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Association of maternal serum concentrations of 2,2', 4,4'5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE) levels with birth weight, gestational age and preterm births in Inuit and European populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141020
Source
Environ Health. 2010;9:56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Bogdan J Wojtyniak
Daniel Rabczenko
Bo A G Jönsson
Valentyna Zvezday
Henning S Pedersen
Lars Rylander
Gunnar Toft
Jan K Ludwicki
Katarzyna Góralczyk
Anna Lesovaya
Lars Hagmar
Jens Peter Bonde
Author Affiliation
Department-Centre of Monitoring and Analyses of Population Health, National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland. bogdan@pzh.gov.pl
Source
Environ Health. 2010;9:56
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Birth Weight - drug effects
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Gestational Age
Greenland
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood - toxicity
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - growth & development
Inuits
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Poland
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Ukraine
Abstract
Epidemiological studies on the association between maternal exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and fetal growth alteration report inconsistent findings which weights in favor of additional studies.
Blood samples were collected from interviewed pregnant women in Greenland (572), Kharkiv (611) and Warsaw (258) and were analyzed for CB-153 and p,p'-DDE by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Data on birth weight, gestational age and preterm birth were obtained for 1322 singleton live births. We examined the association between natural log-transformed serum POPs concentration and birth weight and gestational age using multiple linear regression and the association with prematurity using logistic regression controlling for potential confounding factors.
The median serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE were for Inuit mothers 105.6 and 298.9, for Kharkiv mothers 27.0 and 645.4 and for Warsaw mothers 10.7 and 365.2 ng/g lipids, respectively. Increase in CB-153 concentration by one unit on the log scale in Inuit mothers serum was associated with significant decrease in infant birth weight of -59 g and gestational age by -0.2 week. Decreases observed in the cohorts in Kharkiv (-10 g and -0.1 week) and in Warsaw (-49 g and -0.2 week) were not statistically significant. Increase in p,p'-DDE concentration by one unit on the log scale was associated with a statistically significant decrease in infant birth weight of -39.4 g and -104.3 g and shortening of gestational age of -0.2 week and -0.6 week in the Inuit and Warsaw cohorts, respectively. In the Kharkiv cohort decrease in birth weight (-30.5 g) was not significant, however a shortening of gestational age of -0.2 week per increase in p,p'-DDE concentration by one unit on the log scale was of the borderline significance. There was no significant association between CB-153 and p,p'-DDE concentrations and risk of preterm birth however, in all cohorts the odds ratio was above 1.
In utero exposure to POPs may reduce birth weight and gestational age of newborns however, new insights as to why results vary across studies were not apparent.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20819217 View in PubMed
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Dioxin-like activities in serum across European and Inuit populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169143
Source
Environ Health. 2006;5:14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Manhai Long
Birgitte S Andersen
Christian H Lindh
Lars Hagmar
Aleksander Giwercman
Gian-Carlo Manicardi
Davide Bizzaro
Marcello Spanò
Gunnar Toft
Henning S Pedersen
Valentyna Zvyezday
Jens Peter Bonde
Eva C Bonefeld-Jorgensen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Cellular & Molecular Toxicology, Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. ml@mil.au.dk
Source
Environ Health. 2006;5:14
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Dioxins - blood - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Europe
Humans
Insecticides - blood
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon - blood - metabolism
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - toxicity
Abstract
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides can cause a series of adverse effects on e.g. reproduction in animals and humans, many of which involve the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). The aim of the present study was to compare the integrated serum level of AhR mediated activity among European and Inuit populations, and evaluate whether the activity was associated to the selected POP markers, 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE).
The study included 338 males from Greenland (Inuit's), Sweden, Warsaw (Poland) and Kharkiv (Ukraine). The AhR transactivity of serum extracts alone (AhRag) and competitive AhR activity (AhRcomp) upon co-exposure with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were determined in the lipophilic serum fraction containing the POPs using the AhR mediated luciferase reporter Hepa1.12cR cell assay.
