Skip header and navigation

Refine By

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Comparison of myosin isoenzymes present in skeletal and cardiac muscles of the Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus (L.). Sequential expression of different myosin heavy chains during development of the fast white skeletal muscle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6901
Source
Eur J Biochem. 1991 Feb 14;195(3):743-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-1991
Author
I. Martinez
J S Christiansen
R. Ofstad
R L Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Fisheries Technology Research, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Eur J Biochem. 1991 Feb 14;195(3):743-53
Date
Feb-14-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Animals
Arctic Regions
Comparative Study
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Fishes - growth & development
Heart - growth & development
Muscle Development
Muscles - enzymology
Myocardium - enzymology
Myosins - isolation & purification
Peptide Mapping
Rabbits
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The expression of myosin isoforms and their subunit composition in the white skeletal body musculature of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) of different ages (from 77-day embryos until about 5 years old) was studied at the protein level by means of electrophoretic techniques. Myosin from the white muscle displayed three types of light chain during all the developmental stages examined: two myosin light chains type 1 (LC1F) differing in both apparent molecular mass and pI, one myosin light chain type 2 (LC2F) and one myosin light chain type 3 (LC3F). The fastest-migrating form of LC1F seemed to be predominant during the embryonic and eleutheroembryonic periods. The slowest-migrating form of LC1F was predominant in the 5-year-old fish. Between 1 year and 4 years, both types of LC1F were present in similar amounts. Cardiac as well as red muscle myosin from 3-year-old fish had two types of light chain. The myosin light chains from atria and ventriculi were indistinguishable by two-dimensional electrophoresis, but were different from the myosin light chains from red muscle. Neither the light chains from cardiac nor red muscle were coexpressed with the myosin light chains of white muscle at any of the developmental stages examined. Two myosin heavy chain bands were resolved by SDS/glycerol/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the extract from embryos. One of the bands was present in minor amounts. The other, and most abundant, band comigrated with the only band found in the extracts of white muscle myosin from older fish. One-dimensional Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease peptide mapping of these bands revealed some differences during development of the white muscle tentatively interpreted as follows. The myosin heavy chain band present in minor amounts in the embryos may represent an early embryonic form that is replaced by a late embryonic or foetal form in the eleutheroembryos. The foetal myosin heavy chain appears to be present until the resorption of the yolk sack and beginning of the free-swimming stage. A new form of myosin heavy chain, termed neonatal and probably expressed around hatching, is present until about 1 year of age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1825632 View in PubMed
Less detail

Drug utilisation in outpatient children. A comparison among Tenerife, Valencia, and Barcelona (Spain), Toulouse (France), Sofia (Bulgaria), Bratislava (Slovakia) and Smolensk (Russia).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181104
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2004 Apr;60(2):127-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
E. Sanz
M A Hernández
S. Ratchina
L. Stratchounsky
M A Peiré
M. Lapeyre-Mestre
B. Horen
M. Kriska
H. Krajnakova
H. Momcheva
D. Encheva
I. Martínez-Mir
V. Palop
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of La Laguna, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain. esanz@ull.es
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2004 Apr;60(2):127-34
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bulgaria
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization
France
Humans
Outpatients
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prospective Studies
Russia
Slovakia
Spain
Abstract
Scarce information about comparative diagnostic and therapeutic patterns in paediatric outpatients of different countries is found in the literature.
To describe the similarities and differences observed in diagnosis and therapeutic patterns of paediatric patients of seven locations in different countries.
Cross-sectional, prospective, international comparative, descriptive study.
A randomly selected sample of 12,264 paediatric outpatients seen in consultation rooms of urban and rural areas and attended by paediatricians or general practitioners of the participating locations. Data on patient demographic information, diagnosis and pharmacological treatment were collected using pre-designed forms. Diagnoses were coded using the ICD-9 and drugs according to the ATC classification.
Among the ten most common diagnoses, upper respiratory tract infections are in the first position in all locations; asthma prevalence is highest in Tenerife (8.4%). Tonsillitis, otitis, bronchitis and dermatological affections are the most common diagnoses in all locations. Pneumonia is only reported in Sofia (3.8%) and Smolensk (2.3%). The average number of drugs prescribed per child varied from 1.3 in Barcelona to 2.9 in Smolensk. There are no great differences in the profile of pharmacological groups prescribed, but a considerable range of variations in antibiotic therapy is observed: prescription of cephalosporins is low in Smolensk (0.7%) and higher in the other locations, from 16.5% (Bratislava) to 28% (Tenerife). Macrolides prescriptions range from 12.6% (Toulouse) to 24.7% (Smolensk), except in Sofia where they drop to 5.6%. Trimethoprim and its combinations are used in Smolensk (23.3%), Sofia (11.8%) and Bratislava (8.7%). Check-up consultations are not recorded in Smolensk and Bratislava, whereas in Toulouse these visits account for 16.2% of all consultations and in the other locations the percentage varies from 6.1% (Tenerife) to 1.9% (Sofia). Homeopathic treatments are registered only in Toulouse.
