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Antihypertensive and lipid lowering treatment in 70-74 year old individuals--predictors for treatment and blood-pressure control: a population based survey. The Hordaland Health Study (HUSK).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80153
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2006;6:16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Brekke Mette
Hunskaar Steinar
Straand Jørund
Author Affiliation
Section for General Practice, Department of General Practice and Community Health, University of Oslo, Norway. mette.brekke@medisin.uio.no
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2006;6:16
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antilipemic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - drug therapy - mortality - physiopathology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - drug effects - physiology
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In an elderly, community based population we aimed at investigating antihypertensive and lipid lowering medication use in relation to own and familiar cardiovascular morbidity and diabetes mellitus, as well as to lifestyle factors and general health. We also examined levels of blood pressure in untreated and treated residents, to investigate factors correlating with blood pressure control. METHODS: A health survey carried out in 1997-9 in the county of Hordaland, Norway included a self-administered questionnaire mailed to 4,338 persons born in 1925-7. Drug use the day prior to filling in the questionnaire was reported. A health check-up was carried out, where their systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), body mass index (BMI), and serum-cholesterol level were recorded. RESULTS: One third of respondents used one or more antihypertensive drugs, while 13% of men and women were treated with a statin. Diabetes mellitus, own or relatives'cardiovascular disease, having quit smoking, physical inactivity, and overweight correlated with antihypertensive treatment. Mean blood pressure was lower in respondents not on treatment. Among those on treatment, 38% of men and 29% of women had reached a target BP-level of lower than 140/90 mm Hg. Own cardiovascular disease and a low BMI correlated with good BP-control. CONCLUSION: One third of 70-74 year old individuals living in the community used one or more antihypertensive drugs. Only around one third of those treated had reached a target BP-level of less than 140/90 mm Hg. Own cardiovascular disease and a low BMI correlated with good BP-control.
PubMed ID
17052334 View in PubMed
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Diabetes related risk factors did not explain the increased risk for urinary incontinence among women with diabetes. The Norwegian HUNT/EPINCONT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94289
Source
BMC Urol. 2009;9:11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Ebbesen Marit Helen
Hannestad Yngvild S
Midthjell Kristian
Hunskaar Steinar
Author Affiliation
Section for General Practice, Department of Public and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. marithelen@gmail.com
Source
BMC Urol. 2009;9:11
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown an association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and urinary incontinence (UI) in women, especially severe UI. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether diabetes related variables could explain this association. METHODS: The study is part of the EPINCONT study, which is based on the large Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 2 (HUNT 2), performed in the county of Nord-Trøndelag, Norway, during the years 1995 - 1997. Questions on diabetes and UI were answered by a total of 21 057 women aged 20 years and older. Of these 685 were identified as having diabetes, and thus comprise the population of our study. A variety of clinical and biochemical variables were recorded from the participants. RESULTS: Blood-glucose, HbA1c, albumine:creatinine ratio (ACR), duration of diabetes, diabetes treatment, type of diabetes, cholesterol and triglycerides did not significantly differ in women with and without UI in crude analyses. However, the diabetic women with UI had more hospitalizations during the last 12 months, more homecare, and a higher prevalence of angina and use of oestrogene treatment (both local and oral/patch). After adjusting for age, BMI, parity and smoking, there were statistically significant associations between any UI and angina (OR 1.89; 95% CI: 1.22 - 2.93), homecare (OR 1.72; 95% CI: 1.02 - 2.89), and hospitalization during the last 12 months (OR 1.67; 95% CI: 1.18 - 2.38). In adjusted analyses severe UI was also significantly associated with the same variables, and also with diabetes drug treatment (OR 2.10; 95% CI: 1.07 - 4.10) and stroke (OR 2.47; 95% CI: 1.09 - 5.59). CONCLUSION: No single diabetes related risk factor seems to explain the increased risk for UI among women with diabetes. However, we found associations between UI and some clinical correlates of diabetes.
