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Babesia spp. and other pathogens in ticks recovered from domestic dogs in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269558
Source
Parasit Vectors. 2015;8:262
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Christen Rune Stensvold
Dua Al Marai
Lee O'Brien Andersen
Karen Angeliki Krogfelt
Jørgen Skov Jensen
Kim Søholt Larsen
Henrik Vedel Nielsen
Source
Parasit Vectors. 2015;8:262
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic - microbiology - parasitology
Babesia - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Babesiosis - epidemiology - parasitology
Borrelia - genetics - isolation & purification
Denmark
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Dogs
Female
Ixodes - parasitology
Male
Rickettsia - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
Newly recognized endemic foci for human babesiosis include Europe, where Ixodes ricinus, a vector for several species of Babesia, is the most commonly identified tick. Vector-based surveillance provides an early warning system for the emergence of human babesiosis, which is likely to be under-reported at emerging sites. In the present study, we set out to screen I. ricinus collected from Danish domestic dogs for Babesia, in order to identify whether humans in Denmark are exposed to the parasite.
A total of 661 ticks (Ixodes spp.) were collected from 345 Danish domestic dogs during April-September 2011 and pooled, one sample per dog. DNA was extracted from each sample and examined by PCR and sequencing for Rickettsia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Bartonella spp., Francisella tularensis, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, and Babesia spp. In total, 34% of the samples were positive for tick-borne microorganisms potentially pathogenic to humans: Rickettsia spp. were detected in 16% of the pools, with 79% being R. helvetica. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato was found in 15%, with the main species identified as Borrelia afzelii (39%). Likewise, 8% of the samples were positive for Babesia spp. (Babesia microti, 82%; Babesia venatorum ('EU1'), 18%). Lastly, 1% of the samples tested positive for Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, and 0.6% for Bartonella spp. No ticks were found to be infected with Francisella tularensis.
Our data are in support of endemic occurrence of potentially zoonotic Babesia in Denmark and confirms I. ricinus as a vector of multiple pathogens of public health concern.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25951937 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blastocystis sp. subtype 4 is common in Danish Blastocystis-positive patients presenting with acute diarrhea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101680
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2011 Jun;84(6):883-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Christen Rune Stensvold
Dorte Bang Christiansen
Katharina Elisabeth Pribil Olsen
Henrik Vedel Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Parasitology, Department of Microbiological Diagnostics, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, Copenhagen, Denmark. RUN@ssi.dk
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2011 Jun;84(6):883-5
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Blastocystis - classification - isolation & purification
Blastocystis Infections - epidemiology - parasitology
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Protozoan - isolation & purification
Denmark - epidemiology
Diarrhea - parasitology
Feces - parasitology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Young Adult
Abstract
Fecal samples from 444 Danish patients presenting with acute diarrhea were tested for Blastocystis and positive samples were subtyped to investigate the prevalence and subtype distribution of Blastocystis in this patient group. A total of 25 patients (5.6%) were positive, and 19 of these patients (76.0%) were positive for Blastocystis sp. ST4. Because the relative prevalence of ST4 in other patients presenting with other types of diarrhea (persistent, travel-related, and human immunodeficiency virus-related) in Denmark is low, the role of Blastocystis sp. ST4 in the etiology of acute diarrhea should be investigated further.
PubMed ID
21633023 View in PubMed
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Childhood diarrhoea in Danish day care centres could be associated with infant colic, low birthweight and antibiotics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276818
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2016 Jan;105(1):90-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Betina Hebbelstrup Jensen
Dennis Röser
Bente Utoft Andreassen
Katharina E P Olsen
Henrik Vedel Nielsen
Bent Bjørn Roldgaard
Susanne Schjørring
Hengameh Chloé Mirsepasi-Lauridsen
Steffen L Jørgensen
Esben Munk Mortensen
Andreas Munk Petersen
Karen Angeliki Krogfelt
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2016 Jan;105(1):90-5
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Colic - complications
Denmark
Diarrhea - etiology
Diarrhea, Infantile - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Male
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Diarrhoea is very common in children attending day care centres. The aim of this study was to examine certain predisposing risk factors for an association with diarrhoea, including foreign travel, treatment with antibiotics, having household pets, infant colic, bottle feeding, using a pacifier and low birthweight.
A dynamic one-year follow-up cohort study comprising 179 children from 36 day care centres was conducted from September 2009 to July 2013 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Questionnaires were sent to the children's parents or legal guardians every two months for a year, requesting information on gastrointestinal symptoms and exposure. A logistic regression was performed to identify the odds ratios of different risk factors for diarrhoea.
The odds ratios for diarrhoea were 1.97 (0.93-4.20) for children with a history of infant colic, 1.91 (0.90-4.04) for low birthweight children and 1.45 (0.74-2.82) for children who had used antibiotics. Having a pet in the household had a possible protective effect towards diarrhoeal events, with an odds ratio of 0.47 (0.20-1.09).
