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Blood lipids and diet in Swedish adolescents living in Norsjö, an area with high incidence of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48660
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 Jun-Jul;80(6-7):667-74
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Larsson
I. Johansson
G. Hellsten
G. Hallmans
T. Ericson
A. Bruce
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, University of Umea, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 Jun-Jul;80(6-7):667-74
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Diet
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
In Norsjö in Northern Sweden a cardiovascular intervention programme, for adults is presently tested. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of factors related to cardiovascular disease in all 15-year-old adolescents living in Norsjö in 1987 and 1988. The total cholesterol concentration in serum, as an average for the test period, was 4.2 mmol/l and 4.7 mmol/l for boys and girls, respectively. Fourteen per cent of the boys and 32% of the girls had a total cholesterol concentration exceeding 5 mmol/l. Twenty-seven per cent of the adolescents had high values for two or more variables related to risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The evaluation of the dietary registrations showed unsatisfactory values for fibre, P/S ratio and total fat. The dietary habits were better in the 15-year-olds in 1988 than in 1987 as judged by significantly higher average daily intake of fibre as well as a higher content of fibre per megajoule in the food.
PubMed ID
1867085 View in PubMed
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Blood product ratio in acute traumatic coagulopathy--effect on mortality in a Scandinavian level 1 trauma centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138772
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2010;18:65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Jesper Dirks
Henrik Jørgensen
Carsten H Jensen
Sisse R Ostrowski
Pär I Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia, Centre of Head and Orthopedics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. Dirks@dadlnet.dk
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2010;18:65
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Cell Count
Blood Coagulation Disorders - blood - etiology - therapy
Blood Component Transfusion - methods
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Trauma Centers
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - blood - therapy
Abstract
Trauma is the leading cause of loss of life expectancy worldwide. In the most seriously injured patients, coagulopathy is often present on admission. Therefore, transfusion strategies to increase the ratio of plasma (FFP) and platelets (PLT) to red blood cells (RBC), simulating whole blood, have been introduced. Several studies report that higher ratios improve survival in massively bleeding patients. Here, the aim was to investigate the potential effect of increased FFP and PLT to RBC on mortality in trauma patients.
In a retrospective before and after study, all trauma patients primarily admitted to a level-one Trauma Centre, receiving blood transfusion, in 2001-3 (n = 97) and 2005-7 (n = 156), were included. In 2001-3, FFP and PLT were administered in accordance with the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) guidelines whereas in 2005-7, Hemostatic Control Resuscitation (HCR) entailing pre-emptive use of FFP and PLT in transfusion packages during uncontrolled haemorrhage and thereafter guided by thrombelastograph (TEG) analysis was employed. The effect of transfusion therapy and coagulopathy on mortality was investigated.
Patients included in the early and late period had comparable demography, injury severity score (ISS), admission hematology and coagulopathy (27% vs. 34% had APTT above normal). There was a significant change in blood transfusion practice with shorter time interval from admission to first transfusion (median time 3 min vs.28 min in massive bleeders, p
Notes
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Cites: Transfusion. 2010 Mar;50(3):701-1019929864
Cites: J Trauma. 2010 Sep;69(3):645-5220526211
Cites: J Trauma. 2003 Jul;55(1):39-4412855879
Cites: J Trauma. 2003 Jun;54(6):1127-3012813333
Cites: J Thromb Haemost. 2010 Sep;8(9):1919-2520553376
Cites: Vox Sang. 2005 Aug;89(2):92-616101690
Cites: Vox Sang. 2005 Oct;89(3):123-716146503
PubMed ID
21138569 View in PubMed
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Breast self-examination among Swedish women: a survey of frequency, knowledge, and attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23389
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1995;10(3):163-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
K. Persson
I. Johansson
A C Ek
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences Department of Caring Sciences, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1995;10(3):163-7
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Self-Examination
Comparative Study
Education
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupations
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Partners
Sweden
Abstract
Breast cancer is a common cause of death among women. The aim of this study was to determine whether women carry out regular breast self-examination (BSE), and to describe their knowledge of, and attitudes towards, breast cancer. Questionnaires were mailed to 200 randomly selected women who had not undergone breast cancer surgery. The response rate was 81%. The respondents were divided in three groups: those who practiced BSE regularly, those who practiced BSE occasionally, and those who did not practice BSE. The results show that only 10% of the sample practice BSE. Neither age, educational background, nor occupation, nor having knowledge of breast disease and medical outcome was associated with BSE practice. Nor did having a close relative or friend with breast cancer affect the practice of BSE.