Except in asthma prevalence, there are no great differences in diagnostic maps among locations. Significant variations in the number of drugs prescribed per child and antibiotic therapies are observed. Areas for improvement have been identified.
PubMed ID
15022033 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exposure to indoor air pollutants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, toluene, benzene) in Mexican indigenous women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130608
Source
Indoor Air. 2012 Apr;22(2):140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
L G Pruneda-Álvarez
F J Pérez-Vázquez
M. Salgado-Bustamante
R I Martínez-Salinas
N A Pelallo-Martínez
I N Pérez-Maldonado
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Toxicología Ambiental, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí, México.
Source
Indoor Air. 2012 Apr;22(2):140-7
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Benzene - adverse effects
Cooking
Energy-Generating Resources
Female
Heating - adverse effects
Hippurates - urine
Humans
Mexico
Middle Aged
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - adverse effects
Population Groups
Public Health
Pyrenes - analysis
Smoke - adverse effects
Sorbic Acid - analogs & derivatives - analysis
Toluene - adverse effects
Volatile Organic Compounds - adverse effects
Wood
Young Adult
Abstract
Indoor air pollution is considered to be a serious public health issue in Mexico; therefore, more studies regarding this topic are necessary. In this context, we assessed exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds in: (i) women who use firewood combustion (indoor) for cooking and heating using traditional open fire; (ii) women who use firewood combustion (outdoor) for cooking and heating using traditional open fire; and (iii) women who use LP gas as the principal energy source. We studied 96 healthy women in San Luis Potosi, México. Urine samples were collected, and analyses of the following urinary exposure biomarkers were performed by high-performance liquid chromatography: 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), trans, trans-muconic acid, and hippuric acid (HA). The highest levels of 1-OHP, trans, trans-muconic acid, and HA were found in communities where women were exposed to indoor biomass combustion smoke (or products; geometric mean ± s.d., 3.98 ± 5.10 µmol/mol creatinine; 4.81 ± 9.60 µg/l 1-OHP; 0.87 ± 1.78 mg/g creatinine for trans, trans-muconic acid; and 1.14 ± 0.91 g/g creatinine for HA). Our findings indicate higher exposure levels to all urinary exposure biomarkers studied in women who use indoor firewood combustion for cooking and heating (using traditional open fire).
High mean levels of 1-hydroxypyrene, t,t-muconic acid, and hippuric acid were found in women who use firewood combustion (indoor) for cooking and heating using traditional open fire and taking into account that millions of women and children in Mexico are living in scenarios similar to those studied in this report, the assessment of health effects in women and children exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds is urgently needed. Moreover, it is immediately necessary an intervention program to reduce exposure.
PubMed ID
21985234 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indoor air pollution in a Mexican indigenous community: evaluation of risk reduction program using biomarkers of exposure and effect.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160162
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2008 Feb 15;390(2-3):362-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2008
Author
Arturo Torres-Dosal
Iván N Pérez-Maldonado
Yolanda Jasso-Pineda
Rebeca I Martínez Salinas
Jorge A Alegría-Torres
Fernando Díaz-Barriga
Author Affiliation
Laboratorio de Toxicología Ambiental, Facultad de Medicina, Avenida Venustiano Carranza 2405, 78210, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P., Mexico.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2008 Feb 15;390(2-3):362-8
Date
Feb-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - prevention & control
Biological Markers - analysis
Carboxyhemoglobin - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Comet Assay
Cooking - methods
DNA Damage
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Mexico
Population Groups
Pyrenes - analysis
Risk Reduction Behavior
Wood
Abstract
Indoor air pollution can be an important risk factor for human health, considering that people spend more than 60% of their time indoors. Fifty percent of the world population and approximately 90% of the rural population in developing countries are using biomass as energy source. Latin America represents 12% of the global consumption of biomass; in Mexico, 27 million people use wood as an energy source. Therefore, in this study we evaluated a 3-stage risk reduction program. The stages were: 1) removal of indoor soot adhered to roofs and internal walls; 2) paving the dirt floors; and 3) introduction of a new wood stove with a metal chimney that expels smoke outdoors. The complete intervention program was applied. In 20 healthy subject residents from an indigenous community in San Luis Potosí, Mexico, we measured blood carboxyhemoglobin (% COHb), DNA damage (comet assay) in nucleated blood cells, and urinary 1-OHP levels before and after the program. Before intervention individuals had a geometric mean COHb level of 4.93% and 53% of the population presented levels above 2.5% considered a safe level. However, in all the studied individuals the levels of COHb were reduced to below 2.5% (mean level 1.0%) one month after the intervention. Moreover, when compared, DNA damage in people exposed before the intervention was higher (5.8+/-1.3 of Tail Moment) than when the program was introduced (2.8+/-0.9 of Tail Moment) (P>0.05) and a same trend was observed with urinary 1-OHP levels; 6.71+/-3.58 micromol/mol creatinine was the concentration before intervention; whereas, 4.80+/-3.29 micromol/mol creatinine was the one after the program. The results suggest that the intervention program offers an acceptable risk reduction to those families that use biomass for food cooking.
