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[Case report: facial skin metastasis from rectal adenocarcinoma]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98199
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Feb;96(2):109-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Emil Vilbergsson
Helgi J Isaksson
Páll Helgi Möller
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Feb;96(2):109-10
Date
Feb-2010
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biopsy
Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell - secondary - surgery
Colonoscopy
Facial Neoplasms - secondary - surgery
Humans
Male
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Peritoneal Neoplasms - secondary
Rectal Neoplasms - pathology
Skin Neoplasms - secondary - surgery
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - secondary
Abstract
This case report describes an 82 year old male who sought medical attention for changes in bowel habits. Colonoscopy revealed a tumor located 10 to 15cm from the anus. Biopsy showed signetring cell adenocarcinoma. The tumor was not resected due peritoneal dissemination and a tumor invasion into the urinary bladder, found intraoperatively. During hospital stay a skin lesion of the face was removed at the request of the patient. Biopsy showed metastatic signetring adenocarcinoma. Colorectal metastatic lesions to the skin are rare findings, especially metastasis to the face. Skin examination in patients with suspected or known malignancies is an important part of the clinical examination. Key words: Rectal cancer, metastases, skin.
PubMed ID
20118505 View in PubMed
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[Factors predictive of survival after lobectomy for non-small cell lung cancer in Iceland during 1999-2008]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97563
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Apr;96(4):251-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Gudrún Nina Oskarsdóttir
Rut Skúladóttir
Helgi J Isaksson
Steinn Jónsson
Húnbogi Thorsteinsson
Tómas Gudbjartsson
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Apr;96(4):251-7
Date
Apr-2010
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality - pathology - physiopathology - surgery
Aged
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - mortality - pathology - physiopathology - surgery
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - physiopathology - surgery
Male
Neoplasm Staging
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the impact of TNM stage and various preoperative functional parameters on survival in patients who underwent lobectomy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Iceland from 1999 to 2008. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective study including 213 patients (mean age 66.9 yrs, equal male/female ratio) that underwent lobectomy for NSCLC. Tumors were staged by the TNM staging system, survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and prognostic factors of survival studied using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. RESULTS: Survival at 1 year was 82.7% and 45.1% at 5 years. Operative mortality at 30 days was 0%. Most tumors were found to be in stage I (59.6%) or stage II (17.8%) and 7% were stage IIIA, whereas 14.6% were in stage IIIB or IV. Using multivariate analysis; advancing stage, increasing tumor size, reduced lung function and history of arrhythmia, predicted worse survival, whereas adenocarcinoma histology was a positive prognostic factor (HR 0.5, p=0.002) when compared to other histological types. CONCLUSIONS: Survival for patients undergoing lobectomy for operable non-small cell lung cancer in Iceland is comparable with other studies. Advanced stage, tumor size, reduced lung function and arrhythmia were negative predictors of survival, but in contrast to many but not all studies adenocarcinoma histology predicted a better prognosis compared to other tumor types.
PubMed ID
20339164 View in PubMed
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Familial risk of lung carcinoma in the Icelandic population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17299
Source
JAMA. 2004 Dec 22;292(24):2977-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-22-2004
Author
Steinn Jonsson
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Hjortur H Jonsson
Kristleifur Kristjansson
Sigurdur Arnason
Vilmundur Gudnason
Helgi J Isaksson
Jonas Hallgrimsson
Jeffrey R Gulcher
Laufey T Amundadottir
Augustine Kong
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Landspitali-University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
JAMA. 2004 Dec 22;292(24):2977-83
Date
Dec-22-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - genetics
Adult
Carcinoma, Small Cell - epidemiology - genetics
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Abstract
CONTEXT: The dominant role of tobacco smoke as a causative factor in lung carcinoma is well established; however, an inherited predisposition may also be an important factor in the susceptibility to lung carcinoma. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the contribution of genetic factors to the risk of developing lung carcinoma in the Icelandic population. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Risk ratios (RRs) of lung carcinoma for first-, second-, and third-degree relatives of patients with lung carcinoma were estimated by linking records from the Icelandic Cancer Registry (ICR) of all 2756 patients diagnosed with lung carcinoma within the Icelandic population from January 1, 1955, to February 28, 2002, with an extensive genealogical database containing all living Icelanders and most of their ancestors since the settlement of Iceland. The RR for smoking was similarly estimated using a random population-based cohort of 10,541 smokers from the Reykjavik Heart Study who had smoked for more than 10 years. Of these smokers, 562 developed lung cancer based on the patients with lung cancer list from the ICR. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Estimation of RRs of close and distant relatives of patients with lung carcinoma and comparison with RRs for close and distant relatives of smokers. RESULTS: A familial factor for lung carcinoma was shown to extend beyond the nuclear family, as evidenced by significantly increased RR for first-degree relatives (for parents: RR, 2.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.20-3.23; for siblings: RR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.77-2.23; and for children: RR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.53-2.39), second-degree relatives (for uncles/aunts: RR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.15-1.49; and for nephews/nieces: RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.10-1.43), and third-degree relatives (for cousins: RR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.05-1.22) of patients with lung carcinoma. This effect was stronger for relatives of patients with early-onset disease (age at onset
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2004 Dec 22;292(24):3026-915613673
Erratum In: JAMA. 2005 Jan 12;293(2):163
PubMed ID
15613665 View in PubMed
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Genetic correction of PSA values using sequence variants associated with PSA levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99854
Source
Sci Transl Med. 2010 Dec 15;2(62):62ra92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2010
Author
Julius Gudmundsson
Soren Besenbacher
Patrick Sulem
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Isleifur Olafsson
Sturla Arinbjarnarson
Bjarni A Agnarsson
Kristrun R Benediktsdottir
Helgi J Isaksson
Jelena P Kostic
Sigurjon A Gudjonsson
Simon N Stacey
Arnaldur Gylfason
Asgeir Sigurdsson
Hilma Holm
Unnur S Bjornsdottir
Gudmundur I Eyjolfsson
Sebastian Navarrete
Fernando Fuertes
Maria D Garcia-Prats
Eduardo Polo
Ionel A Checherita
Mariana Jinga
Paula Badea
Katja K Aben
Jack A Schalken
Inge M van Oort
Fred C Sweep
Brian T Helfand
Michael Davis
Jenny L Donovan
Freddie C Hamdy
Kristleifur Kristjansson
Jeffrey R Gulcher
Gisli Masson
Augustine Kong
William J Catalona
Jose I Mayordomo
Gudmundur Geirsson
Gudmundur V Einarsson
Rosa B Barkardottir
Eirikur Jonsson
Viorel Jinga
Dana Mates
Lambertus A Kiemeney
David E Neal
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Thorunn Rafnar
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
deCODE genetics, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. julius@decode.is
Source
Sci Transl Med. 2010 Dec 15;2(62):62ra92
Date
Dec-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Measuring serum levels of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the most common screening method for prostate cancer. However, PSA levels are affected by a number of factors apart from neoplasia. Notably, around 40% of the variability of PSA levels in the general population is accounted for by inherited factors, suggesting that it may be possible to improve both sensitivity and specificity by adjusting test results for genetic effects. To search for sequence variants that associate with PSA levels, we performed a genome-wide association study and follow-up analysis using PSA information from 15,757 Icelandic and 454 British men not diagnosed with prostate cancer. Overall, we detected a genome-wide significant association between PSA levels and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at six loci: 5p15.33 (rs2736098), 10q11 (rs10993994), 10q26 (rs10788160), 12q24 (rs11067228), 17q12 (rs4430796), and 19q13.33 [rs17632542 (KLK3: I179T)], each with P(combined)
PubMed ID
21160077 View in PubMed
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Genome-wide associations for benign prostatic hyperplasia reveal a genetic correlation with serum levels of PSA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299851
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 11 08; 9(1):4568
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-08-2018
Author
Julius Gudmundsson
Jon K Sigurdsson
Lilja Stefansdottir
Bjarni A Agnarsson
Helgi J Isaksson
Olafur A Stefansson
Sigurjon A Gudjonsson
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Gisli Masson
Michael L Frigge
Simon N Stacey
Patrick Sulem
Gisli H Halldorsson
Vinicius Tragante
Hilma Holm
Gudmundur I Eyjolfsson
Olof Sigurdardottir
Isleifur Olafsson
Thorvaldur Jonsson
Eirikur Jonsson
Rosa B Barkardottir
Rafn Hilmarsson
Folkert W Asselbergs
Gudmundur Geirsson
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Thorunn Rafnar
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
deCODE genetics/AMGEN, 101, Reykjavik, Iceland. julius.gudmundsson@decode.is.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 11 08; 9(1):4568
Date
11-08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acetylation
Aged
Computational Biology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Histones - metabolism
Humans
Iceland
Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms - blood - genetics
Lysine - metabolism
Male
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Multifactorial Inheritance - genetics
Mutation - genetics
Phenotype
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Hyperplasia - blood - genetics
Quantitative Trait Loci - genetics
Risk factors
United Kingdom
Abstract
Benign prostatic hyperplasia and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (BPH/LUTS) are common conditions affecting the majority of elderly males. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of symptomatic BPH/LUTS in 20,621 patients and 280,541 controls of European ancestry, from Iceland and the UK. We discovered 23 genome-wide significant variants, located at 14 loci. There is little or no overlap between the BPH/LUTS variants and published prostate cancer risk variants. However, 15 of the variants reported here also associate with serum levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) (at a Bonferroni corrected P?