PubMed ID
8534603 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease risk factors and dental caries in adolescents: effect of a preventive program in Northern Sweden (the Norsjö project).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72801
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1997 Jan;86(1):63-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
B. Larsson
I. Johansson
L. Weinehall
G. Hallmans
T. Ericson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1997 Jan;86(1):63-71
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Parents - education
Prevalence
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Since 1985 a 10 year prevention programme aiming to reduce cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been running in the county of Västerbotten in Northern Sweden. The project started in Norsjö. The present investigation is a study on dietary intake, medical CVD risk factors and dental caries in five cross-sectional groups of 15-year-olds during 5 years (1987-1991) of the "Norsjö project". Most of the measured medical and dietary variables followed a similar trend, i.e. a positive trend during the first 3 years (1987-1989) and in the last 2 years (1990-1991) the averages returned towards baseline values. Dental caries prevalence followed a similar trend. Parental educational level did not have a major influence on diet or medical CVD risk factors, but higher caries scores were noted in adolescents with parents with "low" education compared with adolescents where the parents had higher educational levels. The results from the study also point to the fact that dental caries prevalence together with body mass index may indicate adolescents with CVD risk factors at unfavourable levels. Dietary counselling by dental personnel to adolescents with high caries and moderate obesity can be of advantage in reducing caries risk, as well as risk for development of CVD at higher ages.
PubMed ID
9116429 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factors and the risk of Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270524
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jun;69(6):729-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
M. Vikdahl
L. Bäckman
I. Johansson
L. Forsgren
L. Håglin
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jun;69(6):729-33
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - physiopathology
Hypertension - physiopathology
Hypertriglyceridemia - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Overweight - physiopathology
Parkinson Disease - blood - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Waist-Height Ratio
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate whether serum triglycerides (S-TG), cholesterol, blood pressure and waist/height ratio are risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD).
A population-based sample within the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS) was used in this study (n=101?790 subjects). Cases with PD were identified prospectively in a community-based study of idiopathic Parkinsonism in the period 2004-2009 in the county of Västerbotten in northern Sweden. The case database obtained was crosslinked to the NSHDS. Eighty-four of 147 patients with PD had visited the primary health care 2-8 years before diagnosis for participation in the NSHDS. For each case, four referents from the NSHDS population were selected, matched for sex, age, year of health survey, subcohort and geographic area.
Cases had lower mean S-TG levels (P=0.007). After stratification for sex, the lower S-TG remained significant for men (P=0.006) but not for women (P=0.450), and these were confirmed by the conditional logistic regression for all cases, none adjusted (hazard ratio (HR): 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.42, 0.99) and after adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI) and physical activity (HR: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.39, 0.96). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was negatively associated with PD risk after adjustments for age, BMI and physical activity (HR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.97-0.99). Smoking and former smoking were associated with a reduced risk for PD.
We found lower S-TG and SBP 2-8 years before a diagnosis of PD. Smoking was confirmed to be negatively associated with PD, whereas recreational activity indicates a risk for women.
