Skip header and navigation

Refine By

25 records – page 1 of 3.

Association of parental history of type 2 diabetes with age, lifestyle, anthropometric factors, and clinical severity at type 2 diabetes diagnosis: results from the DD2 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278529
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2016 Mar;32(3):308-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Elisabeth Svensson
Klara Berencsi
Simone Sander
Anil Mor
Jørgen Rungby
Jens Steen Nielsen
Søren Friborg
Ivan Brandslund
Jens Sandahl Christiansen
Allan Vaag
Henning Beck-Nielsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Reimar Wernich Thomsen
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2016 Mar;32(3):308-15
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Weight Gain
Abstract
We investigated whether parental history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with age, lifestyle, anthropometric factors, and clinical severity at the time of T2D diagnosis.
We conducted a cross-sectional study based on the Danish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes cohort. We examined the prevalence ratios (PR) of demographic, lifestyle, anthropometric, and clinical factors according to parental history, using Poisson regression adjusting for age and gender.
Of 2825 T2D patients, 34% (n?=?964) had a parental history of T2D. Parental history was associated with younger age at diagnosis [adjusted (a)PR 1.66, 95% confidence interval: 1.19, 2.31) for age
PubMed ID
26408959 View in PubMed
Less detail

Detection of hypoglycemia associated EEG changes during sleep in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122500
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2012 Oct;98(1):91-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Lena Sønder Snogdal
Lars Folkestad
Rasmus Elsborg
Line Sofie Remvig
Henning Beck-Nielsen
Birger Thorsteinsson
Poul Jennum
Michaela Gjerstad
Claus B Juhl
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. lss@dadlnet.dk
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2012 Oct;98(1):91-7
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Awareness
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Clinical Alarms
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood
Electroencephalography
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hypoglycemia - blood
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Insulin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods
Predictive value of tests
Sleep
Time Factors
Abstract
Nocturnal hypoglycemia is a feared complication to insulin treated diabetes. Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) increases the risk of severe hypoglycemia. EEG changes are demonstrated during daytime hypoglycemia. In this explorative study, we test the hypothesis that specific hypoglycemia-associated EEG-changes occur during sleep and are detectable in time for the patient to take action.
Ten patients with type 1 diabetes (duration 23.7 years) with IAH were exposed to insulin-induced hypoglycemia during the daytime and during sleep. EEG was recorded and analyzed real-time by an automated multi-parameter algorithm. Participants received an auditory alarm when EEG changes met a predefined threshold, and were instructed to consume a meal.
Seven out of eight participants developed hypoglycemia-associated EEG changes during daytime. During sleep, nine out of ten developed EEG changes (mean BG 2.0 mmol/l). Eight were awakened by the alarm. Four corrected hypoglycemia (mean BG 2.2 mmol/l), while four (mean BG 1.9 mmol/l) received glucose infusion. Two had false alarms. EEG-changes occurred irrespective of sleep stage. Post hoc improvement indicates the possibility of earlier detection of hypoglycemia.
Continuous EEG monitoring and automated real-time analysis may constitute a novel technique for a hypoglycemia alarm in patients with IAH.
PubMed ID
22809714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of troglitazone in young first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47308
Source
Diabetes Care. 2004 Jan;27(1):148-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Klaus Levin
Ole Hother-Nielsen
Jan Erik Henriksen
Henning Beck-Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Endocrinology M, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. kl22@bbh.hosp.dk
Source
Diabetes Care. 2004 Jan;27(1):148-54
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Chromans - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - genetics
Family
Glucose Clamp Technique
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hyperinsulinism
Hypoglycemic Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Insulin - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Lipids - blood
Obesity - physiopathology
Oxidation-Reduction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Thiazolidinediones - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Insulin resistance is a key characteristic of first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes. We therefore treated young, glucose-tolerant relatives with the insulin action enhancer troglitazone in order to determine the effects on insulin sensitivity, glucose metabolism, and glycogen synthase activity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Relatives were randomized in a double-blind manner and treated for 12 weeks with either 200 mg troglitazone or placebo. Before and after treatment, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (40 mU. m(-2). min(-1)) were performed, including 3-(3)H glucose infusion, glycolytic flux calculations, indirect calorimetry, and muscle biopsies. RESULTS: Twelve relatives received troglitazone and 12 placebo (aged 30.8 +/- 2.0 vs. 30.3 +/- 1.6 years, BMI 29.6 +/- 0.8 vs. 30.5 +/- 1.3 kg/m(2); means +/- SE). Area under the curve (AUC) for plasma glucose at the second OGTT was unchanged after troglitazone. In contrast, troglitazone reduced fasting (from 70.3 +/- 6.9 to 52.2 +/- 5.8 vs. 73.6 +/- 11.0 to 73.3 +/- 6.5 pmol/l, P
PubMed ID
14693981 View in PubMed
Less detail

