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Nervous control of shivering. X. Role of the Fields of Forel in shivering.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298757
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-27. 12 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1961
  1 document  
Author
Freeman, Walter J.
Stuart, Douglas G.
Hemingway, Allan
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-27. 12 p.
Date
October 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
938782
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Cats
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Shivering
Body temperature
Abstract
It is known that neurons in the nucleus of Forel and the central tegmental fasciculus are active during shivering. In this study, bilateral lesions were placed in either of these 2 regions in 35 cats. Their ability to maintain normal rectal temperature in response to external cooling was tested at intervals up to 3 weeks or more. In 10 of these cats, a test was made of the ability to raise rectal temperature from 32° C to normal by shivering before and after the lesions. In six cats, quantitative measures of oxygen consumption rates were made during cold stress before and after the lesions. The results indicate that the lesions did not impair the shivering response, except in cats with postoperative respiratory infections or diminished food intake, and then only after the development of cachexia.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.60-27
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