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Adherence of Finnish people with glaucoma to treatment plans and connected factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139427
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Feb;70(1):79-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Jaana Lunnela
Maria Kääriäinen
Helvi Kyngäs
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa, Helsinki, Finland. jaana.lunnela@netti.fi
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Feb;70(1):79-89
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Utilization
Female
Finland
Glaucoma - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Office Visits
Patient compliance
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Self Care
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to describe the adherence of Finnish people with glaucoma to prescribed treatment plans, the factors connected to adherence and to produce knowledge for developing effective interventions to improve adherence to treatment plans.
This was a cross-sectional study.
The data (n = 249) were collected at one point in time from Finnish adults diagnosed with glaucoma with a questionnaire covering adherence to treatment. These patients used glaucoma medication and had follow-up appointments with ophthalmologists.
Sixty-seven percent (n = 166) of the patients with glaucoma were very adherent to the prescribed treatment plan in terms of self-care, treatment and follow-up visits. Almost all were very adherent to medical care (97%, n = 242). More than half of those who had received information from physicians and nurses were very adherent to treatment (66%, n = 163). Two factors, support from physicians and nurses (p
PubMed ID
21062571 View in PubMed
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Adherence to health regimens among frequent attenders of Finnish healthcare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280267
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:30726
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Sari Hirsikangas
Outi Kanste
Juha Korpelainen
Helvi Kyngäs
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:30726
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Self Care - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Abstract
The aim of the study was to describe adherence to health regimens and the factors associated with it among adult frequent attenders (FAs).
This was a cross-sectional study. The study sample consisted of 462 healthcare FAs in 7 municipal health centres in northern Finland. An FA is a person who has had 8 or more outpatient visits to a GP (in a health centre) or 4 or more outpatient visits to a university hospital during 1 year. The main outcome was self-reported adherence to health regimens.
Of the FAs, 82% adhered well to their health regimens. Carrying out self-care, medical care and feeling responsible for self-care were the most significant predictors to good adherence in all models. No significant differences in adherence were found in male and female subjects, age groups or educational levels. Support from healthcare providers and support from relatives were not significant predictors of good adherence.
FAs in Finland adhere well to health regimens and exceptionally well to medication. Variables that predict the best adherence of FAs to health regimens are carrying out self-care, receiving medical care and feeling responsible for self-care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26996780 View in PubMed
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Culturally and linguistically diverse healthcare students' experiences of the clinical learning environment and mentoring: A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308558
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2019 Nov; 41:102637
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2019
Author
Heidi Korhonen
Anna-Maria Tuomikoski
Ashlee Oikarainen
Maria Kääriäinen
Satu Elo
Helvi Kyngäs
Eeva Liikanen
Kristina Mikkonen
Author Affiliation
Lapland University of Applied Sciences, Kemi, Finland. Electronic address: heidi.korhonen@lapinamk.fi.
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2019 Nov; 41:102637
Date
Nov-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Communication Barriers
Cultural Diversity
Delivery of Health Care
Female
Finland
Humans
Internationality
Learning
Male
Mentoring - standards
Qualitative Research
Social Discrimination
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
Development of educators' and students' global competence in higher education is increasingly important due to internationalization. Internationalization significantly influences healthcare education through an increase in the mobility of students. When conducting clinical practice in healthcare education, culturally and linguistically diverse healthcare students face the challenges of having limited learning opportunities and social isolation. Further investigation is required of students' experiences in this area while asking them to share their experiences. This study aimed to describe students' experiences of clinical learning environment and mentoring. A qualitative research design was used during 2013-2016. Data were collected from 133 culturally and linguistically diverse healthcare students, including exchange students and students studying in English language-taught degree programmes at eight Universities of Applied Sciences in Finland. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Students' experiences were related to their mentors' competence in mentoring, culturally diverse pedagogical atmosphere, and aspects of diversity that influence clinical learning. Students reported that they had experienced social isolation, discrimination, bullying, sexual harassment and prejudice during their clinical placements. These issues related to mistreatment of students need to be addressed. Also, structured clinical environments should be developed in which competent mentors assist students in reaching their clinical placement goals.
PubMed ID
31634696 View in PubMed
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A descriptive qualitative study of adolescent girls' well-being in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257278
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Varpu Wiens
Helvi Kyngäs
Tarja Pölkki
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences, Oulu University, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that girls present welfare-related symptoms differently than boys and that the severity of their symptoms increases with age. Girls living in Northern Finland experience reduced well-being in some aspects of their lives. However, the opinions of girls on these matters have not previously been studied.
The aim of this study was to describe girls' well-being in Northern Finland.
This is a descriptive qualitative study. The participants were 117 girls aged between 13 and 16 who were living in the province of Lapland in Finland and attending primary school. Data were collected electronically; the girls were asked to respond to a set of open-ended questions using a computer during a school day. The responses were evaluated by using inductive content analysis.