Encouraging structured personalised diabetes care in general practice. A 6-year follow-up study of process and patient outcomes in newly diagnosed patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47379
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2003 Jun;21(2):89-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Lars J Hansen
Niels de Fine Olivarius
Volkert Siersma
Henning Beck-Nielsen
Poul A Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Central Research Unit and Department of General Practice, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. L.Hansen@gpract.ku.dk
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2003 Jun;21(2):89-95
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Family Practice - organization & administration
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Physician's Practice Patterns
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Self Care
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of diabetes care achieved on the process and outcomes of care in the context of a multifaceted intervention directed at general practitioners (GPs) encouraging regular follow-up and individualised goal-setting. DESIGN: A 6-year follow-up study. SETTING: A total of 243 Danish GPs and a population-based sample of 729 newly diagnosed, predominantly type 2 diabetic patients participated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Questionnaires and laboratory assessments were used to determine the proportion of patients reviewed regularly, and their pharmacological treatment and risk factors. RESULTS: During the study, the proportion of patients who had an annual clinical examination decreased from 100% to 77%. The proportion given oral anti-diabetic agents or insulin increased from 43% to 71%. Median glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) dropped in the 2nd year to 7.7% (normal range 5.4-7.4%), after which it increased gradually, but remained on average at 1.3% above the upper limit of the normal range. Median blood pressure (systolic/diastolic), total cholesterols and fasting triglycerides were maintained at 145-150/81-85 mmHg, 6.0-6.2 mmol/l and 1.66-1.96 mmol/l, respectively. Initial weight loss was partly regained over 6 years. CONCLUSION: Among centrally supported GPs, most patients were regularly reviewed and obtained acceptable levels of risk factors for at least 6 years, although glycaemic control progressively deteriorated after an initial drop to near-normal average level.
PubMed ID
12877371 View in PubMed
Less detail

