Skip header and navigation

Refine By

38 records – page 1 of 4.

The ability of the ICD-AIS map to identify seriously injured patients in road traffic accidents-A study from Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299598
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2018; 19(8):819-824
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Noora Airaksinen
Ilona Nurmi-Lüthje
Heikki Kröger
Peter Lüthje
Author Affiliation
a Faculty of Heath Sciences , University of Eastern Finland , Kuopio , Finland.
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2018; 19(8):819-824
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Medical Records - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In Finland, the severity of road traffic injuries is determined using the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Finnish Modification (ICD-10-FM) injury codes from Finnish Hospital Discharge data and the automatic conversion tool (ICD-AIS map) developed by the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine (AAAM). The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of the ICD-AIS map to identify seriously injured patients due to traffic accidents in Finnish injury data by comparing the severity rating generated by an expert and by the ICD-AIS map.
Our data came from the North Kymi Hospital (level 2 trauma center at the time of the study). The data included 574 patients who were injured in traffic accidents during 2 years. The severity rating (Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale [MAIS] 3+) of each patient was recorded retrospectively by an expert based on information from patient records. In addition, the rating was generated from ICD-10 injury codes by the ICD-AIS map conversion tool. These 2 ratings were compared by road user categories and the strength of agreement was described using Cohen's kappa.
The proportion of seriously injured patients was 10.1% as defined by the expert and 6.6% as generated by the ICD-AIS map; exact agreement was 65.5%. The highest concordance was for pedestrians (exact agreement 100%) and the weakest for moped drivers and motorcyclists (46.7%). Furthermore, the overall strength of agreement of the severity ratings (slightly or seriously injured) between the expert and the ICD-AIS map was good (??=?0.70). Most (65%) of the conversion problems were misclassifications caused by the simplicity of the Finnish ICD-10 injury codes compared to the injury codes used in the ICD-AIS map. In Finland, the injuries are recorded mainly with 4-digit codes and, infrequently, with 5-digit codes, whereas the ICD-AIS map defines up to 6-digit codes.
For this sample of simplified ICD-10-FM codes, the ICD-AIS map underestimated the number of seriously injured patients. The mapping result could be improved if at least open and closed fractures of extremities and visceral contusions and ruptures had separate codes. In addition, there were a few injury codes that should be considered for inclusion in the map.
PubMed ID
30543466 View in PubMed
Less detail

Agreement of self-reported estrogen use with prescription data: an analysis of women from the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study .

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160362
Source
Menopause. 2008 Mar-Apr;15(2):282-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lorenzo Sandini
Kati Pentti
Marjo Tuppurainen
Heikki Kröger
Risto Honkanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Lorenzo.Sandini@uku.fi
Source
Menopause. 2008 Mar-Apr;15(2):282-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Data Collection - methods
Estrogens - therapeutic use
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Hormone Replacement Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Osteoporosis - drug therapy
Postal Service
Reproducibility of Results
Self Administration - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Self-reported data are usually used for the evaluation of the effects of hormone therapy in population studies. We examined the agreement between self-reported hormone therapy use and nationwide prescription data from the Social Insurance Institution of Finland to evaluate the accuracy of self-reports.
The 10-year questionnaire of the population-based Kuopio Osteoporosis Study was sent in 1999 to 12,562 women aged 57 to 67 years; 11,377 women who completed questionnaires were eligible for analysis. We asked women whether they had been taking estrogen hormone therapy as a gel, plaster, or tablet for the treatment of climacteric symptoms or osteoporosis and if the answer was yes, to specify the brand and duration of treatment for each year from 1994 to 1999.
Among the 11,377 women, 3,105 (27.3%) reported the use of an estrogen-based preparation in 1996 to 1999, and 97.6% were confirmed by Social Insurance Institution of Finland to have been prescribed hormone therapy during that time. In these women the median duration of use was 32 months (range, 1-41), according to Social Insurance Institution of Finland data. An additional 1,738 women had been prescribed hormone therapy for short periods, but those women did not report it. The duration of self-reported hormone therapy use was compared to the duration of prescriptions. A difference of 3 months or less per year was observed in 63.4% to 77.0% of women during the years 1996-1998.