PubMed ID
25514902 View in PubMed
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Children with Down Syndrome: oral development and morphology after use of palatal plates between 6 and 18 months of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30789
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 2003 Sep;13(5):327-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
B. Bäckman
A-C Grevér-Sjölander
A-K Holm
I. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology/Paediatric Dentistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. birgitta.backman@odont.umu.se
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 2003 Sep;13(5):327-35
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Child Language
Comparative Study
Dental Occlusion
Down Syndrome - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mouth - growth & development - pathology - physiopathology
Myofunctional Therapy - instrumentation
Orthodontic Appliance Design
Orthodontic Appliances, Functional
Patient compliance
Proprioception - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensation - physiology
Speech - physiology
Speech Therapy
Sucking Behavior - physiology
Tongue - abnormalities - physiopathology
Tooth Eruption - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe oral development and morphology in 18-month-old children with Down syndrome (DS) treated with palatal plates in combination with structured communication and speech training. The aim is further to describe the design of the palatal plates, compliance in their use and to give a brief report of their effect on oral motor function and speech. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Forty-two children with DS were followed from
PubMed ID
12924988 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cigar and pipe smoking and cancer risk in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98017
Source
Int J Cancer. 2010 Feb 16;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2010
Author
Va McCormack
A. Agudo
Cc Dahm
K. Overvad
A. Olsen
A. Tjonneland
R. Kaaks
H. Boeing
J. Manjer
M. Almquist
G. Hallmans
I. Johansson
Md Chirlaque
A. Barricarte
M. Dorronsoro
L. Rodriguez
Ml Redondo
Kt Khaw
N. Wareham
N. Allen
T. Key
E. Riboli
P. Boffetta
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2010 Feb 16;
Date
Feb-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The carcinogenicity of cigar and pipe smoking is established but the effect of detailed smoking characteristics is less well defined. We examined the effects on cancer incidence of exclusive cigar and pipe smoking, and in combination with cigarettes, among 102395 men from Denmark, Germany, Spain, Sweden and UK in the EPIC cohort. Hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for cancer during a median 9 year follow-up from ages 35-70 years were estimated using proportional hazards models. Compared to never smokers, HR of cancers of lung, upper aero-digestive tract and bladder combined was 2.2 (95% CI: 1.3, 3.8) for exclusive cigar smokers (16 cases), 3.0 (2.1, 4.5) for exclusive pipe smokers (33 cases) and 5.3 (4.4, 6.4) for exclusive cigarette smokers (1069 cases). For each smoking type, effects were stronger in current than in ex-smokers, and in inhalers than in non-inhalers. Ever smokers of both cigarettes and cigars (HR 5.7 (4.4, 7.3), 120 cases) and cigarettes and pipes (5.1 (4.1, 6.4), 247 cases) had as high a raised risk as had exclusive cigarette smokers. In these smokers, the magnitude of the raised risk was smaller if they had switched to cigars or pipes only (i.e. quit cigarettes) and had not compensated with greater smoking intensity. Cigar and pipe smoking is not a safe alternative to cigarette smoking. The lower cancer risk of cigar and pipe smokers as compared to cigarette smokers is explained by lesser degree of inhalation and lower smoking intensity. (c) 2010 UICC.
PubMed ID
20162568 View in PubMed
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Coffee drinking and blood cholesterol--effects of brewing method, food intake and life style.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11976
Source
J Intern Med. 1991 Oct;230(4):299-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1991
Author
B. Lindahl
I. Johansson
F. Huhtasaari
G. Hallmans
K. Asplund
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Research, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1991 Oct;230(4):299-305
Date
Oct-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Chi-Square Distribution
Cholesterol - blood
Coffee
Cookery
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Abstract
The strongest correlations between coffee consumption and serum cholesterol levels have been found in countries where people drink coffee brewed by mixing coffee grounds directly in boiling water (boiled coffee). In the present study of a population-based sample of 1625 middle-aged subjects (the Northern Sweden MONICA Study), approximately 50% of the participants were drinking boiled coffee, and 50% were drinking filtered coffee. Consumers of boiled coffee had significantly higher serum cholesterol levels than consumers of filtered coffee. Subjects who drank boiled coffee reported a higher intake of fat. A linear multiple regression analysis with serum cholesterol as the dependent variable confirmed that boiled coffee was an important independent determinant of cholesterol levels. We conclude that subjects who drink boiled coffee have higher serum cholesterol levels than those who drink filtered coffee, and that the most likely explanation for this finding lies in the type of brewing method.
PubMed ID
1919422 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Collaboration facilitates family physicians work with sick leave. Västerbotten model provides support through sick leave billion].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122510
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 May 30-Jun 4;109(22):1090-3
Publication Type
Article

54 records – page 1 of 6.