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A 24-year follow-up of body mass index and cerebral atrophy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9325
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2004
Author
D. Gustafson
L. Lissner
C. Bengtsson
C. Björkelund
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. deb.gustafson@neuro.gu.se
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Date
Nov-23-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Atrophy
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cerebral Cortex - pathology - radiography
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the longitudinal relationship between body mass index (BMI), a major vascular risk factor, and cerebral atrophy, a marker of neurodegeneration, in a population-based sample of middle-aged women. METHODS: A representative sample of 290 women born in 1908, 1914, 1918, and 1922 was examined in 1968 to 1969, 1974 to 1975, 1980 to 1981, and 1992 to 1993 as part of the Population Study of Women in Göteborg, Sweden. At each examination, women completed a survey on a variety of health and lifestyle factors and underwent anthropometric, clinical, and neuropsychiatric assessments and blood collection. Atrophy of the temporal, frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes was measured on CT in 1992 when participants were age 70 to 84. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between BMI and brain measures. RESULTS: Women with atrophy of the temporal lobe were, on average, 1.1 to 1.5 kg/m2 higher in BMI at all examinations than women without temporal atrophy (p
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2005 Jun 14;64(11):1990-1; author reply 1990-115955971
SummaryForPatientsIn: Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):E19-2015557485
PubMed ID
15557505 View in PubMed
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The ACE Insertion Deletion polymorphism relates to dementia by metabolic phenotype, APOEepsilon4, and age of dementia onset.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99087
Source
Neurobiol Aging. 2010 Jun;31(6):910-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
D R Gustafson
L. Melchior
E. Eriksson
V. Sundh
K. Blennow
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. deb.gustafson@neuro.gu.se
Source
Neurobiol Aging. 2010 Jun;31(6):910-6
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Apolipoprotein E4 - genetics
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - blood - complications - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Male
Metabolic Diseases - etiology
Mutagenesis, Insertional - genetics
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - blood - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may play a role in dementia pathogenesis because of its effects on vascular and metabolic homeostasis, amyloid metabolism, and learning and memory. The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), a pivotal RAS protein, is encoded for by a gene containing a functional ID variant, which has been related to dementia risk. We examined the relationship between the ACE Insertion Deletion (ACE ID) variant and dementia with consideration for metabolic phenotypes, age and APOEepsilon4 using a population-based, cross-sectional sample of 891 Swedish women and men aged 70-92 years, of whom 61 people were demented. The odds of dementia was two-fold higher among those with ACE II genotype, and ranged from 2.18 to 4.35 among those with dementia onset
PubMed ID
18838196 View in PubMed
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[An orthopedic surgical center for rheumatic patients]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14717
Source
Lakartidningen. 1979 Dec 12;76(50):4628-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-1979

Blood pressure and risk of dementia: results from the Rotterdam study and the Gothenburg H-70 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52423
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2001 Jan-Feb;12(1):33-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Ruitenberg
I. Skoog
A. Ott
O. Aevarsson
J C Witteman
B. Lernfelt
F. van Harskamp
A. Hofman
M M Breteler
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2001 Jan-Feb;12(1):33-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood pressure
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Comparative Study
Dementia - etiology - physiopathology
Diastole
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Abstract
The association between blood pressure and dementia is debated. Results from population-based studies on blood pressure and dementia are inconclusive, and most are performed in subjects younger than 80 years of age. We examined the relation between blood pressure and dementia and the possible effect modification of this relation by age in a pooled dataset based on two prospective population-based studies. Subjects came from the Rotterdam study (n = 6,668), a longitudinal population-based study among subjects aged 55 years and over, and from the Gothenburg H-70 Study (n = 317), a study on subjects aged 85 years at baseline. Screening and diagnostic procedures for assessment of dementia were similar at baseline and follow-up and comparable between studies. We estimated relative risks of dementia using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, adjusted for age, gender and study location. The average follow-up was 2.1 years. During this period, 196 subjects developed dementia. The risk of dementia decreased with increasing blood pressure level (per 10 mm Hg systolic blood pressure: RR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.88-0.99; per 10 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure: RR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.79-1.00). This association was confined to subjects who used anthypertensive medication. Persons who were demented at baseline had a stronger blood pressure decline during follow-up than those who were non-demented. This study suggests an inverse association between blood pressure and dementia risk in elderly persons on antihypertensive medication. Possibly, they may need higher blood pressure levels to maintain an adequate cerebral perfusion. Alternatively, lower blood pressure may be secondary to brain lesions in preclinical stages of dementia.