PubMed ID
30410027 View in PubMed
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Genome-wide significant association between a sequence variant at 15q15.2 and lung cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137232
Source
Cancer Res. 2011 Feb 15;71(4):1356-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2011
Author
Thorunn Rafnar
Patrick Sulem
Soren Besenbacher
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Carlo Zanon
Julius Gudmundsson
Simon N Stacey
Jelena P Kostic
Thorgeir E Thorgeirsson
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Hjordis Bjarnason
Halla Skuladottir
Tomas Gudbjartsson
Helgi J Isaksson
Dolores Isla
Laura Murillo
Maria D García-Prats
Angeles Panadero
Katja K H Aben
Sita H Vermeulen
Henricus F M van der Heijden
William J Feser
York E Miller
Paul A Bunn
Augustine Kong
Holly J Wolf
Wilbur A Franklin
Jose I Mayordomo
Lambertus A Kiemeney
Steinn Jonsson
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
deCODE genetics, Department of Medical Oncology, Landspitali-University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Cancer Res. 2011 Feb 15;71(4):1356-61
Date
Feb-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - genetics
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15 - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - genetics
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Polymorphism, Genetic - physiology
Risk factors
Spain - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 3 genomic regions, at 15q24-25.1, 5p15.33, and 6p21.33, which associate with the risk of lung cancer. Large meta-analyses of GWA data have failed to find additional associations of genome-wide significance. In this study, we sought to confirm 7 variants with suggestive association to lung cancer (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
21303977 View in PubMed
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Increased population use of medications for male lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia correlates with changes in indications for transurethral resection of the prostate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258358
Source
Scand J Urol. 2014 Feb;48(1):73-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Johann P Ingimarsson
Helgi J Isaksson
Hermann P Sigbjarnarson
Jens Gudmundsson
Gudmundur Geirsson
Author Affiliation
Departments of 1Urology.
Source
Scand J Urol. 2014 Feb;48(1):73-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Humans
Iceland
Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms - complications - drug therapy - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Hyperplasia - complications - drug therapy - surgery
Retrospective Studies
Transurethral Resection of Prostate - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine whether there are correlations between medication use for lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostate hypertrophy (LUTS/BPH) and alteration in incidence and indications for transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP).
The number of TURP patients between 1984 and 2008 in Iceland was obtained from hospital registries. The number of defined daily doses (DDDs) of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors (5aRIs) and alpha-blockers (ABs) sold was obtained from the Icelandic Medicines Control Agency. Charts of all surgical BPH patients in Iceland from 1998 to 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. The main outcomes measures were: DDDs sold of 5aRIs and ABs, total numbers of TURP, indications for TURP and complications.
After the introduction of ABs and 5aRIs, sales increased annually at a near linear rate. TURP rates peaked in 1992, then declined. In 2008, 81 and 3.4 of 1000 men over the age of 50 used LUTS/BPH medications or underwent TURP, respectively. There was an inverse correlation between LUTS/BPH medication use and (i) overall TURP (R(2) = 0.85), (ii) TURP done for absolute indications (R(2) = 0.91), and (iii) LUTS with (R(2) = 0.77) and (iv) without previous medical therapy (R(2) = 0.75). As medication use rose, fewer TURPs were performed for previous history of urinary retention, and more for recurrent urinary tract infections.
Increased use of ABs and 5aRIs in the Icelandic population correlated with decreasing incidences of TURP procedures for both LUTS and absolute indications. The sequelae of BPH and indications for TURP are changing as medication use increases, although a clear causative link is hard to establish.