The European groups showed higher median level of AhR-TEQ (TCDD toxic equivalents) compared to the Inuit's, whereas higher incidence of Inuits sample further induced AhRcomp activity. Neither AhRag nor AhR-TEQ were correlated to CB-153 or p,p'-DDE for any of the study groups. Multiple regressions showed a significant heterogeneity of association between the CB-153 and the AhRcomp across the study groups, and accordingly a negative association between AhRcomp and CB-153 was found for the Kharkiv group.
No consistent correlation between AhR activities and two POP markers was found. Although the difference of AhRag between European and Inuit men could not be explained by CB-153 or p,p'-DDE levels alone, we believe that the variation of AhR serum activity reflects different pattern of POP exposure, genetics and/or life style factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16725033 View in PubMed
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Fetal loss and maternal serum levels of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorbiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE) exposure: a cohort study in Greenland and two European populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97018
Source
Environ Health. 2010;9:22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Gunnar Toft
Ane M Thulstrup
Bo A Jönsson
Henning S Pedersen
Jan K Ludwicki
Valentyna Zvezday
Jens P Bonde
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. guntof@rm.dk
Source
Environ Health. 2010;9:22
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In the present study, the aim is to examine the risk of fetal loss related to environmental 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) or 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE) exposure. METHODS: We related LC/MS/MS measurements of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE in serum samples to interview-data on previous fetal loss in populations of pregnant women from Poland, Ukraine and Greenland. RESULTS: In total, 1710 women were interviewed, and 678 of these had at least one previous pregnancy. The risk of ever experiencing a fetal loss increased at higher levels of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE exposure, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.4; confidence interval (CI) (1.1-5.5) for CB-153>200 ng/g lipid compared to 0-25 ng CB-153/g lipid and OR of 2.5 CI (0.9-6.6) for p,p'-DDE>1500 ng/g lipid compared to 0-250 ng DDE/g lipid. However, no clear dose response associations were observed. The results further suggest that high level of organochlorine serum concentrations may be related to repeated loss. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of fetal loss may increase at higher levels of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE exposure, although lack of dose response and inconsistencies between countries did not allow for firm conclusions.
PubMed ID
20459724 View in PubMed
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Impact of PCB and p,p'-DDE contaminants on human sperm Y:X chromosome ratio: studies in three European populations and the Inuit population in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169426
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 May;114(5):718-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Tarmo Tiido
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Bo A G Jönsson
Yvonne Lundberg Giwercman
Henning S Pedersen
Bogdan Wojtyniak
Jan K Ludwicki
Vladimir Lesovoy
Valentyna Zvyezday
Marcello Spano
Gian-Carlo Manicardi
Davide Bizzaro
Eva C Bonefeld-Jørgensen
Gunnar Toft
Jens Peter Bonde
Lars Rylander
Lars Hagmar
Aleksander Giwercman
Author Affiliation
Molecular Reproductive Medicine Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Fertility Centre, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. tarmo.tiido@med.lu.se
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 May;114(5):718-24
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosomes, Human, X
Chromosomes, Human, Y
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - toxicity
Europe
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Greenland
Humans
Inuits - genetics
Male
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Spermatozoa - drug effects - ultrastructure
Abstract
Recent studies indicate that persistent organohalogen pollutants (POPs) may contribute to sex ratio changes in offspring of exposed populations. Our aim in the present study was to investigate whether exposure to 2,2 ,4,4 ,5,5 -hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-153) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (p,p -DDE) affects sperm Y:X chromosome distribution.
We obtained semen and blood for analysis of PCB-153 and p,p -DDE levels from 547 men from Sweden, Greenland, Poland (Warsaw), and Ukraine (Kharkiv), with regionally different levels of POP exposure. The proportion of Y- and X-chromosome-bearing sperm in the semen samples was determined by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.