PubMed ID
11125239 View in PubMed
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The clinical implications of cognitive impairment in elderly patients with chronic heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53851
Source
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2001 Oct;16(1):47-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
I. Ekman
B. Fagerberg
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nursing, Göteborg University, Sweden. inger.ekman@fhs.gu.se
Source
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2001 Oct;16(1):47-55
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Cognition Disorders - complications
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - complications - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine whether cognitive dysfunction was associated with poor participation in an outpatient treatment program for patients with chronic heart failure and if it was related to specific patient characteristics. Cognitive function was measured with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Twenty-three of 78 (29%) patients randomized to structured care did not participate in this program and nonparticipation during 6-month follow-up was associated with an MMSE score below the median and a low calculated creatinine clearance (CrCl) (R2=0.15, p=0.0025) at entry. In the entire group long duration of heart failure and low blood hemoglobin concentration were independently associated with an MMSE score below the median at entry (R2=0.14, p
PubMed ID
11587240 View in PubMed
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Cognitive test performance in relation to psychotic symptoms and paranoid ideation in non-demented 85-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45792
Source
Psychol Med. 2004 Apr;34(3):443-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
S. Ostling
B. Johansson
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Sweden. svante.ostling@neuro.gu.se
Source
Psychol Med. 2004 Apr;34(3):443-50
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - psychology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Humans
Male
Paranoid Disorders - psychology
Psychological Tests
Psychotic Disorders - psychology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Clinical studies suggest that psychotic and paranoid states in late life are associated with cognitive dysfunction. However, it is not clear whether this finding would be observed in general population samples of non-demented elderly, particularly after adjustment for potential confounding factors. METHOD: A representative sample of non-demented 85-year-olds living in the community or in institutions in Göteborg, Sweden (N = 347) was examined using a psychiatric and physical examination (including a medical history), key-informant interview, psychometric testing and review of medical records. Individuals with psychotic symptoms and paranoid ideation were compared with the mentally healthy regarding tests of verbal ability, inductive logical reasoning, spatial ability, perceptual speed, basic arithmetic, primary memory and secondary memory. RESULTS: Non-demented 85-year-olds with psychotic symptoms or paranoid ideation performed specifically worse on tests measuring verbal ability, logical reasoning and two tests of spatial ability after adjustment for sex, education, hearing impairment, visual deficits, somatic disorders, depression, 3-year-mortality rate and incident dementia. CONCLUSIONS: Psychotic symptoms and paranoid ideation were associated with lower performance on cognitive tests related to verbal ability, logical reasoning and spatial ability in non-demented 85-year-olds after adjustment for potential confounders.
PubMed ID
15259829 View in PubMed
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Dementia disorders in a birth cohort followed from age 85 to 88: The influence of mortality, refusal rate, and diagnostic change on prevalence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209097
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1997 Mar;9(1):11-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
O. Aevarsson
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Reykjavík, Landspítalinn, Iceland.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1997 Mar;9(1):11-23
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bias (epidemiology)
Cohort Studies
Dementia - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts
Prevalence
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence of dementia increased in women (from 31% to 46%) but not in men (from 27% to 25%) in a representative birth cohort followed from age 85 to 88. The increase was mostly attributed to a higher rate of new cases among women than among men. The proportion of moderate to severe dementia increased, and mild dementia decreased, mainly because of progression of mild dementias to severer forms and because most new cases were of moderate to severe degree. The proportion of vascular dementia was 47% at age 85 and 54% at 88 despite a higher mortality in vascular than in other dementias. Diagnosis changed to vascular dementia in 9 out of 31 cases of Alzheimer's disease because of new cerebrovascular events. This study illustrates that prevalence is influenced by several factors, such as number of new cases, refusal rate, diagnostic change, and mortality. These factors act in different directions and may differ between populations.
