sample accessibility and body burden representativeness of the silicone prostheses suggest that specimen banking should be initiated.
PubMed ID
23955326 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.