Swedish and Greenlandic men had on average significantly higher proportions of Y sperm (in both cohorts, 51.2%) and correspondingly higher lipid-adjusted concentrations of PCB-153 (260 ng/g and 350 ng/g, respectively) compared with men from Warsaw (50.3% and 22 ng/g) and Kharkiv (50.7% and 54 ng/g). In the Swedish cohort, log-transformed PCB-153 and log-transformed p,p -DDE variables were significantly positively associated with Y-chromosome fractions (p-values 0.04 and
Notes
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PubMed ID
16675426 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inter-population variations in concentrations, determinants of and correlations between 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE): a cross-sectional study of 3161 men and women from Inuit and European populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3408
Source
Environ Health. 2005;4:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Bo A G Jönsson
Lars Rylander
Christian Lindh
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Aleksander Giwercman
Gunnar Toft
Henning S Pedersen
Jan K Ludwicki
Katarzyna Góralczyk
Valentyna Zvyezday
Marcello Spanò
Davide Bizzaro
Eva C Bonefeld-Jörgensen
Gian Carlo Manicardi
Jens Peter Bonde
Lars Hagmar
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. bo_a.jonsson@med.lu.se
Source
Environ Health. 2005;4:27
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The study is part of a collaborative project (Inuendo), aiming to assess the impact of dietary persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) on human fertility. The aims with the present study are to analyze inter-population variations in serum concentrations of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE), to assess inter-population variations in biomarker correlations, and to evaluate the relative impact of different determinants for the inter-individual variations in POP-biomarkers. METHOD: In study populations of 3161 adults, comprising Greenlandic Inuits, Swedish fishermen and their wives, and inhabitants from Warsaw, Poland and Kharkiv, Ukraine, serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE, were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The median serum concentrations of CB-153 were for male and female Inuits 200 and 110, for Swedish fishermen 190 and their wives 84, for Kharkiv men and women 44 and 27, and for Warsaw men and women 17 and 11 ng/g lipids, respectively. The median serum concentrations of p,p'-DDE were for Kharkiv men and women 930 and 650, for male and female Inuits 560 and 300, for Warsaw men and women 530 and 380, and for Swedish fishermen 240 and their wives 140 ng/g lipids, respectively. The correlation coefficients between CB-153 and p,p'-DDE varied between 0.19 and 0.92, with the highest correlation among Inuits and the lowest among men from Warsaw. Men had averagely higher serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE, and there were positive associations between age and the POP-biomarkers, whereas the associations with BMI and smoking were inconsistent. Dietary seafood was of importance only in the Inuit and Swedish populations. CONCLUSION: CB-153 concentrations were much higher in Inuits and Swedish fishermen's populations than in the populations from Eastern Europe, whereas the pattern was different for p,p'-DDE showing highest concentrations in the Kharkiv population. The correlations between the POP-biomarkers varied considerably between the populations, underlining that exposure sources differ and that the choice of representative biomarkers of overall POP exposure has to be based on an analysis of the specific exposure situation for each population. Age and gender were consistent determinants of serum POPs; seafood was of importance only in the Inuit and Swedish populations.
PubMed ID
16283941 View in PubMed
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Lifestyle, reproductive factors and food intake in Greenlandic pregnant women: the ACCEPT - sub-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267862
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:29469
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
  1 document  
Author
Ane-Kersti Skaarup Knudsen
Manhai Long
Henning S Pedersen
Eva Cecilie Bonefeld-Jørgensen
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:29469
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
File Size
677738
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology
Arctic Regions
Body mass index
Breast Feeding
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Eating
Female
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Reproductive history
Residence Characteristics
Smoking/epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In the past decades, Greenland has changed from a hunter society to a more western lifestyle, causing less intake of traditional food, such as marine mammals, fish and seabirds. These changes in the living conditions and food habits might impact the maternal health in Greenland.
To describe lifestyle, reproductive factors and food intake in Greenlandic pregnant women, and to assess possible age and geographical differences.