Glucose tolerance is associated with differential expression of microRNAs in skeletal muscle: results from studies of twins with and without type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266504
Source
Diabetologia. 2015 Feb;58(2):363-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Jette Bork-Jensen
Camilla Scheele
Daniel V Christophersen
Emma Nilsson
Martin Friedrichsen
Denise S Fernandez-Twinn
Louise G Grunnet
Thomas Litman
Kim Holmstrøm
Birgitte Vind
Kurt Højlund
Henning Beck-Nielsen
Jørgen Wojtaszewski
Susan E Ozanne
Bente K Pedersen
Pernille Poulsen
Allan Vaag
Source
Diabetologia. 2015 Feb;58(2):363-73
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - metabolism
Down-Regulation
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Insulin - metabolism
Male
MicroRNAs - metabolism
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism
Signal Transduction
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
We aimed to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with type 2 diabetes and risk of developing the disease in skeletal muscle biopsies from phenotypically well-characterised twins.
We measured muscle miRNA levels in monozygotic (MZ) twins discordant for type 2 diabetes using arrays. Further investigations of selected miRNAs included target prediction, pathway analysis, silencing in cells and association analyses in a separate cohort of 164 non-diabetic MZ and dizygotic twins. The effects of elevated glucose and insulin levels on miRNA expression were examined, and the effect of low birthweight (LBW) was studied in rats.
We identified 20 miRNAs that were downregulated in MZ twins with diabetes compared with their non-diabetic co-twins. Differences for members of the miR-15 family (miR-15b and miR-16) were the most statistically significant, and these miRNAs were predicted to influence insulin signalling. Indeed, miR-15b and miR-16 levels were associated with levels of key insulin signalling proteins, miR-15b was associated with the insulin receptor in non-diabetic twins and knockdown of miR-15b/miR-16 in myocytes changed the levels of insulin signalling proteins. LBW in twins and undernutrition during pregnancy in rats were, in contrast to overt type 2 diabetes, associated with increased expression of miR-15b and/or miR-16. Elevated glucose and insulin suppressed miR-16 expression in vitro.
Type 2 diabetes is associated with non-genetic downregulation of several miRNAs in skeletal muscle including miR-15b and miR-16, potentially targeting insulin signalling. The paradoxical findings in twins with overt diabetes and twins at increased risk of the disease underscore the complexity of the regulation of muscle insulin signalling in glucose homeostasis.
Notes
Cites: Cell. 2004 Jan 23;116(2):281-9714744438
Cites: Diabetologia. 2008 Jul;51(7):1100-1018504548
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 Jan 25;322(4):223-82403659
Cites: Diabetologia. 1992 Jan;35(1):80-81541385
Cites: Diabetologia. 1994 Feb;37(2):150-48163048
Cites: J Clin Invest. 1995 Feb;95(2):690-87860750
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Feb 15;143(4):323-328633616
Cites: Diabetologia. 1997 Apr;40(4):439-469112021
Cites: Nat Genet. 1999 Feb;21(2):230-59988280
Cites: Diabetologia. 1999 Jul;42(7):898-910440137
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2003 Jan 22;19(2):185-9312538238
Cites: Methods Mol Biol. 2003;224:111-3612710670
Cites: PLoS One. 2009;4(8):e657519668377
Cites: Nat Genet. 2009 Oct;41(10):1110-519734900
Cites: Diabetes. 2009 Nov;58(11):2555-6419720801
Cites: Diabetes. 2010 Jan;59(1):89-9719833885
Cites: Diabetes. 2010 Apr;59(4):1108-1220107106
Cites: Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Nov;299(5):E752-6320739510
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2011 Jan;91(1):94-10021146880
Cites: Cell Cycle. 2011 Mar 1;10(5):751-921311220
Cites: Cell. 2011 Sep 30;147(1):81-9421962509
Cites: Cell Death Differ. 2012 Jun;19(6):1003-1222223106
Cites: Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 1999 Aug;61(2):89-9510509863
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2004 Nov;114(10):1518-2615546003
Cites: Diabetes. 2005 Jan;54(1):275-8315616039
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2005 Feb;288(2):R368-7315514105
Cites: Cell. 2005 Jan 14;120(1):15-2015652477
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2005 May 1;21(9):2067-7515657102
Cites: Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2006 Feb;7(2):85-9616493415
Cites: Diabetes. 2006 Aug;55(8):2392-716873706
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2006 Aug;291(2):R429-3616914429
Cites: Carcinogenesis. 2007 Mar;28(3):545-5216952910
Cites: Mol Cell. 2007 Jul 6;27(1):91-10517612493
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2007 Oct 15;23(20):2700-717720982
Cites: Genome Res. 2009 Jan;19(1):92-10518955434
Cites: Nat Protoc. 2009;4(1):44-5719131956
Cites: Diabetes. 2009 Jun;58(6):1350-519336677
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e5130223251491
Cites: Cell Signal. 2014 Feb;26(2):323-3124216610
Cites: Diabetes. 2001 Dec;50(12):2770-811723060
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2002 Jan 1;30(1):207-1011752295
Cites: Diabetologia. 2002 Dec;45(12):1649-5712488954
Cites: Science. 2007 Dec 21;318(5858):1931-418048652
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1980 Jun 30;142(27):1743-97466931
PubMed ID
25403480 View in PubMed
Less detail