A history of infant colic, low birthweight, and to a lesser extent antibiotic use, possibly increased the risk of diarrhoea in Danish children in day care centres.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2016 Jan;105(1):13-426725576
PubMed ID
26355526 View in PubMed
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Comparison of microscopy and PCR for detection of intestinal parasites in Danish patients supports an incentive for molecular screening platforms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129582
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2012 Feb;50(2):540-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Christen Rune Stensvold
Henrik Vedel Nielsen
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2012 Feb;50(2):540-1
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - methods
Denmark
Humans
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic - diagnosis
Mass Screening - methods
Microscopy - methods
Parasites - isolation & purification
Parasitology - methods
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Notes
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PubMed ID
22090410 View in PubMed
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Congenital toxoplasmosis-a report on the Danish neonatal screening programme 1999-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96524
Source
J Inherit Metab Dis. 2010 Jun 29;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-29-2010
Author
Dennis Röser
Henrik Vedel Nielsen
Eskild Petersen
Peter Saugmann-Jensen
Peter Bent Nørgaard-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiological Surveillance and Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Inherit Metab Dis. 2010 Jun 29;
Date
Jun-29-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This paper reports on the national neonatal screening programme for congenital toxoplasmosis (CT) in Denmark conducted from 1999 to 2007, including background, basis for initiation of screening, methods, results, and finally reasons for the discontinuation of the screening. METHODS: A nationwide screening was conducted at Statens Serum Institut, including >98% newborns, and using filter paper eluates (Guthrie card, PKU card) obtained from newborns 5-10 days old. These were analysed for Toxoplasma gondii-specific antibodies (IgM), and if positive, then IgM (ISAGA). Confirmatory serology was performed on children and their mothers (IgM, IgG, IgA, dye test) where infection was suspected, and children with suspected or confirmed CT initiated a 3-month treatment regimen with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and folinic acid supplements. Selective cohorts were followed with regard to developmental and clinical outcome. RESULTS: A total of 100 children were diagnosed with CT in the screening period, and only 2 cases were detected outside of the screening programme. CT prevalence was 1.6 per 10,000 live-born infants. Follow-up studies showed new retinochoroidal lesions in affected children despite treatment. CONCLUSION: Screening was terminated August 2007, after it became apparent that no benefit of treatment could be shown. CT was evaluated using a Danish adaptation of the Uniform Screening Panel (ACMG), showing CT as an unlikely candidate for screening today. Whereas results might be comparable with other low-endemic countries with similar strains of T. gondii, neonatal screening and treatment might offer different results in regions with either high prevalence or different strains of T. gondii.
PubMed ID
20585987 View in PubMed
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Cryptosporidium infections in Denmark, 2010-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270640
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 May;62(5)
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Christen Rune Stensvold
Steen Ethelberg
Louise Hansen
Sumrin Sahar
Marianne Voldstedlund
Michael Kemp
Gitte Nyvang Hartmeyer
Erik Otte
Anne Line Engsbro
Henrik Vedel Nielsen
Kåre Mølbak
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 May;62(5)
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - parasitology
Cryptosporidium - isolation & purification
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Feces - parasitology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
The incidence of cryptosporidiosis in Denmark is unknown. Here, we present the number of cases detected in the 2010-2014 period along with data on species and subtypes.
Complete national data retrieved from the Danish Microbiology Database and Statens Serum Institut (SSI) comprised test results on cryptosporidia detected by microscopy or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) between 1 January 2010 and 30 April 2014. Samples that tested positive at the SSI were submitted to species and subtype analysis by conventional PCR and sequencing of ribosomal and gp60 genes, respectively.
A total of 689 Cryptosporidium-positive stool samples were submitted by 387 patients. Limiting case episodes to two months (60 days), a total of 388 case episodes representing 387 patients were identified. Cryptosporidiosis was most common among infants and toddlers. Moreover, a peak in incidence was observed among younger adults aged 23-24 years. In 43 Cryptosporidium-positive faecal samples, identification was performed to species and subtype level. Cryptosporidium parvum was found in 34 samples, C. hominis in eight, and C. meleagridis in one sample; C. parvum subtypes IIaA15G2R1 (n = 10) and IIaA16G3R1 (n = 5) were predominating.
