Skip header and navigation

Refine By

21 records – page 1 of 3.

ACE genotype and physical training effects: a randomized study among elderly Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49706
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2003 Aug;15(4):284-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Henrik Frederiksen
Lise Bathum
Charlotte Worm
Kaare Christensen
Lis Puggaard
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Epidemiology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. hfrederiksen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2003 Aug;15(4):284-91
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomechanics
Body Composition
Denmark
Exercise
Exercise Test
Frail Elderly
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Oxygen consumption
Patient Selection
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - genetics
Walking - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The level of physical functioning (PF) late in life has, in recent years, been shown to be influenced by genetic factors. One of the most extensively studied genetic variants associated with PF and trainability is insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in the gene encoding Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE). However, ACE studies have mainly been conducted among younger persons in excellent physical shape. In this study, we examine whether the level of PF, trainability, or rate-of-change are associated with the ACE genotype among the elderly. METHODS: We used data from 4 randomized training studies of elderly Danes (N = 203). The measures of PF were self-report, maximal oxygen uptake, muscle strength, walking speed, and body composition. RESULTS: Overall, a favorable change in the measures of PF was observed in training groups compared with control groups. However, within groups, neither pre- or post-training/control period levels of PF nor differences in pre- and post-levels were associated with the ACE genotype. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of our randomized studies, we could not detect any association between the ACE genotype and the level of PF or change, regardless of whether response to physical training or spontaneous changes was studied.
PubMed ID
14661817 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age trajectories of genetic variance in physical functioning: a longitudinal study of Danish twins aged 70 years and older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183160
Source
Behav Genet. 2003 Mar;33(2):125-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Kaare Christensen
Henrik Frederiksen
James W Vaupel
Matt McGue
Author Affiliation
The Danish Twin Registry, Epidemiology, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark. kchristensen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Behav Genet. 2003 Mar;33(2):125-36
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Denmark
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Questionnaires
Abstract
Genetic-evolutionary theories of aging predict that the genetic variance for fitness traits increases with age, while epidemiological-gerontological theories predict an increase in the environmental variance for most traits. In this study we examine the age trajectories of the genetic and environmental variance in physical functioning in a sample of 4731 Danish twins aged 70+ who are being followed longitudinally every second year with up to four assessments completed. A biometric growth model (Neale and McArdle, 2000) was applied to a validated physical ability score. The model included an overall level effect, a rate of linear change effect, and residual effects. The best-fitting model was a sex-specific model including additive genetic and nonshared environmental factors affecting level and rate of change and only nonshared environmental factors affecting the wave-specific levels. For both sexes there is an approximate doubling of both the total variance and the genetic variance in the physical ability score over the four waves and, hence, a rather stable heritability. However, the heritability is approximately.10 for males and.30 for females in all four waves. The heritability of level and slope showed a similar pattern:.11-14 in males and.35-.39 in females. The increase in both additive genetic variance and environmental variance is in agreement with genetic-evolutionary and epidemiological-gerontological theories of aging, respectively. The present study suggests that overall level of strength may be a better phenotype for future molecular genetic studies on physical functioning in the elderly than rate of change, because rate of change is vulnerable to sample attrition due to mortality and dropout and because four waves were needed to be able to detect a heritability for rate of change of the same magnitude as the heritability for level of physical functioning.
PubMed ID
14574147 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between low self-rated health and heterozygosity for -110A > C polymorphism in the promoter region of HSP70-1 in aged Danish twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179751
Source
Biogerontology. 2004;5(3):169-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Ripudaman Singh
Steen Kølvraa
Peter Bross
Niels Gregersen
Bjørn Andersen Nexø
Henrik Frederiksen
Kaare Christensen
Suresh I S Rattan
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Genetics, University of Aarhus, DK-8000, Aarhus-C, Denmark.
Source
Biogerontology. 2004;5(3):169-76
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Base Sequence
DNA Primers
Denmark
HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins - genetics
Health status
Heterozygote
Humans
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Abstract
We have studied the possible association between the -110A > C polymorphism in the promoter region of one of the heat shock protein genes HSP70-1 with human longevity in a cohort of aged Danish twins. This cohort includes individuals aged between 70 and 91 years (mean = 75.6 years), who are categorized according to the presence or absence of various diseases and according to the various, age-related parameters for which a genetic component has already been defined. Four hundred DNA samples from the cohort were genotyped using real-time PCR. Aging phenotypes (diseases, physical and cognitive functioning) were compared with regard to genotype. Of all the aging phenotypes studied, self-rated health and relative self-rated health, which represent an individual's overall sense of physical well-being and which have been shown to be both predictors of survival at older ages and better indicators of future survival than objectively measured health status, were associated with the polymorphism. An association was found between low self-rated health and heterozygosity for -110A > C polymorphism in the promoter region of HSP70-1 in aged Danish twins.