Heritability of insulin secretion, peripheral and hepatic insulin action, and intracellular glucose partitioning in young and old Danish twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47139
Source
Diabetes. 2005 Jan;54(1):275-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Pernille Poulsen
Klaus Levin
Inge Petersen
Kaare Christensen
Henning Beck-Nielsen
Allan Vaag
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center, Niels Steensens Vej 2, DK-2820 Gentofte, Denmark. pepn@steno.dk
Source
Diabetes. 2005 Jan;54(1):275-83
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Denmark
Female
Glucose - metabolism
Glucose Clamp Technique
Glycolysis - genetics
Humans
Insulin - genetics - secretion
Liver - growth & development - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The etiology of type 2 diabetes is multifactorial, including genetic as well as pre- and postnatal factors that influence several different defects of glucose homeostasis, primarily in muscle, beta-cells, and liver. In the present twin study, we report heritability estimates (h(2)) for measures of insulin secretion, insulin resistance, hepatic glucose production (HGP), and intracellular glucose partitioning using gold standard methods (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique, tritiated glucose infusion, indirect calorimetry, and intravenous glucose tolerance testing) among 110 younger (22-31 years of age) and 86 older (57-66 years of age) twins. To obtain a valid estimate of beta-cell function, insulin secretion was adjusted for the individual degree of insulin action (disposition index). In both age-groups there was a major genetic component in the etiology of insulin secretion that was statistically significantly higher among older twins (young h(2) = 0.75 [0.55-0.86] and old h(2) = 0.84 [0.69-0.92], P
PubMed ID
15616039 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of Glycemic Control on Risk of Infections in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285668
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Jul 15;186(2):227-236
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2017
Author
Anil Mor
Olaf M Dekkers
Jens S Nielsen
Henning Beck-Nielsen
Henrik T Sørensen
Reimar W Thomsen
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Jul 15;186(2):227-236
Date
Jul-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Community Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - epidemiology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications - epidemiology
Incidence
Infection - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Infections are a major clinical challenge for type 2 diabetes patients, but little is known about the impact of glycemic control. We used Cox regression analyses to examine the association between baseline and time-varying hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values and development of community antiinfective-agent-treated and hospital-treated infections in 69,318 patients with type 2 diabetes diagnosed between 2000 and 2012 in Northern Denmark. Incidence rates were 394/1,000 patient-years for community-treated infections and 63/1,000 patient-years for hospital-treated infections. The adjusted hazard ratios for community-treated infection at an HbA1c level of =10.50%, as compared with 5.50%-
PubMed ID
28459981 View in PubMed
Less detail

Increased metabolic risk in adolescent offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes: the EPICOM study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270825
Source
Diabetologia. 2015 Jul;58(7):1454-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Zuzana Vlachová
Birgitte Bytoft
Sine Knorr
Tine D Clausen
Rikke Beck Jensen
Elisabeth R Mathiesen
Kurt Højlund
Per Ovesen
Henning Beck-Nielsen
Claus H Gravholt
Peter Damm
Dorte M Jensen
Source
Diabetologia. 2015 Jul;58(7):1454-63
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Male
Metabolic Diseases - epidemiology
Mothers
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy in Diabetics
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
We aimed to investigate metabolic risk factors, insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in adolescent offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes compared with offspring of non-diabetic mothers.
During 1993-1999, pregnancies of women with type 1 diabetes in Denmark were prospectively reported to a central registry in the Danish Diabetes Association. Data included information on maternal demography, diabetes status and pregnancy outcome. We invited 746 eligible children from this cohort (index offspring) to a follow-up examination. Control offspring were identified through The Danish Central Office of Civil Registration and matched with respect to date of birth, sex and postal code. Anthropometric measurements and blood sampling for metabolic characterisation, including an oral glucose tolerance test, were performed.
We examined 278 index offspring (mean age 16.7 years; range 13.0-19.8 years) and 303 control offspring (mean age 16.8 years; range 13.5-20.4 years). Index offspring had higher BMI SD score (0.44: 95% CI 0.21, 0.66) compared with controls, after adjustments for pubertal development and maternal pre-pregnancy BMI. Furthermore, index offspring had a higher prevalence of components included in metabolic syndrome and prediabetes (impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance), with reduced insulin sensitivity and relative insulin secretion deficiency, compared with controls. Maternal HbA1c levels in pregnancy were not directly associated with offspring metabolic outcomes.
Adolescent offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes had a less favourable metabolic profile and higher frequency of prediabetes than the background population. Significant associations between these outcomes and maternal HbA1c levels in pregnancy could not be demonstrated.
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01559181.
PubMed ID
25924986 View in PubMed
Less detail