Cryptosporidia are a significant cause of diarrhoea in Denmark. Outbreaks may not be detected due to continued use of diagnostic tests of limited sensitivity and due to lack of surveillance. With molecular methods now being introduced in many Danish laboratories, we propose establishing national surveillance of cryptosporidiosis.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
26050832 View in PubMed
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Diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis by two-dimensional immunoblot differentiation of mother and child immunoglobulin g profiles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29920
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2005 Feb;43(2):711-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Henrik Vedel Nielsen
Dorte Remmer Schmidt
Eskild Petersen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Parasitology, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark. hvn@ssi.dk
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2005 Feb;43(2):711-5
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Protozoan - blood
Antibody Specificity
Antigens, Protozoan - immunology
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Immunoblotting - methods
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Infant, Newborn
Neonatal Screening
Toxoplasma - immunology
Toxoplasmosis - diagnosis - parasitology
Toxoplasmosis, Congenital - diagnosis - parasitology
Abstract
Differentiation between the specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) response to Toxoplasma gondii by a mother and her newborn child is helpful in the diagnosis of congenital infection with T. gondii in newborns without T. gondii-specific IgM and/or IgA antibodies at birth. Previous methods include immunoblotting and complexing T. gondii antigen with the sera from the mother and child and comparing the bands after electrophoresis. We developed a two-dimensional immunoblotting (2DIB) method with T. gondii RH strain tachyzoite antigen and validated the method with sera from 11 children identified through the neonatal screening program for congenital toxoplasmosis in Denmark. The children were identified by using Toxoplasma-specific IgM antibodies at the screening test, but the presence of T. gondii-specific IgM and/or IgA antibodies could not be confirmed at the subsequent serum sample tested. The children were monitored for at least 12 months, and in seven of eight patients monitored for 12 months the results of the 2DIB-predicted congenital infection were confirmed by the presence of persistent Toxoplasma-specific IgG antibodies. 2DIB is a sensitive technique that allows early differentiation between passively transferred maternal T. gondii-specific IgG antibodies and antibodies synthesized by the newborn child.
PubMed ID
15695668 View in PubMed
Less detail

The disease burden of congenital toxoplasmosis in Denmark, 2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285843
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(5):e0178282
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Janna Nissen
Pikka Jokelainen
Christen Rune Stensvold
Chiara Trevisan
Josefine Fuchs
Kristoffer Sølvsten Burgdorf
Henrik Vedel Nielsen
Sara M Pires
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(5):e0178282
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Toxoplasmosis, Congenital - epidemiology
Abstract
Congenital toxoplasmosis (CT) causes a substantial disease burden worldwide. The aim of this study was to estimate the disease burden of CT in Denmark, a developed country with free public healthcare and nationwide data available.
Using data primarily from two public health surveillance programmes conducted between 1992 and 2007, we estimated the incidence, occurrence of sequelae, mortality and the burden of disease in terms of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) of CT in Denmark in 2014.
We estimated that 14 children were born with CT in 2014, of which six will have developed sequelae by the age of 12. CT resulted in a total disease burden of 123 DALYs (95% uncertainty interval [UI], 100-148), of which 78 (95% UI, 64-94) were due to foetal loss and 2 (95% UI, 1-3) were due to neonatal death; the remaining burden was due to moderate to severe life-long sequelae. A comparison of the estimated incidence of CT with the number of reported CT cases in 2008-2014 indicated that for each reported CT case, at least five other CT cases could be expected to have occurred and gone unreported.
Early onset, severity, and life-long duration of sequelae have a major effect on the disease burden of CT. Our data suggest that CT is under-diagnosed or under-reported in Denmark. The estimated disease burden and public health impact in Denmark is lower than in other European countries, highlighting the need for country-specific studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28558051 View in PubMed
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The prevalence and clinical significance of intestinal parasites in HIV-infected patients in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100310
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2010 Oct 11;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-11-2010
Author
Christen Rune Stensvold
Susanne Dam Nielsen
Jens-Henrik Badsberg
J X00f8 Rgen Engberg
Nina Friis-M X00f8 Ller
Sanne S X00f8 Gaard Nielsen
Henrik Vedel Nielsen
Alice Friis-M X00f8 Ller
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Parasitology, Department of Microbiological Diagnostics, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2010 Oct 11;
Date
Oct-11-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Abstract To investigate the prevalence and clinical significance of intestinal parasites in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, faecal specimens from 96 HIV-infected patients were submitted to microbiological analyses, including microscopy and polymerase chain reaction for protozoa and enteropathogenic bacteria. Results of microbiological analyses were compared with self-reported gastrointestinal complaints collected using a validated questionnaire. Thirty-two (33%) patients were positive for parasites. However, opportunistic parasites (Isospora and Cryptosporidium) were detected in only 2 instances. Entamoeba dispar was detected in 10 cases, 9 of which represented men who have sex with men (MSM). Despite generally low HIV RNA loads and high CD4+ T-cell counts, 42% of the 76 patients reporting symptoms complained of diarrhoea, 31% of whom were parasite-positive. The presence of diarrhoea was not associated with the presence or absence of parasites; neither was it associated with receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) in general, or protease inhibitors (PI) in particular. A CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/mm3 was not associated with parasitic infection or with diarrhoea. The data show that diarrhoea is a common symptom among HIV-infected patients in Denmark, but do not indicate that the diarrhoea is due to intestinal parasites.
PubMed ID
20936912 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.