A postal inquiry is a reliable method of recording long-term hormone therapy use.
PubMed ID
17998884 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption and bone mineral density in elderly women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122594
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Apr;16(4):704-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Isolde Sommer
Arja T Erkkilä
Ritva Järvinen
Jaakko Mursu
Joonas Sirola
Jukka S Jurvelin
Heikki Kröger
Marjo Tuppurainen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. Isolde.Sommer@port.ac.uk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Apr;16(4):704-12
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Beverages - analysis
Anthropometry
Bone Density
Cohort Studies
Female
Femur Neck - radiography
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Lumbar vertebrae - radiography
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Findings regarding alcohol consumption and bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly women have been inconsistent. The objective of the present study was to explore the association of alcohol intake with BMD in elderly women.
This cohort study included women from the population-based Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention - Fracture Prevention Study (OSTPRE-FPS). Alcohol intake and potential confounders were assessed at baseline and after 3 years of follow-up using a lifestyle questionnaire. In addition, an FFQ was distributed in the third year to measure dietary intake, including alcohol. Women underwent BMD measurements at the femoral neck and lumbar spine at baseline and after 3 years of follow-up.
Kuopio Province, Finland.
Three hundred elderly women (mean age 67·8 years) who provided both BMD measurements and FFQ data.
Alcohol consumption estimated from the FFQ and lifestyle questionnaire was significantly associated with BMD at both measurement sites after adjustment for potential confounders, including lifestyle and dietary factors (P 3 alcoholic drinks/week had significantly higher BMD than abstainers, 12·0 % at the femoral neck and 9·2 % at the lumbar spine. Results based on the lifestyle questionnaire showed higher BMD values for all alcohol-consuming women at the femoral neck and for women drinking 1-3 alcoholic beverages/week at the lumbar spine, compared with non-users.
The results from OSTPRE-FPS suggest that low to moderate alcohol intake may exert protective effects on bone health in elderly women.
PubMed ID
22800300 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in the assessment of body composition in elderly Finnish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187518
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2002 Nov;22(6):383-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Irja Haapala
Anu Hirvonen
Leo Niskanen
Matti Uusitupa
Heikki Kröger
Esko Alhava
Aulikki Nissinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. irja.haapala@uku.fi
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2002 Nov;22(6):383-91
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Body Composition
Body Weight
Electric Impedance
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Abstract
In this study, the bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), skinfold thickness measurement (STM) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), as a reference method, were compared with each other in the assessment of body composition in elderly (62-72-year-old) Finnish women (n=93). BIA had better agreement with DXA in the assessment of fat free mass (FFM, R2=0.70, Sres=2.1) and fat mass (FM, R2=0.93, Sres=2.3) than the STM (FFM, R2=0.62, Sres=2.4; FM, R2=0.89,Sres=2.8). There was quite a large variation in the estimates when different BIA prediction equations were used. The equation developed in this study, FFM (kg)=-128.06 + 1.85 x BMI-0.63 x weight + 1.07 x height - 0.03 x resistance +10.0 x waist-hip ratio, yielded a small and unbiased error (0.5 +/- 1.6 kg), with a small residual standard deviation (R2=0.83, Sres=1.6). However, error associated with the estimate of FM was positively related to the degree of FM. BIA(Heitmann) equation yielded unbiased estimates of both FFM and FM (FFM, R2=0.77, Sres=1.8; FM, R2=0.95, Sres=1.9). Both the STM and BIA (manufacturer's equation) resulted in error which was statistically significant and positively correlated with FFM and FM. These results indicate that BIA prediction equations, chosen with care, can improve the performance of equations based upon anthropometric measurements alone in the assessment of body composition in elderly women.