Incretin-based therapy and risk of acute pancreatitis: a nationwide population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268369
Source
Diabetes Care. 2015 Jun;38(6):1089-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Reimar Wernich Thomsen
Lars Pedersen
Niels Møller
Johnny Kahlert
Henning Beck-Nielsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
Diabetes Care. 2015 Jun;38(6):1089-98
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors - adverse effects
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 - antagonists & inhibitors
Hospitalization
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects
Incretins - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - chemically induced
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate whether the use of incretin-based drugs (GLP-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 [DPP4] inhibitors) is associated with acute pancreatitis.
The study was a nationwide population-based case-control study using medical databases in Denmark. Participants were 12,868 patients with a first-time hospitalization for acute pancreatitis between 2005 and 2012 and a population of 128,680 matched control subjects. The main outcome measure was the odds ratio (OR) for acute pancreatitis associated with different antihyperglycemic drugs. We adjusted for history of gallstones, alcoholism, obesity, and other pancreatitis-associated comorbidities and medications.
A total of 89 pancreatitis patients (0.69%) and 684 control subjects (0.53%) were ever users of incretins. The crude OR for acute pancreatitis among incretin users was 1.36 (95% CI 1.08-1.69), while it was 1.44 (95% CI 1.34-1.54) among users of other antihyperglycemic drugs. After confounder adjustment, the risk of acute pancreatitis was not increased among incretin users (OR 0.95 [95% CI 0.75-1.21]), including DPP4 inhibitor users (OR 1.04 [95% CI 0.80-1.37]) or GLP-1 receptor agonist users (OR 0.82 [95% CI 0.54-1.23]), or among nonincretin antihyperglycemic drug users (OR 1.05 [95% CI 0.98-1.13]), compared with nonusers of any antihyperglycemic drugs. Findings were similar in current versus ever drug users and in patients with pancreatitis risk factors. The adjusted OR comparing incretin-based therapy with other antihyperglycemic therapy internally while also adjusting for diabetes duration and complications was 0.97 (95% CI 0.76-1.23).
Our findings suggest that the use of incretin-based drugs appears not to be associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis.
Notes
Comment In: Diabetes Care. 2015 Jul;38(7):e106-726106231
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 2015 Jun 16;162(12):JC1226075777
Comment In: Diabetes Care. 2015 Jul;38(7):e108-926106232
PubMed ID
25633664 View in PubMed
Less detail

The influence of zygosity status on blood pressure and on lipid profiles in male and female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63704
Source
J Hypertens. 2002 Apr;20(4):645-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Pernille Poulsen
Allan Vaag
Henning Beck-Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Odense University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark. p.poulsen@winsloew.ou.dk
Source
J Hypertens. 2002 Apr;20(4):645-9
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Pressure - genetics
Cholesterol - blood
Comparative Study
Denmark
Diseases in Twins - genetics
Female
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - genetics
Hypertension - genetics
Hypertriglyceridemia - genetics
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Triglycerides - blood
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the influence of zygosity on blood pressure and serum lipid concentrations among male and female twins. SETTING: Department of Endocrinology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 125 monozygotic and 178 dizygotic twin pairs aged 55-74 years of age, ascertained from The Danish Twin Register. DESIGN : Population-based cross-sectional study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Blood pressure and serum lipid concentrations. RESULTs: The prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia were higher among monozygotic compared with dizygotic twins, whereas the prevalence of hypertension was similar. The level of triglycerides [0.28 (0.44) versus 0.18 (0.41), P = 0.01] and total cholesterol [1.82 (0.17) versus 1.78 (0.19), P = 0.03] were significantly higher in monozygotic compared with dizygotic twins. Systolic blood pressure was non-significantly higher among monozygotic twins (136.8 (21.3) versus 134.1 (19.6), P = 0.10). When comparing monozygotic and dizygotic twins within each sex group, the difference in triglyceride level was only apparent among male twins and the differences in systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol were only seen among female twins. Birth weight as determined in a subgroup of the population was similar in monozygotic and dizygotic twins. CONCLUSIONS: Zygosity status per se influences fasting serum triglycerides and total-cholesterol and to some extent systolic blood pressure in twins, supporting an influence of an intrauterine component on lipid profiles. The influence is independent of birth weight and seems to be sex-specific.
PubMed ID
11910299 View in PubMed
Less detail

25 records – page 1 of 3.