PubMed ID
19740449 View in PubMed
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General preferences for involvement in treatment decision making among European women with urinary incontinence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78466
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2007 May;64(9):1914-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
O' Donnell Máire
Monz Brigitta
Hunskaar Steinar
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, Section for General Practice, University of Bergen, Kalfarveien 31, Bergen 5018, Norway. maire.odonnell@isf.uib.no
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2007 May;64(9):1914-24
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Data Collection
Europe
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient Participation
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Urinary Incontinence - therapy
Abstract
Current health care policies advocate patient participation in treatment decision making. Little evidence on possible differences between European women's preferences for involvement in this process exists. In this study we explore preferences for involvement in treatment decision making in 15 European countries in a sample of 9434 women seeking treatment for urinary incontinence in an outpatient setting. Their generally preferred role in treatment decisions was assessed using the Control Preferences Scale. Results show variations within and between countries in preferences for involvement in treatment decision making. The 'collaborative role' was the most preferred role in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands and the UK. In Greece, Portugal and Spain the 'passive role' was most preferred. Over a third of women in Denmark, Finland and Norway preferred an 'active role'. Multinominal regression analyses found that, after adjusting for case mix and factors previously associated with role preferences, country membership was strongly associated with role preferences, with women living in Southern European countries preferring a more passive role. Such clear differences are of interest in the current health care environment where active patient participation is being encouraged. Greater efforts need to be made to establish whether patient preferences are genuine or merely a learned response influenced by cultural attitudes and traditions so that a balance can be struck between assisting women to play a more active role in the treatment decision-making process without disregarding some women's genuine preferences to play a more passive role.
PubMed ID
17360093 View in PubMed
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GPs' use of defibrillators and the national radio network in emergency primary healthcare in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86192
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2008 Jun;26(2):123-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Zakariassen Erik
Hunskaar Steinar
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care, Norway. erik.zakariassen@isf.uib.no
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2008 Jun;26(2):123-8
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
After-Hours Care
Ambulances
Defibrillators - utilization
Electric Countershock - utilization
Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems - utilization
Emergency medical services
Family Practice
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Humans
Norway
Physician's Role
Physicians, Family
Primary Health Care
Transportation
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the geographic size of out-of-hours districts, the availability of defibrillators and use of the national radio network in Norway. DESIGN: Survey. SETTING: The emergency primary healthcare system in Norway. SUBJECTS: A total of 282 host municipalities responsible for 260 out-of-hours districts. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Size of out-of-hours districts, use of national radio network and access to a defibrillator in emergency situations. RESULTS: The out-of-hours districts have a wide range of areas, which gives a large variation in driving time for doctors on call. The median longest transport time for doctors in Norway is 45 minutes. In 46% of out-of-hours districts doctors bring their own defibrillator on emergency callouts. Doctors always use the national radio network in 52% of out-of-hours districts. Use of the radio network and access to a defibrillator are significantly greater in out-of-hours districts with a host municipality of fewer then 5000 inhabitants compared with host municipalities of more than 20,000 inhabitants. CONCLUSION: In half of out-of-hours districts doctors on call always use the national radio network. Doctors in out-of-hours districts with a host municipality of fewer than 5000 inhabitants are in a better state of readiness to attend an emergency, compared with doctors working in larger host municipalities.
PubMed ID
18570012 View in PubMed
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The Hordaland Women's Cohort: a prospective cohort study of incontinence, other urinary tract symptoms and related health issues in middle-aged women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92360
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:296
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Jahanlu David
Qureshi Samera Azeem
Hunskaar Steinar
Author Affiliation
Section for General Practice, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. david.jahanlu@isf.uib.no
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:296
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Socioeconomic Factors
Urinary Incontinence - classification - complications - epidemiology
Urologic Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence (UI) is a prevalent symptom in middle-aged women, but data on incidence is limited and rarely reported. In order to analyze incidence, remission, or development patterns of severity and types of UI, we have established a 15-year prospective cohort (1997-2012). METHODS: The Cohort is based on the national collection of health data gathered from county studies (CONOR). Hordaland Health Study (HUSK) is one of them from Hordaland County. Each of the county studies may have local sub-studies and our Cohort is one of them. The Cohort included women aged 40-45 in order to have a broad approach to women's health including UI and other lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). A one fifth random sampling from HUSK was used to create the Cohort in 1997-1999. For the necessary sample size a preliminary power calculation, based on a 70% response rate at inclusion and 5% annual attrition rates was used. The Cohort is planned to collect data through questionnaires every second year for the 15-year period from 1997-2012. DISCUSSION: The Cohort represents a relatively large random sample (N = 2,230) of about 15% of the total population of women born between 1953-57 in the county of Hordaland. Our data shows that the cohort population is very similar to the source population. The baseline demographic, social and medical characteristics of the Cohort are compared with the rest of women in HUSK (N = 7,746) and there were no significant differences between them except for the level of education (P = 0.001) and yearly income (P = 0.018), which were higher in the Cohort population. Urological characteristics of participants from the Cohort (N = 1,920) were also compared with the other participants (N = 3,400). There were no significant statistical differences except for somewhat more urinary continence (P = 0.04), more stress incontinence (P = 0.048) and smaller amount of leakage (P = 0.015) in the Cohort. In conclusion, the Cohort is population-based, with little selection bias, and thus is a rather unique study for investigating UI and LUTS in comparison with many other projects with similar purposes.