Cross-sectional study of 189 Greenlandic pregnant women. Inclusion criteria were =18 years and lived >50% of their life in Greenland. Data were collected in 2010-2011, and information was obtained from lifestyle and food frequency questionnaires. Two age groups for comparison were given for the pregnant women (25.0 kg/m(2), 46.3% were current smokers in the beginning of their pregnancy and few participants consumed alcohol during pregnancy. Women 50% in North, South and West had a higher alcohol intake during pregnancy. Women in North had the fewest breastfeeding plans. Women in Disko Bay had the lowest intake of terrestrial species. No significant geographical differences were found for intake of marine mammals or seabirds.
The present study found relatively high BMI level and high smoking frequency in Greenlandic pregnant women. Age and region differences were found for alcohol consumption, breastfeeding plans and food intake profile. Further research is needed to implement relevant maternal health intervention programs in Greenland.
PubMed ID
26582354 View in PubMed
Documents
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Polyunsaturated fatty acids and calcaneal ultrasound parameters among Inuit women from Nuuk (Greenland): a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113250
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20988
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexandra-Cristina Paunescu
Pierre Ayotte
Eric Dewailly
Sylvie Dodin
Henning S Pedersen
Gert Mulvad
Suzanne Côté
Author Affiliation
Axe Santé Publique et Pratiques Optimales en Santé, Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, Québec, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20988
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Body Weights and Measures
Bone and Bones - physiology
Calcaneus - ultrasonography
Chromatography, Gas
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Fatty Acids, Omega-6 - blood
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - blood
Female
Fishes
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Abstract
The traditional diet of Inuit people comprises large amounts of fish and marine mammals that are rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Results from in vitro studies, laboratory animal experiments and population studies suggest that omega-3 PUFA intake and a high omega-3/omega-6 ratio exert a positive effect on bone health.
This longitudinal study was conducted to examine the relationship between omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA status and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters in Greenlandic Inuit women.
The study included 118 Inuit women from Nuuk (Greenland), aged 49-64 years, whose QUS parameters measured at baseline (year 2000), along with PUFA status and covariates, and follow-up QUS measurements 2 years later (year 2002). QUS parameters [speed of sound (SOS); broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA)] were measured at the right calcaneus with a water-bath Lunar Achilles instrument. Omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA contents of erythrocyte membrane phospholipids were measured after transmethylation by gas chromatography coupled with a flame ionization detector. Relationships between QUS parameters and different PUFAs were studied in multiple linear regression models.
Increasing values of EPA, DHA and the omega-3/omega-6 PUFA ratio were associated with increased BUA values measured at follow-up (year 2002). These associations were still present in models adjusted for several confounders and covariates. We found little evidence of associations between PUFAs and SOS values.
The omega-3 PUFA intake from marine food consumption seems to have a positive effect on bone intrinsic quality and strength, as revealed by higher BUA values in this group of Greenlandic Inuit women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23750339 View in PubMed
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Remarkably low incidence of hypospadias in Greenland despite high exposure to endocrine disrupters; possible protective effect of androgen receptor genotype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169834
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2006 May;16(5):375-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Yvonne L Giwercman
Knud Erik Kleist
Aleksander Giwercman
Charlotte Giwercman
Gunnar Toft
Jens-Peter Bonde
Henning S Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Wallenberg Laboratory, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. Yvonne.Giwercman@med.lu.se
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2006 May;16(5):375-7
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Endocrine Disruptors - toxicity
Genotype
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypospadias - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Incidence
Male
Receptors, Androgen - genetics
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Endocrine disrupters, such as persistent organohalogen pollutants (POPs) may cause hypospadias, which is a common congenital anomaly in males, affecting 0.2-0.7%. We hypothesized that hypospadias incidence would be high among Greenlanders, who are one of the most POP exposed populations on earth through consumption of contaminated sea mammals. Interestingly, among the 11 076 boys born in Greenland 1982-2002, only two cases of hypospadias were noted (incidence 0.02%; 95% CI: 0.002-0.06). Normal male sexual differentiation is dependent on the androgen receptor (AR). AR function is regulated by polymorphic repeats of CAG and GGN trinucleotide bases. In Greenland 85% were carriers of GGN=23, which in a previous report was less frequent in patients with hypospadias than in the general population. This finding indicates that AR genotype could contribute to a genetic predisposition in Greenlanders, who despite one of the worlds highest body burden of POPs, seem to be protected from hypospadias.