PubMed ID
15190186 View in PubMed
Less detail

Back and neck pain exhibit many common features in old age: a population-based study of 4,486 Danish twins 70-102 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13818
Source
Spine. 2004 Mar 1;29(5):576-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2004
Author
Jan Hartvigsen
Kaare Christensen
Henrik Frederiksen
Author Affiliation
Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense C, Denmark. j.hartvigsen@nikkb.dk
Source
Spine. 2004 Mar 1;29(5):576-80
Date
Mar-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Back Pain - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Neck Pain - epidemiology
Osteoarthritis - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of data comprising 4486 Danish twins 70-102 years of age. OBJECTIVES: To describe the 1-month prevalence of back pain, neck pain, and concurrent back and neck pain and the development of these over time, associations with other health problems, education, smoking, and physical, and mental functioning. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Back pain and neck pain are prevalent symptoms in the population; however, there is little research addressing these conditions in older age groups. METHODS: Extensive interview data on health, lifestyle, social, and educational factors were collected in a nationwide cohort-sequential study of 70+-year-old Danish twins. Data for back pain, neck pain, lifetime prevalence of a comprehensive list of diseases, education, and self-rated health were based on self-report. Physical and mental functioning were measured using validated performance tests. Data including associated factors were analyzed in a cross-sectional analysis for answers given at entry into the study, and longitudinal analysis was performed for participants in all four surveys. RESULTS: The overall 1-month prevalence for back pain only was 15%, for neck pain only 11%, and for concurrent back and neck pain 11%. The prevalence varied negligibly over time and between the age groups, and 63% of participants in all surveys had no episodes or only one episode of back or neck pain. Back pain and neck pain were associated with a number of other diseases and with poorer self-rated health. Back and neck pain sufferers had significantly lower scores on physical but not cognitive functioning. CONCLUSIONS: Back pain and neck pain are common, intermittent symptoms in old age. Back pain and neck pain are associated with general poor physical health in old age.
PubMed ID
15129076 View in PubMed
Less detail

Back pain remains a common symptom in old age. a population-based study of 4486 Danish twins aged 70-102.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71349
Source
Eur Spine J. 2003 Oct;12(5):528-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Jan Hartvigsen
Kaare Christensen
Henrik Frederiksen
Author Affiliation
Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Klosterbakken 20, 5000, Odense C, Denmark. j.hartvigsen@nikkb.dk
Source
Eur Spine J. 2003 Oct;12(5):528-34
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over - physiology - psychology
Aging - pathology - physiology - psychology
Back Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Characteristics
Ulcer - epidemiology
Abstract
Back pain (BP) has been rated among the most important factors affecting physical health status in old age. Yet there is an under-representation of the older population in the BP literature. We present extensive interview data from the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins, dealing with a population-based sample of Danish twins aged 70-102, and describing the 1-month prevalence of BP and the development of BP over time. The associations between BP and education, self-rated health, other health problems, lifestyle factors, and physical and mental function were also investigated. Data were analysed in a cross-sectional analysis for all answers given at entry into the study and in a longitudinal analysis for participants in all four surveys. Associated factors were analysed for the cross-sectional sample using univariate and multivariate analysis accounting for the non-independence of twins in complete pairs. The overall 1-month prevalence of BP was 25% and differed significantly between men and women. The variations in prevalence between the age groups and over time were negligible. The majority of participants in all four surveys had either not experienced BP during the previous month or had done so on one occasion only. Education was not associated with BP. Self-rated health was associated with BP in a significant "dose-response" like pattern. BP was associated with bone and joint disorders, migraine headaches, lung disease, cardiovascular disorders and gastric ulcer, but not neurologic or endocrinologic diseases. BP sufferers had significantly lower scores on physical but not on mental functioning. We conclude that BP is a common symptom in old age; however, the prevalence does not change with increasing age. BP may be part of a more general syndrome of poor health among the old.