PubMed ID
18036639 View in PubMed
Less detail

Macroscopic sessile tumor architecture is a pathologic feature of biologically aggressive upper tract urothelial carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140179
Source
Urol Oncol. 2012 Sep;30(5):666-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Hans-Martin Fritsche
Giacomo Novara
Maximilian Burger
Amit Gupta
Kazumasa Matsumoto
Wassim Kassouf
Kanishka Sircar
Filiberto Zattoni
Tom Walton
Stefan Tritschler
Shiro Baba
Patrick J Bastian
Juan I Martínez-Salamanca
Christian Seitz
Wolfgang Otto
Wolf Ferdinand Wieland
Pierre I Karakiewicz
Vincenzo Ficarra
Arndt Hartmann
Shahrokh F Shariat
Author Affiliation
Caritas St. Josef Medical Center, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany.
Source
Urol Oncol. 2012 Sep;30(5):666-72
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asia
Canada
Carcinoma, Transitional Cell - pathology - surgery
Europe
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Staging
Nephrectomy - methods
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Ureter - surgery
Urologic Neoplasms - pathology - surgery
Urologic Surgical Procedures - methods
Abstract
Macroscopic sessile tumor architecture was associated with adverse outcomes after radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) for upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Before inclusion in daily clinical decision-making, the prognostic value of tumor architecture needs to be validated in an independent, external dataset. We tested whether macroscopic tumor architecture improves outcome prediction in an international cohort of patients.
We retrospectively studied 754 patients treated with RNU for UTUC without neoadjuvant chemotherapy at 9 centers located in Asia, Canada, and Europe. Tumor architecture was macroscopically categorized as either papillary or sessile. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses were used to address recurrence-free (RFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) estimates.
Macroscopic sessile architecture was present in 20% of the patients. Its prevalence increased with advancing pathologic stage and it was significantly associated with established features of biologically aggressive UTUC, such as tumor grade, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion, and concomitant CIS (all P values
PubMed ID
20933445 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sample preparation and DNA extraction procedures for polymerase chain reaction identification of Listeria monocytogenes in seafoods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11066
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1997 Apr 15;35(3):275-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1997
Author
A. Agersborg
R. Dahl
I. Martinez
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Fisheries and Aquaculture N-9005 Tromso, Norway.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1997 Apr 15;35(3):275-80
Date
Apr-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Base Sequence
DNA, Bacterial - analysis - chemistry - genetics
Decapoda (Crustacea) - microbiology
Detergents - pharmacology
Electrophoresis, Agar Gel
Endopeptidase K - pharmacology
Fish Products - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Food Poisoning - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Gene Amplification
Heat
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Muramidase - pharmacology
Norway - epidemiology
Octoxynol - pharmacology
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Abstract
Five grams of seafood products were inoculated with one to 500 viable or 10(9) heat-killed cells of Listeria monocytogenes. The presence of the pathogen was detected by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers specific for fragments of the listeriolysin O (hly) gene (two sets) and for the invasion-associated protein (iap) gene (one set). For DNA preparation, boiling, either alone or in combination with lysozyme and proteinase K treatment, was not always sufficient to lyse L. monocytogenes, while treatment with Triton X-100 produced consistently good DNA suitable for amplification. To avoid false-negative and false-positive results, 48 h incubations were necessary and a subculturing step after an initial 24 h incubation greatly improved the results. The primers that amplified regions of the listeriolysin O gene gave clearer and stronger products than primers for the invasion-associated protein gene. Using this method we were able to detect one to five L. monocytogenes cells in 5 g of product in a total of 55 h.
PubMed ID
9105938 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.