PubMed ID
16609370 View in PubMed
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Semen quality in relation to xenohormone and dioxin-like serum activity among Inuits and three European populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159479
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Dec;115 Suppl 1:15-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Gunnar Toft
Manhai Long
Tanja Krüger
Philip S Hjelmborg
Jens Peter Bonde
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Ewa Tyrkiel
Lars Hagmar
Aleksander Giwercman
Marcello Spanó
Davide Bizzaro
Henning S Pedersen
Vladymir Lesovoy
Jan K Ludwicki
Eva C Bonefeld-Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. gutos@as.aaa.dk
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Dec;115 Suppl 1:15-20
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dioxins - blood
Endocrine Disruptors - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Europe
European Continental Ancestry Group
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Receptors, Androgen - drug effects - metabolism
Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon - drug effects - metabolism
Receptors, Estrogen - drug effects - metabolism
Semen - drug effects
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility - drug effects
Xenobiotics - toxicity
Abstract
Semen quality in humans may be influenced by exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds.
We analyzed associations between semen characteristics and serum xenoestrogen receptor (XER), xenoandrogen receptor (XAR), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transactivity. XER and XAR activity were measured in serum samples cleared for endogenous steroid hormones and AhR activity in raw lipophilic serum extracts free of proteins.
All together, 319 men from Warsaw (Poland), Greenland, Kharkiv (Ukraine), and Sweden provided semen and blood samples. No strong and consistent associations between xenobiotic activity and semen quality measures were observed in the four populations. However, when the data were combined across populations sperm concentration increased 40% per unit increase in XER activity [95% confidence interval (CI), 1-79%] in the subgroup with XER activity below the reference level. Among subjects with XER activity above the reference level an increase of 14% (95% CI, 2-28%) was found. Furthermore, an increase of 10% motile sperm per unit increase in XER activity below reference level (95% CI, 0.2-20) was found. We are unable to exclude that the associations are chance findings.
Alteration of XER, XAR, or AhR transactivity within the range found in serum from the general European and Inuit population seems not to markedly deteriorate sperm cell concentration, motility, or morphology in adult men.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18174945 View in PubMed
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Serum levels of perfluorinated compounds and sperm Y:X chromosome ratio in two European populations and in Inuit from Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120046
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2012 Dec;34(4):644-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Linus Kvist
Yvonne Lundberg Giwercman
Bo A G Jönsson
Christian H Lindh
Jens-Peter Bonde
Gunnar Toft
Pawel Strucinski
Henning S Pedersen
Valentyna Zvyezday
Aleksander Giwercman
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Molecular Genetic Reproductive Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. Linus.Kvist@med.lu.se
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2012 Dec;34(4):644-50
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Caprylates - blood
Chromosomes, Human, X
Chromosomes, Human, Y
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Fluorocarbons - blood
Greenland
Humans
Inuits - genetics
Male
Spermatozoa
Abstract
This study investigated whether perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), which exhibit reproductive toxicity in experimental animals, affect sperm sex chromosome ratio. The Y:X ratio was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Serum concentrations of PFOA and PFOS were measured in 607 men from Greenland, Poland and Ukraine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Data was analyzed by linear and nonlinear regression. We observed no associations between PFOA and Y:X ratio (p=0.845 in a linear model, p=0.296 in a nonlinear model). A positive nonlinear association between PFOS and Y:X ratio was observed (p=0.016), with no association in a linear model (p=0.118). Analyzing the populations separately, a negative trend between categorized PFOS exposure and Y:X ratio was observed for the Inuit (B=-0.002, p=0.044). In conclusion, there was a negative trend between Y:X ratio and PFOS in the Inuit, while there was no association between PFOA and the Y:X ratio in adult men.
PubMed ID
23044208 View in PubMed
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