Four main categories of girls' well-being were identified: health as a resource, a beneficial lifestyle, positive experience of life course, and favourable social relationships. Health as a resource was about feeling healthy and the ability to enjoy life. A beneficial lifestyle was about healthy habits and meaningful hobbies. Positive experience of life course is related to high self-esteem and feeling good, safe, and optimistic. Favourable social relationships meant having good relationships with family and friends.
To the participating girls, well-being was a positive experience and feeling which was revealed when they interact between their relationships, living conditions, lifestyle, and environment. Knowledge about girls' description of their well-being can be used to understand how the girls themselves and their environment influence their well-being and what can be done to promote it.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25317384 View in PubMed
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Developing and testing a middle-range theory of the well-being supportive physical environment of home-dwelling elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113072
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2013;2013:945635
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Satu Elo
Maria Kääriäinen
Arja Isola
Helvi Kyngäs
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. satu.elo@oulu.fi
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2013;2013:945635
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland
Geriatric Nursing - methods
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Male
Models, Nursing
Nursing Care - methods
Nursing Homes
Self Concept
Social Environment
Abstract
The aim is to describe the development of a middle-range theory by using an inductive-deductive approach. A theory of well-being supporting physical environment of home-dwelling elderly is used as an example. The inductive-deductive theory development process is described through four different phases: (1) the creations of concepts were described inductively through concept synthesis, (2) relationships between the concepts were examined to set up a hypothetical model, (3) hypotheses were set up to verify the concepts and to test hypothetical models, and (4) the verification and presentation of the theory.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23766727 View in PubMed
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The effects of a counselling intervention on lifestyle change in people at risk of cardiovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269352
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Apr;14(2):153-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Eeva-Leena Ylimäki
Outi Kanste
Hanna Heikkinen
Risto Bloigu
Helvi Kyngäs
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Apr;14(2):153-61
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Directive Counseling
Exercise
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
The study assessed the effects of a counselling intervention on lifestyle changes in certain-aged people at risk of cardiovascular disease.
This was an intervention study at baseline and six- and 12-month follow-ups. The participants were 40 years old (n= 53 at baseline, n=33 at six months and n=34 at 12 months). The main outcomes were cardiovascular health parameters, such as weight, BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol (total, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein), blood glucose, and self-assessed and reported lifestyle and adherence to lifestyle changes. The counselling intervention was Internet-based and carried out via Skype or face-to-face in small groups (on average, six participants).
There were statistically significant differences between the baseline and the 12-month follow-up with respect to the consumption of fat and snacks. Some positive cardiovascular health improvements were detected between baseline and six months, but not as clearly between baseline and 12 months. The participants reported having a healthier diet at 12 months than at baseline. At 12 months, BMI measurements indicated that all participants were overweight (mean BMI 29.8), but according to the self-assessed data, only 25% considered themselves to be so.
Changes in lifestyle were detected as a result of the intervention. These lifestyle changes may improve cardiovascular health in the long term. Discrepancies were found between the measured indicators of cardiovascular health and information obtained from questionnaires and diary records. In order to achieve sustainable lifestyle changes, long-term support is required.
PubMed ID
24463729 View in PubMed
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The effects of intervention on quality of telephone triage at an emergency unit in Finland: Nurses' perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284257
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2016 May;26:26-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Pirjo Kaakinen
Helvi Kyngäs
Kaisa Tarkiainen
Maria Kääriäinen
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2016 May;26:26-31
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Emergency Nursing - education - manpower
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Female
Finland
Hotlines - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses - psychology
Perception
Surveys and Questionnaires
Triage - methods
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a nurse training intervention on the assessment of patients' care needs in telephone triage at an emergency unit. The objective of this study was to generate information about nurse training that can be utilized when developing telephone triage and health care education.
With the growing number of patients coming into emergency departments and a lack of resources in healthcare, it would be valuable to determine an effective training intervention in telephone triage, particularly when assessing the training needs of nurses.
The study was quasi-experimental, with a pre- and post-test design.
The data were collected from the nurses at the emergency department and joint emergency service of the Central Hospital in Northern Finland (baseline n?=?28, post-test n?=?26). The descriptive statistic, Fisher's ?(2) test and McNemar's test were used to analyse the data.
The intervention improved nurses' skills to evaluate patients' needs and health condition via the telephone triage. There was a statistically significant difference in the resources, knowledge, skills and attitudes of the nurses between the baseline and post-test measurements.
The nurse training intervention improved the quality of telephone triage.
Nurses should receive continuous training in telephone triage in order to maintain and reinforce their professional competence. When planning the training, the age and relevant work experience of the nurses should be taken into consideration as well, since the results indicate that they lead to variation in the nurses' competence.