PubMed ID
12464142 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of low 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations with elevated parathyroid hormone concentrations and low cortical bone density in early pubertal and prepubertal Finnish girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183926
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3):485-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Sulin Cheng
Frances Tylavsky
Heikki Kröger
Merja Kärkkäinen
Arja Lyytikäinen
Arvo Koistinen
Anitta Mahonen
Markku Alen
Jussi Halleen
Kalervo Väänänen
Christel Lamberg-Allardt
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. cheng@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3):485-92
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid Phosphatase - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Bone Density
Bone Resorption - diagnosis
Calcium - urine
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary - diagnosis - etiology - metabolism
Isoenzymes - blood
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Puberty - metabolism
Seasons
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - metabolism
Abstract
Very few studies have evaluated both parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and their effects on bone mass in children.
We studied the associations of serum 25(OH)D and intact PTH (iPTH) with bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) at different bone sites and the relation between serum 25(OH)D and iPTH in early pubertal and prepubertal Finnish girls.
The subjects were 10-12-y-old girls (n = 193) at Tanner stage 1 or 2, who reported a mean (+/- SD) dietary calcium intake of 733 +/- 288 mg/d. 25(OH)D, iPTH, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP 5b), urinary calcium excretion, BMC, areal BMD, and volumetric BMD were assessed by using different methods.
Thirty-two percent of the girls were vitamin D deficient [serum 25(OH)D
Notes
Erratum In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jan;83(1):174
PubMed ID
12936933 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between grip strength change and axial postmenopausal bone loss--a 10-year population-based follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173600
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 Dec;16(12):1841-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Joonas Sirola
Marjo Tuppurainen
Risto Honkanen
Jukka S Jurvelin
Heikki Kröger
Author Affiliation
Bone and Cartilage Research Unit, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio, Finland. joonas.sirola@uku.fi
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 Dec;16(12):1841-8
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Bone Density - physiology
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Femur Neck
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Lumbar Vertebrae
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Perimenopause - physiology
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between grip strength change and postmenopausal bone loss. The study population, 622 peri- and postmenopausal women, was a random sample of the OSTPRE-study cohort (n=13,100) in Kuopio, Finland. Bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) was measured with dual X-ray absorptiometry and grip strength with a pneumatic squeeze dynamometer at baseline in 1989-1991, at the 5-year follow-up in 1994-1997 and at the 10-year follow-up in 1999-2001. Women were divided into three groups according to the change in age-grouped grip strength quartile they belonged to in each measurement (n in 5-year/10-year follow-up): "decreased" (n=150/n=140), "maintained" (n=314/n=320) and "improved" (n=158/n=162). Women within the improved group had significantly lower bone loss at both FN and LS in comparison to the other two groups after 10 years of follow-up (P
PubMed ID
16049626 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations of Baltic Sea and Mediterranean dietary patterns with bone mineral density in elderly women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292375
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Oct; 20(15):2735-2743
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Arja T Erkkilä
Homa Sadeghi
Masoud Isanejad
Jaakko Mursu
Marjo Tuppurainen
Heikki Kröger
Author Affiliation
1Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition,University of Eastern Finland,Yliopistonrantra 1C,PO Box 1627,FI70211 Kuopio,Finland.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Oct; 20(15):2735-2743
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Animals
Anthropometry
Bone Density
Dairy Products
Diet
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Finland
Fishes
Food Quality
Fruit
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Assessment
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Seafood
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
Dietary quality in relation to bone health has been analysed in relatively few studies. The current study aimed to assess the association of the Baltic Sea diet (BSD) and the Mediterranean diet (MD) with bone mineral density (BMD) among elderly women.
Lumbar, femoral and total body BMD were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline and year 3. Dietary intake was measured by 3 d food record at baseline. BSD and MD scores were calculated from food and alcohol consumption and nutrient intake. Information on lifestyle, diseases and medications was collected by questionnaires. Longitudinal associations of BSD and MD scores with BMD were analysed using linear mixed models.
Interventional prospective Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Fracture Prevention study including women aged 65-71 years and residing in Kuopio province, Finland.
Women (n 554) with mean age of 67·9 (sd 1·9) years and mean BMI of 28·8 (sd 4·7) kg/m2.
Higher BSD scores were associated with higher intakes of fruit and berries, vegetables, fish and low-fat dairy products, and lower intake of sausage. Higher MD scores were associated with higher consumption of fruit and berries and vegetables. BSD and MD scores were associated with higher PUFA:SFA and higher fibre intake. Femoral, lumbar or total body BMD was not significantly different among the quartiles of BSD or MD score.
