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A 10,000-year record of Arctic Ocean sea-ice variability--view from the beach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101296
Source
Science. 2011 Aug 5;333(6043):747-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-5-2011
Author
Svend Funder
Hugues Goosse
Hans Jepsen
Eigil Kaas
Kurt H Kjær
Niels J Korsgaard
Nicolaj K Larsen
Hans Linderson
Astrid Lyså
Per Möller
Jesper Olsen
Eske Willerslev
Author Affiliation
Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5-7, DK 1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark. svf@snm.ku.dk
Source
Science. 2011 Aug 5;333(6043):747-50
Date
Aug-5-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We present a sea-ice record from northern Greenland covering the past 10,000 years. Multiyear sea ice reached a minimum between ~8500 and 6000 years ago, when the limit of year-round sea ice at the coast of Greenland was located ~1000 kilometers to the north of its present position. The subsequent increase in multiyear sea ice culminated during the past 2500 years and is linked to an increase in ice export from the western Arctic and higher variability of ice-drift routes. When the ice was at its minimum in northern Greenland, it greatly increased at Ellesmere Island to the west. The lack of uniformity in past sea-ice changes, which is probably related to large-scale atmospheric anomalies such as the Arctic Oscillation, is not well reproduced in models. This needs to be further explored, as it is likely to have an impact on predictions of future sea-ice distribution.
PubMed ID
21817051 View in PubMed
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Mid-latitude net precipitation decreased with Arctic warming during the Holocene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298956
Source
Nature. 2019 04; 568(7750):83-87
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
04-2019
Author
Cody C Routson
Nicholas P McKay
Darrell S Kaufman
Michael P Erb
Hugues Goosse
Bryan N Shuman
Jessica R Rodysill
Toby Ault
Author Affiliation
School of Earth and Sustainability, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA. cody.routson@nau.edu.
Source
Nature. 2019 04; 568(7750):83-87
Date
04-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The latitudinal temperature gradient between the Equator and the poles influences atmospheric stability, the strength of the jet stream and extratropical cyclones1-3. Recent global warming is weakening the annual surface gradient in the Northern Hemisphere by preferentially warming the high latitudes4; however, the implications of these changes for mid-latitude climate remain uncertain5,6. Here we show that a weaker latitudinal temperature gradient-that is, warming of the Arctic with respect to the Equator-during the early to middle part of the Holocene coincided with substantial decreases in mid-latitude net precipitation (precipitation minus evapotranspiration, at 30° N to 50° N). We quantify the evolution of the gradient and of mid-latitude moisture both in a new compilation of Holocene palaeoclimate records spanning from 10° S to 90° N and in an ensemble of mid-Holocene climate model simulations. The observed pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that a weaker temperature gradient led to weaker mid-latitude westerly flow, weaker cyclones and decreased net terrestrial mid-latitude precipitation. Currently, the northern high latitudes are warming at rates nearly double the global average4, decreasing the Equator-to-pole temperature gradient to values comparable with those in the early to middle Holocene. If the patterns observed during the Holocene hold for current anthropogenically forced warming, the weaker latitudinal temperature gradient will lead to considerable reductions in mid-latitude water resources.
PubMed ID
30918401 View in PubMed
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