PubMed ID
18721479 View in PubMed
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Population-based survey of urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, and other lower urinary tract symptoms in five countries: results of the EPIC study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80176
Source
Eur Urol. 2006 Dec;50(6):1306-14; discussion 1314-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Irwin Debra E
Milsom Ian
Hunskaar Steinar
Reilly Kate
Kopp Zoe
Herschorn Sender
Coyne Karin
Kelleher Con
Hampel Christian
Artibani Walter
Abrams Paul
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, United States. dirwin@email.unc.edu
Source
Eur Urol. 2006 Dec;50(6):1306-14; discussion 1314-5
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder, Overactive - epidemiology - physiopathology
Urinary Incontinence - epidemiology - physiopathology
Urodynamics - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Estimate the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI), overactive bladder (OAB), and other lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) among men and women in five countries using the 2002 International Continence Society (ICS) definitions. METHODS: This population-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted between April and December 2005 in Canada, Germany, Italy, Sweden, and the United Kingdom using computer-assisted telephone interviews. A random sample of men and women aged >/= 18 yr residing in the five countries and who were representative of the general populations in these countries was selected. Using 2002 ICS definitions, the prevalence estimates of storage, voiding, and postmicturition LUTS were calculated. Data were stratified by country, age cohort, and gender. RESULTS: A total of 19,165 individuals agreed to participate; 64.3% reported at least one LUTS. Nocturia was the most prevalent LUTS (men, 48.6%; women, 54.5%). The prevalence of storage LUTS (men, 51.3%; women, 59.2%) was greater than that for voiding (men, 25.7%; women, 19.5%) and postmicturition (men, 16.9%; women, 14.2%) symptoms combined. The overall prevalence of OAB was 11.8%; rates were similar in men and women and increased with age. OAB was more prevalent than all types of UI combined (9.4%). CONCLUSIONS: The EPIC study is the largest population-based survey to assess prevalence rates of OAB, UI, and other LUTS in five countries. To date, this is the first study to evaluate these symptoms simultaneously using the 2002 ICS definitions. The results indicate that these symptoms are highly prevalent in the countries surveyed.
PubMed ID
17049716 View in PubMed
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Preferences for involvement in treatment decision-making among Norwegian women with urinary incontinence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94039
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(11):1370-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
O'Donnell Máire
Hunskaar Steinar
Author Affiliation
Section for General Practice, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(11):1370-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Participation
Patient satisfaction
Role
Socioeconomic Factors
Urinary Incontinence - psychology - therapy
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Current health policies advocate patient participation in treatment decision-making. Objective. To explore whether role preferences among women with urinary incontinence (UI) change depending on the treatment decision-making context. We also explore what factors are associated with role preferences and changes in role preferences. METHODS: A national telephone survey of 265 women with UI identified from 1,000 randomly selected Norwegian women aged 18 or over. The interview included questions on socioeconomic factors, general health status, UI-related factors, and role preferences. Women were categorised as preferring an 'active', 'collaborative', or 'passive' role in treatment decision-making based on their selection of a response from the Control Preferences Scale. RESULTS: Women's preferences changed significantly when considering UI treatment decision-making compared to treatment decision-making generally (p
Notes
Erratum In: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(4):484
PubMed ID
17851820 View in PubMed
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Preferences for involvement in treatment decision-making generally and in hormone replacement and urinary incontinence treatment decision-making specifically.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85210
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Nov;68(3):243-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
O'Donnell Máire
Hunskaar Steinar
Author Affiliation
Section for General Practice, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. maire.odonnell@isf.uib.no
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Nov;68(3):243-51
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Decision Making
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Participation
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Urinary Incontinence - psychology - therapy
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore whether preferences for involvement in treatment decision-making change depending on the context and factors associated with preferences. METHODS: A national telephone survey of 1000 randomly selected Norwegian women aged 18 years or over using the Control Preferences Scale (CPS) to assess preferences. RESULTS: More women preferred an active role when asked about hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and urinary incontinence (UI) treatment decision-making specifically than when asked a question about preferences for involvement when generally making treatment decisions. Higher education and very good general health were significantly associated with preferring an active role in HRT and UI treatment decision-making. A negative attitude towards HRT was also significantly associated with preferring an active role when considering HRT. Women with higher educational levels were significantly more likely to choose an option from the CPS that indicated a preference for wanting more involvement in HRT decision-making compared to treatment decision-making generally. CONCLUSIONS: Women's preferences for involvement in treatment decision-making change depending on the context as do factors associated with role preferences. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Health care professionals need to be aware that patients' preferences may change depending on the context of the treatment decision.