PubMed ID
12748896 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms and risk of osteoporotic fractures; a nationwide population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106783
Source
Br J Haematol. 2013 Dec;163(5):603-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Sarah Farmer
Erzsébet Horváth-Puhó
Hanne Vestergaard
Anne Pernille Hermann
Henrik Frederiksen
Author Affiliation
Department of Haematology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Br J Haematol. 2013 Dec;163(5):603-10
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Spontaneous - epidemiology - etiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - etiology
Polycythemia Vera - complications
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Risk
Smoking - epidemiology
Thrombocythemia, Essential - complications
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients with systemic mastocytosis have an increased risk of osteoporosis, however, the risk of osteoporotic fractures among the classic chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (CMPN), including essential thrombocythaemia (ET), polycythaemia vera (PV) and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), is unknown. We conducted a population-based cohort study to determine the risk of osteoporotic fractures among three cohorts of patients with newly diagnosed ET, PV, and CML. Patients were identified in medical registers including all Danish hospitals during 1980-2010 and were followed until first osteoporotic fracture. Fracture risk was compared to cohorts from the general population matched on age, sex and calendar year. We followed 7595 CMPN patients and 338 974 comparison cohort members. We found that the risk of femoral fracture after 5 years was consistently higher than the general population, being 3·01% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2·20-4·10), 4·74% (95%CI: 4·06-5·52) and 4·64% (95%CI: 3·29-6·53) among ET, PV, and CML patients respectively. Adjusted hazard ratio for femoral fracture was increased 1·19-fold (95% CI: 0·94-1·51) for ET patients, 1·82-fold (95% CI: 1·62-2·04) for PV patients, and 2·67-fold (95% CI: 1·97-3·62) for CML patients. We conclude that CMPN patients are at higher risk of osteoporotic fractures than the general population.
PubMed ID
24111669 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms and subsequent cancer risk: a Danish population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130050
Source
Blood. 2011 Dec 15;118(25):6515-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2011
Author
Henrik Frederiksen
Dóra Körmendiné Farkas
Christian Fynbo Christiansen
Hans Carl Hasselbalch
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Allé 43-45, Aarhus, Denmark. hef@dadlnet.dk
Source
Blood. 2011 Dec 15;118(25):6515-20
Date
Dec-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hematologic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Myeloproliferative Disorders - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Polycythemia Vera - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Thrombocythemia, Essential - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms, including essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV), and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), are at increased risk of new hematologic malignancies, but their risk of nonhematologic malignancies remains unknown. In the present study, we assessed the risk of both types of malignancies after an ET, PV, or CML diagnosis. We linked 2 population-based nationwide registries, the Danish National Registry of Patients, covering all Danish hospitals and the Danish Cancer Registry, and assessed subsequent cancer risk in a cohort of all 7229 patients diagnosed with a chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm during 1977-2008. We compared the incidence of subsequent cancer in this cohort with that expected on the basis of cancer incidence in the general population (standardized incidence ratio). Overall, ET, PV, and CML patients were at increased risk of developing both new hematologic and nonhematologic cancers. The standardized incidence ratio for developing a nonhematologic cancer was 1.2 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]): 1.0-1.4) for patients with ET, 1.4 (95% CI: 1.3-1.5) for patients with PV, and 1.6 (95% CI: 1.3-2.0) for patients with CML. We conclude that patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms are at increased risk of developing a new malignant disease.
Notes
Comment In: Blood. 2012 Apr 19;119(16):3861-2; author reply 3862-322517876
PubMed ID
22039256 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do children of long-lived parents age more successfully?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31608
Source
Epidemiology. 2002 May;13(3):334-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Henrik Frederiksen
Matt McGue
Bernard Jeune
David Gaist
Hanne Nybo
Axel Skytthe
James W Vaupel
Kaare Christensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Epidemiology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense. hfrederiksen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Epidemiology. 2002 May;13(3):334-9
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - genetics - physiology
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Genetics, Population
Hand Strength - physiology
Health status
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Nuclear Family
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Long-lived individuals are rare and may be selected in part for the genetic factors that promote successful aging. The children of long-lived parents may therefore age more successfully than the children of short-lived parents. METHODS: We used three major cross-sectional population-based surveys to study the association of parental longevity with successful aging in offspring. The measures of aging were hand-grip strength, cognitive performance (Mini Mental State Examination and a cognitive composite score), self-reported diseases, and self-rated health. RESULTS: For every additional 10 years the parents lived, their children's grip strength increased by 0.32 kg (95% CI = 0.00-0.63), Mini Mental State Examination score by 0.20 points (95% CI = 0.03-0.37), and cognitive composite score by 0.24 points (95% CI = 0.07-0.40). A 10-year increment of parental life was associated with a reduction by approximately 0.20 in the adjusted odds ratio for their children having each of the following conditions: diabetes; hypertension; ischemic heart disease; heart failure; stroke; or fair, poor, or very poor self-rated health. Almost all the effects were seen solely in the cohort of 70+-year-olds, but not among middle-aged or nonagenarian subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Parental life span is positively associated with the children's physical and cognitive functioning and avoidance of some of the common chronic diseases. However, the effects are small and are seen among offspring who are elderly, but not among the middle-aged or the oldest old.