PubMed ID
23924152 View in PubMed
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[Organising Pneumonia - a review and results from Icelandic studies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159290
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Jan;94(1):27-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Olafur A Sveinsson
Helgi J Isaksson
Gunnar Gudmundsson
Author Affiliation
Lungnadeild, Landspítala.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Jan;94(1):27-35
Date
Jan-2008
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cough - etiology
Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Dyspnea - etiology
Fever - etiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Recurrence
Spirometry
Steroids - therapeutic use
Terminology as Topic
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Organising pneumonia (OP) is a relatively rare interstitial lung disease. It s definition is based on a characteristic histological pattern in the presence of certain clinical and radiological features. Organising pneumonia represents also what has been called Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organising Pneumonia (BOOP). Recently it has been recommended to call OP cryptogenic organising pneumonia (COP) when no definite cause or characteristic clinical context is found and secondary organising pneumonia (SOP) when causes can be identified such as infection or it occurs in a characteristic clinical context such as connective tissue disorder. The most common clinical symptoms are dyspnea, cough, fever and general malaise. It is common that symptoms have been present for some weeks before the diagnosis is made. Patients commonly have lowered PO2 and a mildly restrictive spirometry. Radiographic features are most often patchy bilateral airspace opacities but an interstitial pattern or focal opacities can also be seen. Most of patients respond well to steroids but relapses are quite common. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of the disease and the main results from studies on OP in Iceland. The mean annual incidence for OP in Iceland was 1.97/100,000 inhabitants. Annual incidence for COP was 1.10/100,000 and 0.87/100,000 for SOP. This is higher than in most other studies. In Iceland patients with OP had a higher standardized mortality ratio than the general population despite good clinical responses. No clinical symptoms could separate between SOP and COP.
PubMed ID
18204109 View in PubMed
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[Postoperative complications following lobectomy for lung cancer in Iceland during 1999-2008]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97564
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Apr;96(4):243-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Rut Skúladóttir
Gudrún Nína Oskarsdóttir
Helgi J Isaksson
Steinn Jónsson
Húnbogi Thorsteinsson
Tómas Gudbjartsson
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Apr;96(4):243-9
Date
Apr-2010
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Length of Stay
Logistic Models
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Male
Mediastinoscopy
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Postoperative Complications - etiology - mortality - surgery
Reoperation
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the second most common cancer in Iceland. We studied the indications and surgical outcome of lobectomy for NSCLC in Iceland. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 213 consecutive patients underwent lobectomy for NSCLC between 1999 and 2008. Data on indications, histology, TNM-stage and complications were analysed, and logistic regression used to assess outcome predictors. RESULTS: The majority of patients (60%) were referred because of symptoms, whereas 40% were asymptomatic. Adenocarcinoma (62%) and squamous cell carcinoma (29%) were the most frequent histological types. Operative staging showed that 59.6% of cases were stage I, 17.8% were stage II, 7% were stage IIIA and 14.6% were stage IIIB or IV. Mediastinoscopy was performed in 13.6% of cases. Mean operative time was 128 min., operative bleeding 580 ml and median hospital stay 10 days. Sixteen patients (7.5%) had major complications and 36 (17.5%) had minor complications, such as atrial fibrillation and pneumonia. Twelve patients required reoperation, most often due to bleeding, but two had empyema and one had a bronchopleural fistula. Older patients with high ASA scores and extensive smoking history were at increased risk for complications. No patient died within 30 days of surgery whereas two (0,9%) died within 90 days of surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The results of lobectomy for NSCLC in Iceland are excellent in relation to operative mortality and short term complications.
PubMed ID
20339163 View in PubMed
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Primary adenocarcinoma of the lung--histological subtypes and outcome after surgery, using the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of lung adenocarcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275539
Source
APMIS. 2016 May;124(5):384-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Gudrun Nina Oskarsdottir
Johannes Bjornsson
Steinn Jonsson
Helgi J Isaksson
Tomas Gudbjartsson
Source
APMIS. 2016 May;124(5):384-92
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - classification - mortality - pathology - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - classification - mortality - pathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of lung carcinoma. Recently the histologic classification of adenocarcinomas in the lung was modified to better reflect biologic properties and prognosis. We reviewed the histology of all primary lung adenocarcinomas operated on in Iceland during a 20-year period and assessed the impact of histology on survival. This nationwide study included 285 patients (mean age 67 years, 57% female), who underwent resection in Iceland from 1991 to 2010. Tumors were reclassified according to the current IASLC/ATS/ERS classification system. Overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis used to evaluate prognostic factors of overall mortality. Acinar predominant adenocarcinoma was the most common histological subtype (46%) followed by solid-predominant (SPA) with mucin production comprised (23%). Non-invasive carcinomas were rare. A difference in survival between the histological adenocarcinoma subtypes was not seen (p = 0.32) and multivariate analysis showed that advanced stage and age predicted worse outcome, but histologic subtyping of adenocarcinoma did not. In this nation-wide study there was not a statistical difference in survival according to adenocarcinoma subtypes and the histological subtype did not predict mortality. Preinvasive and minimally invasive adenocarcinomas were rare.
PubMed ID
26957057 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.