PubMed ID
17904327 View in PubMed
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Psychotropic drug use in the Norwegian general population in 2005: data from the Norwegian Prescription Database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89203
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2009 Jul;18(7):572-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Kjosavik Svein R
Ruths Sabine
Hunskaar Steinar
Author Affiliation
Section for General Practice, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. svein.kjosavik@isf.uib.no
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2009 Jul;18(7):572-8
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyse psychotropic drug utilisation patterns in the general population of Norway in 2005. METHODS: Data on 4,163,045 prescriptions of psychotropic drugs dispensed at all pharmacies in Norway during 2005 were extracted from The Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD), including antipsychotics (ATC-code N05A), anxiolytics (N05B), hypnotics (N05C) and antidepressants (N06A). This information was merged with data concerning the 3857 general practitioners (GPs) from the Norwegian Regular GP Scheme. RESULTS: A total of 705,230 individuals, or 15.3% of the general population, received at least one prescription of a psychotropic drug. The figures for the four therapeutic subgroups were 2.4% for antipsychotics, 6.2% for anxiolytics, 7.9% for hypnotics and 6.0% for antidepressants, respectively. For all subgroups, prevalence was higher among women than among men, and increased steadily by patients' age. The mean annual drug volume per patient was highest among persons aged 40-59 years, except for hypnotics where it continued to increase with age. GPs prescribed 80% of overall psychotropic drug volume, psychiatrists 5%, and other prescribers 15%. The proportion of the drugs issued by the three prescriber groups differed with the patients' age group. While children and adolescents received a relatively large share from paediatricians and child and adolescent psychiatrists, adults mostly got their prescriptions from GPs. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of psychotropic drugs were prescribed by GPs. Overall drug use increased significantly, and psychiatrists' contribution decreased significantly with patients' age. The quality of pharmacological treatment for mental health problems of the general and aging population therefore relies mainly on the GPs.
PubMed ID
19402032 View in PubMed
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Sentinel monitoring of activity of out-of-hours services in Norway in 2007: an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88371
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2009;9:123
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Hansen Elisabeth Holm
Zakariassen Erik
Hunskaar Steinar
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care, Unifob Health, Kalfarveien 31, NO-5018 Bergen, Norway. elisabeth.holm-hansen@isf.uib.no
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2009;9:123
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In Norway, no valid activity statistics from the primary health care out-of-hours services or the pre-hospital emergency health care system have previously been available. METHODS: The National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care has initiated an enterprise called "The Watchtowers" which consists of a representative sample of seven casualty clinics covering 18 Norwegian municipalities. The purpose of the project is to provide routine information over several years, which will enable monitoring, evaluation and comparison of the activities in the out-of-hours services. This paper presents data from 2007, the first full calendar year for the Watchtowers, analyzes some differences in user patterns for the seven casualty clinics involved, and estimates national figures for the use of casualty clinics and out-of-hours services in Norway. RESULTS: A total of 85 288 contacts were recorded during 2007 [399 per 1,000 inhabitants] of which 64,846 contacts were considered non-urgent [76.6%]. There were 53 467 consultations by a doctor [250 per 1,000], 8,073 telephone consultations by doctor [38 per 1,000], 2,783 home visits and call-outs by doctor [13 per 1,000] and 20,502 contacts managed by nurses on their own [96 per 1000]. The most common mode of contact was by telephone. Women, young children and elderly had the highest rates of contact. CONCLUSION: Norway has a high rate of contacts to the out-of-hours services compared with some other countries with available data. Valid national figures and future research of these services are important both for local services and policy makers.
PubMed ID
19624832 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.