PubMed ID
26433605 View in PubMed
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Effects of network development on attitudes towards work and well-being at work among health care staff in northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141236
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Sep;69(4):394-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Outi Kanste
Kaija Lipponen
Maria Kääriäinen
Helvi Kyngäs
Author Affiliation
Oulu Arc, Micropolis, 91100 Ii, Finland. outi.kanste@oulunkaari.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Sep;69(4):394-403
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Female
Finland
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the effects of network development between primary and special health care units on attitudes towards work and well-being at work among health care staff.
A prospective quasi-experimental design with intervention (n=33) and control (n=23) groups. This 2-year pilot intervention study was implemented in 14 health centres and 4 hospitals in northern Finland.
The material was gathered via self-reported questionnaires from the health care staff at baseline and 1 follow-up. The intervention was composed of regional networking, self-ruling teamwork, staff education and guidance for the multiprofessional teams consisting of participants from primary and special health care units. The objective of these teams was to construct and disseminate regional models of patient education for the service process of 6 patient groups: cardiovascular, COPD, total joint replacement, cerebral infarction, cancer and chronic ulcer patients.
The network development intervention had positive effects on attitudes towards work concerning organizational commitment, occupational commitment and growth satisfaction. The positive effects were also found in well-being at work, measured by absorption. The results are encouraging, although the study failed to demonstrate statistically significant improvements in other attitude and well-being outcomes that were measured.
Network development intervention particularly improved positive attitudes towards work among health care staff. Although randomized controlled trials are needed, regional network development between health centres and hospitals is recommended when the goal is positive attitudes towards work and well-being at work in sparsely populated and rural areas.
PubMed ID
20797322 View in PubMed
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The effects of nurse-led health coaching on health-related quality of life and clinical health outcomes among frequent attenders: A quasi-experimental study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306766
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2020 08; 103(8):1554-1561
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2020
Author
Kirsi Kivelä
Satu Elo
Helvi Kyngäs
Maria Kääriäinen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Nursing Science and Health Management, University of Oulu Finland University of Oulu, P.O.Box 5000, 90014, Finland. Electronic address: kirsi.kivela@dnainternet.net.
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2020 08; 103(8):1554-1561
Date
08-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease - nursing - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Mentoring - methods
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Outcome Assessment, Health Care
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Patients
Primary Health Care
Quality of Life
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To evaluate the effects of the nurse-led health coaching on health-related quality of life and clinical health outcomes among frequent attenders in primary healthcare.
A quasi-experimental study design. A total of 110 patients were enrolled in the study. The experimental group (n?=?52) received nurse-led health coaching and the control group (n?=?58) received the usual care at primary health care centres in Finland. The data were collected before the intervention and 12 months via a questionnaire of health-related quality of life and clinical health outcomes as measured by health-coaching nurses.
This study found frequent attenders have low health-related quality of life. The nurse-led health coaching showed no differences in health-related quality of life between the experimental and control groups. However, the nurse-led health coaching had statistically significant effects on the blood pressure and health-related quality of life among the experimental participants, especially in emotional role limitation and energy.
This study suggests that nurse-led health coaching may lead to an improvement in the health-related quality of life and blood pressure among frequent attenders.
The health-coaching sessions with own health-coaching nurses and action plans support the frequent attenders´ health promotion goals and implementation.
PubMed ID
32111383 View in PubMed
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Enhancing Adolescent Girls' Well-Being in the Arctic-Finding What Motivates Spending Time in Nature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304699
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 Feb 19; 18(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-19-2021
Author
Varpu Wiens
Kari Soronen
Helvi Kyngäs
Tarja Pölkki
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Nursing Science and Health Management, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 Feb 19; 18(4):
Date
Feb-19-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
According to previous studies, the natural environment positively influences well-being, including that of adolescent girls. However, knowledge is lacking on what motivates adolescent girls to spend time in nature. A secondary analysis of qualitative data was conducted employing three preexisting sets of interview data that had formed the basis of previously published research reports. A novel perspective on what motivates adolescent girls in the Arctic to spend time in nature was uncovered-a finding that previous articles have not reported.
The aim was to describe what motivates adolescent girls in the Arctic to spend time in nature.
The participants were adolescent girls aged 13 to 16 living in the province of Finnish Lapland. The girls wrote about well-being (n = 117) and were interviewed (n = 19) about the meaning of seasonal changes, nature and animals' influence on well-being. Also, five focus group interviews (n = 17) were held. The materials were analyzed by inductive content analysis.
After the secondary analysis, three generic categories were found: (1) wanting to have pleasant emotions, (2) the possibility of participating in activities and (3) a desire to feel better. The main category of "need to experience positive sensations" was formed.
Based on these results, through personalized guidance and advice, it is possible to strengthen adolescent girls' willingness to spend time in nature.
PubMed ID
33669840 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.