Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

2nd Norwegian Environmental Toxicology Symposium: joining forces for an integrated search for environmental solutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90204
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2009;72(3-4):111
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009

May organic pollutants affect fish populations in the North Sea?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95766
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2006 Jan 8;69(1-2):125-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-8-2006
Author
Hylland Ketil
Beyer Jonny
Berntssen Marc
Klungsøyr Jarle
Lang Thomas
Balk Lennart
Author Affiliation
NIVA, Oslo, Norway. ketil.hylland@niva.no
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2006 Jan 8;69(1-2):125-38
Date
Jan-8-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Markers
Embryo, Nonmammalian - drug effects
Embryonic Development - drug effects
Environmental monitoring
Estrogens - toxicity
Fish Diseases - epidemiology
Fishes
North Sea
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
The North Sea is a highly productive area with large fish populations that have been extensively harvested over the past century. North Sea fisheries remain important to the surrounding countries despite declining fish stocks over the past decades. The main reason for declining fish stocks is nearly certainly overfishing, but other environmental pressures also affect fish populations, such as eutrophication, climate change, and exposure to metals and organic pollutants, including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols, and organochlorine compounds. There are three main sources of organic pollutants in the North Sea: atmospheric, land-based sources, and inputs from offshore gas and oil installations. All three sources contribute to elevated concentrations of organic pollutants in the North Sea compared to the Norwegian Sea. There is evidence that chlorinated organic contaminants were present in sufficiently high concentrations in the southern North Sea two decades ago, to alter embryonal development in fish. The results from extensive, long-term monitoring programs show that some diseases decreased whereas other increased in the southern North Sea and that, among other factors, contaminants may play a role in the temporal changes recorded in disease prevalence. Recent studies demonstrated that components in offshore effluents may affect fish reproduction and that tissues of fish near oil rigs are structurally different to tissues of fish from reference areas. Data on effluents from offshore activities have recently become available through an international workshop (BECPELAG) and follow-up studies.
PubMed ID
16291566 View in PubMed
Less detail