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[Diagnosis coding of the musculoskeletal system in general practice]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92011
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Sep 8;170(37):2881-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-8-2008
Author
Nielsen Mette Nørby
Aaen-Larsen Birger
Vedsted Peter
Nielsen Claus Vinter
Hjøllund Niels Henrik
Author Affiliation
Hjøllund Region Midtjylland, Center for Folkesundhed, APU Arhus - Almen Praksis ved Universitetet i Arhus. mettenorby@hotmail.com
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Sep 8;170(37):2881-4
Date
Sep-8-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Family Practice
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - classification - diagnosis
Registries
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Danish general practitioners are encouraged to code diagnoses according to the Danish version of ICPC. In order to evaluate feasibility, we aimed to estimate sensitivity of ICPC coding of patients with symptoms from the musculoskeletal system (ICPC L01-20 and 83-99) in general practice compared to health information from other sources. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We identified patients connected to one general practice in July 2005. We retrieved information on referred care by specialists in neurology, rheumatology, and orthopaedic surgery as well as treatments by physiotherapists from the Danish Health Insurance. We received ICD10 codes within chapter 8 (diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue) from the Danish Hospital Register. Sensitivity was calculated according to criteria based on whether the patients had received an ICD10 code or other public health services. RESULTS: Of 2649 patients registered in the general practice, 496 had recorded an ICPC code in chapter L (the musculoskeletal system). Sensitivity was calculated to 0.83. Of all patients with musculoskeletal diseases 82.5% were identified by ICPC codes, but only 45% by other health sources. CONCLUSION: The coding of ICPC in a general practice had an acceptable sensitivity and constitutes a useful opportunity to identify a group of patients with musculoskeletal diseases. An optimal identification of specific patient subgroups, by using ICPC coding, requires the construction of a national registry of the ICPC coding made in all Danish general practices.
PubMed ID
18796284 View in PubMed
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Register-based follow-up of social benefits and other transfer payments: accuracy and degree of completeness in a Danish interdepartmental administrative database compared with a population-based survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84756
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2007;35(5):497-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Hjollund Niels Henrik
Larsen Finn Breinholt
Andersen Johan Hviid
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark. nhh@folkesundhed.au.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2007;35(5):497-502
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease - economics - rehabilitation
Cost of Illness
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income
Insurance Benefits
Insurance, Health
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions
Questionnaires
Registries
Rehabilitation, Vocational - economics
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Sick Leave - economics
Social Security
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Social consequences of disease may be subject to register based follow-up. A Danish database, DREAM, allows weekly follow-up of any public transfer payment. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of the register for use in public health research. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The DREAM database includes information on all public transfer payments administered by Danish ministries, municipalities, and Statistics Denmark for all Danish citizens on a weekly basis since 1991. The DREAM database was compared with self-reported information on sources of income in a population survey from 2001 with about 5000 participants. RESULTS: According to DREAM, 80.2% of respondents had received some kind of transfer income since 1991. For the week they filled in the questionnaire, 9.0% had a record of labour-market-related benefit (unemployment benefit, social assistance, wage subsidy), 6.4% a health-related benefit (sickness benefit, vocational rehabilitation allowance, salary from subsidized jobs for persons with limited work capacity, anticipatory pension), 10.1% a voluntary retirement pension, while 74.4% had no record of transfer payment for that week. The predictive value of DREAM was 74.8% for health-related transfer payment and 98.2% for self-support. Among persons with a record of sickness benefit, 52.4% reported no transfer payment. CONCLUSION: The DREAM database is feasible for follow-up of social and economic consequences of disease. Respondents may be unaware of payments transferred by the public authorities to the employer, and in such cases DREAM may be the best source of information. The database is useful for public health research, but may also be useful for socioeconomic analyses of selection bias and dropout from other studies.
PubMed ID
17852980 View in PubMed
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