PubMed ID
9195275 View in PubMed
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Depression, cerebral atrophy, cognitive performance and incidence of dementia. Population study of 85-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46247
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;174:249-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
S. Pálsson
O. Aevarsson
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. sigpp@rsp.is
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;174:249-53
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrophy
Brain - pathology
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - pathology
Dementia - epidemiology - pathology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - pathology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hospital-based studies suggest that depression in old age relates to organic brain changes. AIMS: To determine whether these findings are confirmed in a population-based sample. METHOD: A population sample of non-demented 85-year-olds (227 mentally healthy and 62 with DSM-III-R depression were given a neuropsychiatric examination and computerised tomographic scans of the brain, and followed for three years. RESULTS: On the Mini-Mental State Examination, those with a low educational level with major depression performed worse than the mentally healthy; this distinction was not evident among those who had received higher education. Measures of brain atrophy were similar in depressed and mentally healthy individuals. The three-year incidence of dementia was increased in those with early-onset major depression. CONCLUSIONS: Higher education may protect against cognitive symptoms in depressed individuals. The association between depression and cerebral atrophy in the elderly is not very strong. The higher incidence of dementia in those with early-onset major depression may be due to a longer lifetime duration of depression, emphasising the importance of detecting and treating depression in the community.
PubMed ID
10448451 View in PubMed
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Detection of dementia in primary care: the Linköping study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72140
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2000 Jul-Aug;11(4):223-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Olafsdóttir
I. Skoog
J. Marcusson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Primary Care, The Health University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden. maria.olafsdottir@soc.liu.se
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2000 Jul-Aug;11(4):223-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Neuropsychological Tests
Physician's Practice Patterns
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We examined to what extent dementia and cognitive impairment are detected in a primary health care centre. A systematic sample of patients aged 70 years and above, who attended a primary health care centre for a doctor's consultation (n = 350) were examined with a neuropsychiatric examination and an interview with a close informant. Dementia was diagnosed according to DSM-III-R. Medical records from the health centre were examined for entries on cognitive decline or dementia, other diagnoses and prescribed drugs. The prevalence of dementia was 16.3% and a further 3.1% had questionable dementia. Cognitive disturbances or dementia were noted in case records in 15 out of 57 (26%) demented cases, and in 1 out of 11 (9%) questionable dementias. Compared to non-demented patients, the demented had more diagnoses and a higher number of prescribed drugs. Severity and duration of dementia were associated with an increased detection.
PubMed ID
10867449 View in PubMed
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Estimated ventricle size using Evans index: reference values from a population-based sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287670
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2017 Mar;24(3):468-474
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
D. Jaraj
K. Rabiei
T. Marlow
C. Jensen
I. Skoog
C. Wikkelsø
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2017 Mar;24(3):468-474
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Cerebral Ventricles - anatomy & histology - diagnostic imaging
Dementia - diagnostic imaging
Female
Humans
Hydrocephalus, Normal Pressure - diagnostic imaging
Male
Population
Reference Values
Sex Characteristics
Sweden
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Evans index is an estimate of ventricular size used in the diagnosis of idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). Values >0.3 are considered pathological and are required by guidelines for the diagnosis of iNPH. However, there are no previous epidemiological studies on Evans index, and normal values in adults are thus not precisely known. We examined a representative sample to obtain reference values and descriptive data on Evans index.
A population-based sample (n = 1235) of men and women aged =70 years was examined. The sample comprised people living in private households and residential care, systematically selected from the Swedish population register. Neuropsychiatric examinations, including head computed tomography, were performed between 1986 and 2000.
Evans index ranged from 0.11 to 0.46. The mean value in the total sample was 0.28 (SD, 0.04) and 20.6% (n = 255) had values >0.3. Among men aged =80 years, the mean value of Evans index was 0.3 (SD, 0.03). Individuals with dementia had a mean value of Evans index of 0.31 (SD, 0.05) and those with radiological signs of iNPH had a mean value of 0.36 (SD, 0.04).
A substantial number of subjects had ventricular enlargement according to current criteria. Clinicians and researchers need to be aware of the range of values among older individuals.
PubMed ID
28052454 View in PubMed
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45 records – page 1 of 5.