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The incidence and prevalence of acromegaly, a nationwide study from 1955 through 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262036
Source
Pituitary. 2015 Apr 17;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-17-2015
Author
Gudrun Thuridur Hoskuldsdottir
Sigridur Bara Fjalldal
Helga Agusta Sigurjonsdottir
Source
Pituitary. 2015 Apr 17;
Date
Apr-17-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Acromegaly is a rare disease with complications and increased mortality. The incidence and prevalence of acromegaly worldwide is not well known.
To gather information on patients diagnosed with acromegly in Iceland over 59 years.
Information was retrospectively gathered about patients diagnosed with acromegaly from 1955 through 2013. Incidence was calculated from the total Icelandic population.
Information was gathered from medical records at Landspitali National University Hospital, Iceland, housing the only endocrine department in the country, at the largest hospital outside of Reykjavik (Sjúkrahúsið á Akureyri, Akureyri Hospital) and the largest private outpatient clinic in Reykjavik, where some of the patients received follow-up care. Further, information on patients were sought from all endocrinologists treating adult patients in Iceland. All patients diagnosed with acromegaly during the study period were included.
Fifty-two patients (32 men) were diagnosed during the study period. The average age at diagnosis was 44.5 years. Nine patients had died. Symptoms had been present for more than 3 years in most cases. Twenty-five patients had hypertension (48 %). Follow up information was available for 48 patients, 63 % were considered cured after treatment.
The incidence of acromegaly in Iceland during the study period was much higher than earlier reports have indicated. During the last 9 years of the study 7.7 patients were diagnosed per million per year. At diagnosis, 38 % had developed hypertension and 10 % were diagnosed during follow up. This indicates the importance of endocrine disorders in the aetiology of hypertension.
PubMed ID
25893613 View in PubMed
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The incidence and prevalence of Cushing's disease may be higher than previously thought: results from a retrospective study in Iceland 1955 through 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138450
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2011 Jun;74(6):792-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011

INCREASING PREVALENCE OF ADDISON DISEASE: RESULTS FROM A NATIONWIDE STUDY.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275223
Source
Endocr Pract. 2016 Jan;22(1):30-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Andri Snaer Olafsson
Helga Agusta Sigurjonsdottir
Source
Endocr Pract. 2016 Jan;22(1):30-5
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Addison Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hormone Replacement Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hydrocortisone - therapeutic use
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Abstract
Primary adrenal insufficiency is a life-threatening endocrine disease unless properly treated. However, few studies on the prevalence, concomitances of the disease, and prescribing of drugs have been published. The goal of the study was to establish the prevalence of primary adrenal insufficiency in Iceland and additionally, to study the most common concomitant diseases in patients with primary adrenal insufficiency, as well as the mode of glucocorticoid replacement therapies.
To achieve this, the medical records of all patients in Iceland who had received the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, diagnosis code E27, were evaluated for true primary adrenal insufficiency. Additionally, these records were evaluated for concomitant diseases, as well as the mode of glucocorticoid replacement therapy. The study covered the whole population of Iceland over 18 years of age. It was thus a nationwide study. The records were retrieved from large hospitals and clinics and every practicing specialist in endocrinology.
Primary adrenal insufficiency was found in 53 individuals, 26 women and 27 men, yielding a prevalence of 22.1 per 100,000 population. Hypothyroidism was by far the most common concomitant disease. Most patients had their glucocorticoid deficiency replaced with short-acting glucocorticoids.
The prevalence of primary adrenal insufficiency in Iceland is higher than in earlier reports, with comorbidities being in line with recent studies. Treatment is according to the latest protocols.
PubMed ID
26437215 View in PubMed
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Primary aldosteronism: from case detection to histopathology with up to 6 years of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286545
Source
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2017 Apr;19(4):424-430
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Gudbjörg Jonsdottir
Jon Gudmundsson
Gudjon Birgisson
Helga Agusta Sigurjonsdottir
Source
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2017 Apr;19(4):424-430
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - surgery
Adrenal Glands - blood supply
Adrenalectomy - methods
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Hyperaldosteronism - diagnosis - surgery
Hyperplasia
Hypertension - drug therapy
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
The authors aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics, accuracy of diagnostic tests, and long-term outcomes after interventions in patients diagnosed with primary aldosteronism (PA) in Iceland throughout 5 years. A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients diagnosed with PA during the years 2007-2011 at Landspitali Hospital in Iceland, a referral center for the whole country. Workup after detection included salt loading test, positional test, computed tomography, and adrenal vein sampling. Patients with unilateral disease were offered treatment with adrenalectomy. A total of 33 patients were diagnosed with PA during the study period: 17 patients with bilateral disease and 16 with unilateral disease. Results from salt loading test were positive in 90% of patients. In patients with adenoma, 36% were responsive on their positional test and computed tomography scan showed a nodule in 73%. All patients with unilateral disease had a lateralization index =3. After surgery, patients had lower systolic blood pressure (P
PubMed ID
27878955 View in PubMed
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Sheehan's syndrome in Modern Times. A nationwide retrospective study in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99778
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2010 Dec 23;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-23-2010
Author
Hallgerdur Lind Kristjansdottir
Sigrun Perla Bodvarsdottir
Helga Agusta Sigurjonsdottir
Author Affiliation
H Kristjansdottir, Internal Medicine, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2010 Dec 23;
Date
Dec-23-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objective: Half a century ago the prevalence of Sheehan's syndrome (SS) was 10-20 per 100,000 women. With better obstetric help the prevalence is assumed to have decreased, especially in developed countries. Design: We studied the prevalence of SS in 2009 in a nationwide retrospective population-based study. Methods: All patients with diagnosed SS were identified, and information regarding obstetric care, clinical presentation and hormonal assays was collected. Correlation was calculated with Kendall's-tau b. Significance level: p1000 ml). Six had complicated deliveries. The most common clinical presentation was failure to lactate and failure to resume menstruation. The patients had three to five failing pituitary axis. There was no correlation between bleeding at delivery or the number of hormonal axes affected and DD. Conclusion: The prevalence of SS in Iceland was higher than we expected in a country with modern obstetric care. Long DD and incidental diagnosis indicate that women might be lacking correct diagnosis and treatment, and thus the prevalence of SS is even higher. As SS is easily diagnosed and treatable, but can be life-threatening if unrecognised, doctors need to be aware of the disease.
PubMed ID
21183555 View in PubMed
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