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Given breast cancer, does breast size matter? Data from a prospective breast cancer cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123464
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Aug;23(8):1307-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Andrea Markkula
Anna Bromée
Maria Henningson
Maria Hietala
Anita Ringberg
Christian Ingvar
Carsten Rose
Helena Jernström
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Barngatan 2B, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Aug;23(8):1307-16
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Composition
Body mass index
Breast - anatomy & histology
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Cohort Studies
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - pathology
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and tumor characteristics affect disease-free survival. Larger breast size may increase breast cancer risk, but its influence on disease-free survival is unclear. The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether breast size independently influenced disease-free survival in breast cancer patients.
Body measurements were obtained preoperatively from 772 breast cancer patients in a population-based ongoing cohort from southern Sweden. The research nurse measured breast volumes with plastic cups used by plastic surgeons doing breast reductions. Clinical data were obtained from patient charts and pathology reports.
Patients with a BMI = 25 kg/m(2) had larger tumors (p  0.85 had larger tumors (p = 0.013), more advanced histological grade (p = 0.0016), and more axillary nodal involvement (p = 0.012). Patients with right + left breast volume = 850 mL were more likely to have larger tumor sizes (p = 0.018), more advanced histological grade (p = 0.031), and more axillary nodal involvement (p = 0.025). There were 62 breast cancer events during the 7-year follow-up. Breast volume = 850 mL was associated with shorter disease-free survival (p = 0.004) and distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.001) in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors independent of other anthropometric measurements and age. In patients with ER-positive tumors, breast size was an independent predictor of shorter disease-free (HR 3.64; 95 % CI 1.42-9.35) and distant metastasis-free survival (HR 6.33; 95 %CI 1.36-29.43), adjusted for tumor characteristics, BMI, age, and treatment.
A simple and cheap anthropometric measurement with standardized tools may help identify a subgroup of patients in need of tailored breast cancer therapy.
PubMed ID
22695757 View in PubMed
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Increased incidence of childhood, prostate and breast cancers in relatives of childhood cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129305
Source
Fam Cancer. 2012 Mar;11(1):145-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Susanne Magnusson
Thomas Wiebe
Ulf Kristoffersson
Helena Jernström
HÃ¥kan Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Barngatan 2B, 22185, Lund, Sweden. susanne.magnusson@med.lu.se
Source
Fam Cancer. 2012 Mar;11(1):145-55
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Family
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Whether cancer predisposing familial factors are associated with childhood tumors is unclear. The purpose was to study the incidence of childhood and adult tumors in extended families of children with cancer. Family history of cancer was obtained through questionnaires, and the Swedish Population-, and Cancer Registries for 194 childhood cancer patients aged =18 years, diagnosed 1972-2009. Standardized cancer incidence ratios (SIR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated and compared with expected rates. Overall, 21 of the 194 patients had any relative with a childhood tumor. When restricted to first- to third degree relatives, increased incidences of childhood (SIR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.3-4.4) and adult tumors (SIR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.3-1.7), especially in the prostate (SIR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.9-3.8) and breast (SIR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.2-2.4) were observed. Prostate and breast cancers were observed at earlier than average ages. No TP53 mutations or known cancer predisposing syndromes were found in families with multiple childhood tumors. Familial factors may increase the risk for childhood cancer and modify the age of onset of common adult tumors. Studying extended families with multiple childhood tumors may be a valuable approach to understanding the etiology of childhood tumors.
PubMed ID
22120843 View in PubMed
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[Natural remedies and hormone preparations--potential risk for breast cancer patients. A study surveys the use of agents which possibly counteract with the treatment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16609
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Oct 31-Nov 6;102(44):3226-8, 3230-1
Publication Type
Article
Author
Farnaz Malekzadeh
Carsten Rose
Christian Ingvar
Helena Jernström
Author Affiliation
Lunds universitet.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Oct 31-Nov 6;102(44):3226-8, 3230-1
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Aromatase Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy
Contraceptives, Oral, Hormonal - administration & dosage - adverse effects
English Abstract
Female
Herb-Drug Interactions
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Humans
Phytotherapy - adverse effects
Plant Preparations - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Tamoxifen - administration & dosage
Abstract
We have studied the use of complimentary alternative medicine (CAM) among 233 consecutive breast cancer patients operated on at the Lund University Hospital, Sweden between 2002 and 2004. Questionnaires were administered preoperatively (n = 233), and again 3-6 months post-operatively (n = 167) and one year after surgery (n = 88). At baseline, 14,5% used CAM, 3-6 months post-operatively 14,4% used CAM and one year after surgery 18,2% used CAM. The most common products contained omega-3, garlic, ginseng and roseroot. We identified use of 35 different types of CAM products and seven of these could potentially increase the risk of breast cancer or interact with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors: soy, garlic, ginko biloba, echinacea, ginseng, valerian and phytoestrogens (excluding soy). Five and a half percent of the patients used either hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or hormonal contraception at the pre-operative visit, after they had received their breast cancer diagnosis. In conclusion, it is important that doctors discuss the use of CAM and exogenous hormone therapy with their breast cancer patients given the prevalence of these drugs.
PubMed ID
16329453 View in PubMed
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