The lack of associations suggest that Baltic Sea and Mediterranean dietary patterns may not adequately reflect dietary factors relevant to bone health.
PubMed ID
28803596 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body mass index and bone loss among postmenopausal women: the 10-year follow-up of the OSTPRE cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131092
Source
J Bone Miner Metab. 2012 Mar;30(2):208-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Jarmo Saarelainen
Vesa Kiviniemi
Heikki Kröger
Marjo Tuppurainen
Leo Niskanen
Jukka Jurvelin
Risto Honkanen
Author Affiliation
Bone and Cartilage Research Unit, Clinical Research Center, University of Eastern Finland, P. O. Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio, Finland. jtsaarel@hytti.uku.fi
Source
J Bone Miner Metab. 2012 Mar;30(2):208-16
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Resorption - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Linear Models
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Postmenopause - physiology
Reference Values
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Obesity protects against osteoporosis, but the magnitude of this association has been difficult to assess from cross-sectional or short term studies. We examined the time course of bone loss as a function of body mass index (BMI) in early and late postmenopausal women. Our study population (n = 300) was a random sample of the population-based Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention (OSTPRE) Study, Finland. We excluded women without complete BMD results, premenopausal women during the second bone densitometry and women who had used hormone replacement therapy, bisphosphonates or calcitonin. BMI along with femoral neck and spinal bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed three times by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry during a mean follow-up of 10.5 years (SD 0.5). The mean baseline age was 53.6 years (SD 2.8), time since menopause 2.9 years (SD 4.3) and BMI 27.3 kg/m(2) (SD 4.4). The data was analyzed by linear mixed models. Thus, we were able to approximate the bone loss up to 20 postmenopausal years. To illustrate, a woman with a baseline BMI of 20 kg/m(2) became osteopenic 2 (spine) and 4 (femoral neck) years after menopause, while obesity (BMI of 30 kg/m(2)) delayed the incidence of osteopenia by 5 (spine) and 9 (femoral neck) years, respectively. The delay was due to high baseline BMD of the obese, while bone loss rate was similar for both lean and obese subjects. This lean versus obese difference may also be partly due to altered X-ray attenuation due to fat mass.
PubMed ID
21938384 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bone loss and wrist fractures after withdrawal of hormone therapy: The 15-year follow-up of the OSTPRE cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276528
Source
Maturitas. 2016 Mar;85:49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Jarmo Saarelainen
Saara Hassi
Risto Honkanen
Heli Koivumaa-Honkanen
Joonas Sirola
Heikki Kröger
Marja H Komulainen
Marjo Tuppurainen
Source
Maturitas. 2016 Mar;85:49-55
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Bone Density
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Femur
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lumbar Vertebrae
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Withholding Treatment
Wrist Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
Long-term bone mineral density (BMD) or fracture incidence changes after withdrawal of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) are not well known.
To study long-term postmenopausal bone loss and incidence of wrist fracture in respect to duration and withdrawal of self-reported HT.
A 15-year follow-up of the population-based prospective OSTPRE cohort in Kuopio, Finland.
Women (mean baseline age 53.4 years, range 48.1-59.6) were divided into four groups based on duration of HT: (1) never users (non-HT); (2) those who had used HT only throughout the 1st 5-year period (HT5); (3) throughout the first 10-years (HT10); (4) those who used HT throughout the entire 15-year follow-up (HT15).
Femoral (n=857) and spinal (n=599) BMD measurements with dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were carried out at 5-year intervals in 1989-2004. Wrist fracture incidence in 1989-2004 was studied in a population of 5119 women.
The adjusted spinal BMD (L2-L4) changes by HT use during the entire 15-year follow-up were -4.8% for non-HT (p0.05) and +3.2% for HT15 (p0.05) groups. Comparing to non-HT group the risk of wrist fracture was reduced by 33% (p=0.045) in HT10 group and by 63% (p
PubMed ID
26857879 View in PubMed
Less detail

38 records – page 1 of 4.