PubMed ID
11964936 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genetic and environmental contributions to back pain in old age: a study of 2,108 danish twins aged 70 and older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63382
Source
Spine. 2004 Apr 15;29(8):897-901; discussion 902
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2004
Author
Jan Hartvigsen
Kaare Christensen
Henrik Frederiksen
Hans Christian Petersen
Hans Christian Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. j.hartvigsen@nikkb.dk
Source
Spine. 2004 Apr 15;29(8):897-901; discussion 902
Date
Apr-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Back Pain - epidemiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Environment
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Humans
Intervertebral Disk Displacement - epidemiology - genetics
Interviews
Joint Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Longitudinal Studies
Lumbosacral Region
Male
Models, Statistical
Odds Ratio
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: Self-reported 1-month prevalence of back pain in older twins assessed at intake in a population-based longitudinal survey. OBJECTIVES: To determine the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to back pain in old age. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: To date, genetic contributions to back pain in old age have not been assessed, to the authors' best knowledge. METHODS: Interview data given at entry into a nationwide cohort-sequential population-based survey of Danish twins aged 70 years and older in 1995, 1997, 1999, and 2001 form the basis of this analysis. Analysis of twin similarity was estimated using probandwise concordance rates, odds ratios, and tetrachoric correlations for back pain. Heritability (proportion of the population variance attributable to genetic variation) was estimated by bivariate probit estimation and adjusted for known significant environmental factors. Odds ratios for known environmental effects were estimated after controlling for age, sex, and genetic effects. RESULTS: Modest and nonsignificant differences between monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs were found for probandwise concordance rates, odds ratios, and tet-rachoric correlations for both men and women. In the bivariate probit estimation, a current or previous diagnosis of osteoporosis, degenerative joint disease, or lumbar disc prolapse was found to significantly affect the risk of back pain. Additive genetic effects explained approximately one fourth of the liability to report back pain in men and none of the occurrence in women. Individual environmental effects were found to explain roughly 75% of the occurrence of back pain in men and 100% in women. CONCLUSIONS: Additive genetic effects are modest contributors to back pain in older men but not in women. A current or previous medical diagnosis of osteoporosis, degenerative joint disease, or lumbar disc prolapse is-strongly associated with back pain, also when genetic factors are controlled for. Because of inherent methodologic issues, this estimate of the genetic influence on back pain in old age is probably conservative.
Notes
Erratum In: Spine. 2005 Mar 15;30(6):710Pedersen, Hans Christian [corrected to Petersen, Hans Christian]
PubMed ID
15082992 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genetic dissection of gene expression observed in whole blood samples of elderly Danish twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63213
Source
Hum Genet. 2005 Jul;117(2-3):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Qihua Tan
Kaare Christensen
Lene Christiansen
Henrik Frederiksen
Lise Bathum
Jesper Dahlgaard
Torben A Kruse
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Genetics (KKA), Odense University Hospital, Sdr. Boulevard 29, 5000 Odense C, Denmark.
Source
Hum Genet. 2005 Jul;117(2-3):267-74
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - blood - genetics
Denmark
Female
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation - genetics - physiology
Humans
Male
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Twins - blood - genetics
Abstract
The microarray technique is an important tool in gene expression analysis to study the activities of thousands of genes measured by their transcript levels under disease or laboratory controlled experimental conditions. Recent studies have suggested a genetic component in the variations of gene expression thus indicating the important role of genetic control over gene activities. In this study, we analyze and report the twin correlation on gene expression in whole blood samples of six female Danish twin pairs aged from 81 to 85 years. We studied the expression phenotype by treating the measured gene expression as a quantitative trait and introducing analytical approaches including the traditional twin methods in population genetics and the multivariate statistical methods. Using this combinatory approach, we were able to estimate and compare the twin correlation on the expression phenotype while accounting for systematic influence in microarray experiments. Analyses on our twin data detected a significant correlation on the expression levels of the actively regulated genes in both monozygotic and dizygotic twins, which is more pronounced in monozygotic twins. Gene ontology analysis has shown that these actively regulated genes are predominantly involved in defense and immune responses against antigenic stimulus. In conclusion, the correlation patterns revealed in our twin data provide evidence of the existence of a heritable mechanism in gene expression regulation persistently functioning even in aged subjects.
PubMed ID
15906095 View in PubMed
Less detail

21 records – page 1 of 3.